5 Myths about Sweat

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Myth #1: The more you sweat, the better the workout.

It’s likely that we have all heard this at one time or another. The truth is, sweat has one function – to cool the body down. Sweating isn’t a good measure of how effective your work out is because some people just sweat more than others. If you want a good indicator of how effective your workouts are, measure your heart rate or the amount of calories burned.

Myth #2: Excessive sweating during exercise means you’re out of shape.

Definitely not true. Sweating during exercise is just a good indicator that the body is efficiently cooling itself down. Most professional athletes sweat more than the average person. Why? It’s because their bodies are more efficient at using sweat to cool down. However, interestingly enough, people who are overweight tend to sweat more than those who are not. The temperature gauge in someone who is overweight has to work harder to keep the body cool, which results in more sweat production.

Myth #3: Sweat causes body odor.

This seems like a logical fact, right? Wrong. Sweat doesn’t actually have an odor because the sweat from your body is 99% water and 1% salt and other protein and fat-based metabolites. The stench that is so unappealing is a by-product of sweat mixing with the bacteria that lives on the surface of the skin.

Myth #4: Baby powder can stop underarm sweating.

Some may think that a natural remedy for excessive underarm sweating like baby powder can reduce the amount of sweat, but in reality, using baby powder under your arms is more of a hassle than an effective tool. Applying baby powder is pretty messy, and once the powder gets wet it can ruin your clothes. Not effective. Try using an antiperspirant like SweatBlock instead of baby powder.

Myth #5: Antiperspirants can cause breast cancer and Alzheimer’s disease.

Don’t be fooled by this common myth. The American Cancer Society and the Alzheimer’s Association say that the aluminum salts in antiperspirants are not the problem. To avoid health risks you should cut dietary salts.