What’s worse than a pair of sweaty armpits?

A pair of yellow sweat stains on your favorite shirt.

There’s no silver lining to sweat stains (more like gold-ish). They’re embarrassing, distracting and ruin your clothes.

If you aren’t careful, they could derail your social life and end up costing you a small fortune. (replacing your favorite outfit every 2 weeks ain’t cheap.)

Here’s the good news, there are ways to prevent sweat stains and ways to get rid of sweat stains after they occur.

We’ll help you with both…

The best way to beat pit stains is to avoid them in the first place.

5 Tips to Prevent Sweat Stains

  • 1. Wear a cheap undershirt to avoid getting sweat stains on your dress shirts and nice clothes. For fitted and tailored shirts you’ll want to use sweat pads or sweat guards.
  • 2. Use a clinical-strength antiperspirant. A strong antiperspirant can prevent bacteria-prone sweat from staining your shirts. Apply antiperspirant before bedtime and let it dry completely before getting dressed. If you put on too much antiperspirant or don’t let it dry completely, it can lead to yellow pit stains.
  • 3. Trim your armpit hair. Your underarm hair can collect excess sweat, dirt, and bacteria (the perfect recipe for sweat stains). By trimming pit hair, you can prevent lingering sweat and odor causing bacteria.
  • 4. Wash sweaty shirts ASAP! The longer you leave a sweaty shirt to dry, the stronger the stain sets in. Handwash sweaty clothes with a little bit of laundry detergent and cold water to keep the stain from setting in.
  • 5. Take it easy with the deodorant. Like some antiperspirants, deodorant can also cause yellow stains on your shirts. To avoid this, apply a light layer to your underarms and let it air dry before dressing. The secret here is to get the deodorant in your pits without getting it on your shirt.

If you can’t stop the sweat stains, these tips will help you to remove them.

How to Get Rid of Pit Stains

Treating sweat stains can be tricky. If you don’t wash your sweat-soiled clothes quickly and properly, the stains can set in — and may not come out at all. But the good news is, it is possible to remove sweat stains from your clothes. In fact, once you know how, it’s actually pretty easy to do.

How to Clean Pit Stains That Aren’t Totally Set In

Do you typically get pit stains on your shirt while you’re working out or while you’re cutting the grass on a hot day? If so, these are the easiest type to remove.

Sweat stains are a lot harder to remove from your clothing once they’ve set in, and for pit stains to set in, they have to dry. So if you can treat your shirt immediately, you won’t have to worry about sweat stains ruining it. And the best part is, all you need to do is run the soiled part of your shirt under some cold water. Then, gently rub the stained part of the fabric together to loosen up the stain and rinse it thoroughly. Once its dry, you can wash it with the rest of your laundry without any worries.

Can Pit Stains Be Removed If They’re Set In?

If you have sweat stains on a shirt that are already set in, they can still be removed. But it will take a bit more work than putting the shirt in cold water. There are several home remedies that will get rid of pit stains, but you need to make sure the one you use works for the type of shirt you have. For example, the process to remove sweat stains from colored clothing is different than the stain removal process you should use on white clothing — which is why we’ve outlined different techniques for you below.

How to Get Rid of Pit Stains on White Shirts

Getting pit stains on white shirts sucks. They are often even more noticeable than sweat stains on colored shirts, so when it happens, it’s can be really embarrassing — especially if you’re on a date or about to go into a big meeting.

But don’t worry. You don’t have to throw out your favorite white T-shirt or nice, crisp dress shirt. Instead, follow these instructions to remove sweat stains from white clothing.

What you need:

  • 1 cup of white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup of baking soda
  • 1 tablespoon of salt
  • 1 tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide
  • 2 cups of warm water
  • A bowl large enough to hold your shirt and the cleaning solution
  • Small bowl
  • Metal spoon
  • Towel

Once you’ve gathered all of your ingredients:

  • 1. Pour two cups of warm water and one cup of white vinegar to your bowl.
  • 2. Place the shirt in the water and vinegar solution so that the sweat stains are completely covered, and let it soak for between 20 and 30 minutes.
  • 3. Combine the hydrogen peroxide, baking soda, and salt together in a small bowl. Then, use the spoon to mix the ingredients together until it forms a paste.
  • 4. Cover a flat work surface with the towel.
  • 5. Remove the shirt from the large bowl, and then, wring out any excess liquid.
  • 6. Spread the shirt out over the towel, use the spoon to spread the paste mixture over the soiled parts of the shirt. Let the mixture sit on the shirt for about 20 minutes.
  • 7. Once the paste is set in, wash the shirt with a load of whites as you normally would.

How to Get Pit Stains Out of Colored Shirts

You might be surprised to discover that the same process you use to get sweat stains out of white clothing can’t use on colored clothing — the hydrogen peroxide can ruin them.

To remove sweat stains from colored clothing, soak the item in a mixture of cold water and white vinegar for between 20 and 30 minutes. Then, run cold water over the soiled area, and gently rub the area with your fingers to loosen the stain. Then, wash the clothing like you normally would — in a load with like colors.

If you don’t have white vinegar on hand, crush a few aspirins up. Then, mix the crushed aspirin with water to make a paste. Apply the paste to the soiled area, and let it sit for about an hour before washing the piece of clothing in the washer and dryer.

Why Do Pit Stains Become Yellow?

It isn’t your sweat that causes pit stains to turn yellow. In fact, sweat is actually colorless. (Well, most of the time. There is a condition called chromhidrosis that causes people to have yellow, blue, or green sweat. But for most people sweat doesn’t have a color.)

When your sweat mixes with the bacteria on your skin, your deodorant, your antiperspirant, and even your clothing, it can cause yellow stains to appear on your clothes. But it’s the mixture of the sweat, bacteria, and chemicals that cause the yellow hue — not the sweat alone.

How to Get Rid of Yellow Pit Stains

Yellow underarm stains are probably the most embarrassing, and getting rid of them isn’t easy either. But it can be done.

What you need:

  • Liquid dish soap
  • Baking soda
  • Cold water
  • Toothbrush
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Small mixing bowl

When you have your ingredients ready, lay your shirt on a flat surface — inside out. Then…

  • 1. In a small bowl combine equal parts of liquid dish soap, baking soda, and hydrogen peroxide — about a tablespoon of each should do the trick. (If you’re working with a colored shirt, replace the hydrogen peroxide with cold water.)
  • 2. Spread the mixture on the stained area of the shirt.
  • 3. Use the toothbrush to work the mixture into the stain. It will loosen the stain up a bit so the ingredients can work their magic.
  • 4. Let the mixture sit on your shirt for about an hour. Then, use your washer and dryer to clean the shirt as you normally would.

If you have yellow pit stains that are really hard to get out, use an old toothbrush to scrub regular table salt into the stain to loosen it up even more.

Can You Bleach Pit Stains?

While it might seem like bleach would be the best option for removing pit stains from white clothing, it isn’t. In fact, it can actually make the stain worse. So you should avoid using bleach to remove sweat stains from your clothing.

If you prefer not to use a homemade solution, Oxiclean and Puracy Natural Stain Remover are both good alternatives and can work wonders on yellow underarm stains.

Can Dry Cleaners Remove Pit Stains?

So you might be wondering what you should do if you happen to get pit stains on a shirt that’s specifically marked “Dry Clean Only.” In that case, it’s probably not a good idea to try to remove the pit stains on your own.

Professional dry cleaners are able to remove sweat stains from your shirts, but the stains aren’t removed using the normal dry cleaning process. Because of this, it’s important to point the stains out to the cleaner when you drop off your garments. This way, the technician knows that your shirts need to be pre-treated to remove the stains before they are dry cleaned.

Also, because sweat stains are harder to remove the longer they are left to set in, it’s a good idea to take your shirts to the cleaners frequently. It’s actually a good idea to take the shirt to the cleaners the same day if possible.

If you can’t get to the dry cleaner right away, apply a small amount of lemon juice and cold water to the sweat stains on your shirt. This should help prevent the sweat stains from really setting in. Make sure you only use a tiny amount though. It’s okay for the underarm area of the shirt to be slightly damp, but you don’t want to saturate it.

How to Remove Pit Stains From Shirts Before They Set In

Excessive sweating is a lot more common than you probably think. Unfortunately, it’s something that a lot of people have to deal with on a regular basis — and no one wants to walk into a client meeting or complete a presentation with pit stains on their shirt. It’s embarrassing.

If you know you have an important event or you frequently sweat through your work shirts, keep a spare in your office. As soon as you notice sweat stains appearing, change your shirt. Then, take the soiled shirt into the bathroom and run the stained area under cold water. This keeps the stain from setting in completely. You can then hang your shirt in your office to dry. Because the sweat stains didn’t have time to set in, you don’t have to worry about using special cleaning techniques on the shirt later.

If you don’t have a private office, you can still use this technique. Simply keep your spare shirt in your desk drawer or in your car so you have it when needed.

Do Pit Stains Come Out of Silk Shirts?

Pit stains do come out of silk shirts, but we don’t recommend you try to remove the stain yourself. Most silk shirts should only be dry cleaned because the fabric is so delicate. Because of this, you should leave the sweat stain removal to the pros.

Instead of trying to remove sweat stains from a silk shirt yourself, take the shirt to the dry cleaner as soon as possible. As we mentioned above, be sure to point out the stains when you drop off the shirt so it gets the little extra care it needs.

How to Prevent Sweat Stains

Most of the time, it’s a lot easier to prevent sweat stains than it is to remove them. So if you’re prone to excessive sweating, you should consider going on the defensive. But before you learn how to prevent pit stains, you need to understand what actually causes them.

How Do Pit Stains Happen?

According to Mike Thomas of Proctor & Gamble, antiperspirants are actually one of the biggest causes of armpit stains. See, antiperspirant gets absorbed into your clothing, and when it mixes with your sweat, you get nasty yellow pit stains.

But antiperspirants are also the one thing that can help reduce the amount of sweat you produce. Yep, that’s right, we’re back to the Catch-22. If you avoid using antiperspirant, you’re going to sweat a lot more, but using it leaves you with pit stains. So what do you do?

Well, you’re not going to stop using antiperspirant — or deodorant for that matter. Instead, you’re going to change the way you use it.

An Ounce of Prevention

The first thing you need to do when you’re trying to prevent pit stains is to alter your normal routine a bit. The idea is to get your sweating under control first. So instead of applying deodorant and antiperspirant in the morning before you put on your clothing, you’re going to do it at night.

Before you go to bed, take your shower and make sure your underarm area is fully dry. Then, apply a light layer of antiperspirant. We recommend using our SweatBlock towelettes because the clinical-strength antiperspirant actually works to reduce the amount of sweat your body produces for between four and seven days. After wiping your underarm area with the towelette, allow it to dry completely before putting on your pajamas. Then, all you need to do is go to bed and let SweatBlock do the work.

See, the sweat glands in your armpits aren’t as active when you’re sleeping. So it’s a lot easier for antiperspirant to get down into your pores and start working. When you get up in the morning, swipe a thin layer of deodorant onto your armpits — remember, you only want to use a thin layer because sweat stains are caused by the mixture of your deodorant, antiperspirant, and sweat. Now, the most important part is, don’t put your shirt on until your deodorant is fully dry. The key to preventing pit stains is keeping the area as moisture free as possible.

If you need a bit of added protection through the day, carry a travel-size bottle of baby powder with you. It’s easy to apply it to your underarms in small amounts, and it will absorb any moisture in the area right away. Also, don’t forget your undershirt and/or sweat guards. They will help prevent any random sweat stains from soiling your nice clothes. If you prefer an undershirt instead of sweat guards, Thompson Tee undershirts are a good option because they are form fitting, durable, and have a sweat-proof layer of fabric added to the underarm area.

How to Stop Pit Stains Caused By Nervous Sweating

Neverous sweating sucks. We’ve all been there.

It’s totally natural for your body to produce a bit more sweat when you’re nervous, but that doesn’t mean you should have to deal with sweat stains on your shirt too.

There are several things you can do to help prevent nervous and anxiety sweating, which in turn, helps stop the pit stains.

  • 1. Use a strong antiperspirant like SweatBlock to keep your armpits dry. Applying some SweatBlock the night before a high stakes job interview can help reduce that nervous sweat and boost your confidence.
  • 2. Skip your morning coffee or cut down on your daily caffeine intake. Caffeine activates your “fight or flight” mode which leads to higher body temperatures, higher blood pressure, and increased sweating.
  • 3. Meditate. If you can keep calm, you can prevent a lot of the nervous sweating that occurs. How can you do this? Practice some meditation techniques to help calm your nerves. Visualize potentially stressful situations and rehearse them in your mind beforehand. Dissect them, figure out why they trigger anxious feelings or fear. Envision the desired outcome and how it can happen. Simply put, you need to convince your mind that saying “hello”, shaking hands, first dates, public speaking, job interviews and other social interactions are not life-threatening. It’s sounds silly, but it can work. If you can keep your body from switching into this survival mode, you can avoid a lot of the anxious sweat.
  • 4. Manage your diet. Cut down on red meats, processed foods, fast foods and carb loaded treats. These foods make your body work harder to process and lead to increased sweating. You should also avoid spicy foods. Spicy food contains a chemical that tricks your body into thinking temperatures are high. As a result, you sweat more after eating spicy snacks. Drink lots of water, eat vegetables, fruits, calcium rich foods and get your vitamins D and B. These foods can help reduce your body temperature and aid in digestion. All of which promote less sweating.

How to Prevent Pit Stains on White Shirts

Unfortunately, pit stains show up a lot easier on white shirts than they do colored ones. So the easiest way to prevent pit stains from appearing on white shirts is to wear an undershirt or sweat guards to keep the sweat at bay. Sweat guards are also commonly known as garment or dress shields. Some attach to your clothing, while others slide over your arm, attaching to the top of your arm using an elastic band.

You can even make your own garment pads by cutting a panty liner in half. Then, attaching the side with the adhesive to the armpit area of your shirt. This way they absorbent pad soaks up any armpit sweat you have throughout the day.

How to Hide Pit Stains

If all else fails, dressing strategically to hide your pit stains is a great option.

Try following some of these tips to hide embarrassing sweat stains.

Choose your shirt color wisely. Gray, bright, and light-colored shirts aren’t very forgiving, but black and navy shirts hide sweat stains well.

Layer bright colors over neutrals. If you’re worried about sweat stains, bright colored shirts are the worst option. So instead of choosing a bright colored shirt, opt for a neutral brown, navy, or black shirt and wear a bright jacket over it.

Wear cotton or linen shirts instead of shirts made of polyester or rayon. Synthetic fabrics don’t let your skin breathe at all. If possible, consider choosing a shirt made with moisture-wicking fabric.

Choose loose-fitting clothing. Shirts that are cut with long, flowing sleeves let air flow freely, which keeps your shirt away from your skin as much as possible.

In the end, a good strategy for preventing sweat stains is the best way to get rid of them: Stay clean, stay hydrated, eat healthy, dress strategically, manage stress, and use a strong antiperspirant like SweatBlock (be sure to apply at night and let it dry before getting dressed).

Do you ever feel like you’re the sweatiest person in the room? Is excessive facial or forehead sweat getting in the way of life? (dictating your wardrobe, your social activities, and even where you sit in a bar or restaurant)

The embarrassment and humiliation are enough to drive one to a life of isolation.

You’ve probably asked yourself, “Why do I sweat so much?

Anxiety, stress, medications, diet, and climate are all possible causes of profuse face sweating.

For some of us, the cause is more mysterious and the sweat is even more extreme.

This type of excessive sweating is called hyperhidrosis. In fact, there are several types of hyperhidrosis.

In this article we’re going to focus on craniofacial hyperhidrosis or excessive sweating of the face.

Hyperhidrosis affects an estimated 15 million people in the United States. Roughly 10% of them suffer from excessive forehead and facial sweating. Like you, they want to stop their excessive sweating.

While there isn’t a sure-fire cure for hyperhidrosis, there are tips and treatments that can provide relief from forehead and facial sweating.

9 Ways to Stop Face & Forehead Sweating:

  1. Handkerchiefs, Bandanas and Cooling towels
  2. Diet Hacks – Less carbs, sugar and caffeine. More vegetables, vitamins and H20.
  3. Reduce Stress + Anxiety
  4. Stop Focusing on the Sweat
  5. Clinical Strength Antiperspirants
  6. Prescription Strength Antiperspirants
  7. Botox Injections
  8. Iontophoresis
  9. Medications for Craniofacial Hyperhidrosis

How to Treat Sweaty Forehead and Facial Sweat

Let’s take a closer look at each one of these tips and treatments designed to stop sweaty forehead. Some are simple and inexpensive. Some aren’t so simple and will set you back a hefty chunk of change. The seriousness of your condition and what you may have already tried will determine which one(s) you choose.

1) Handkerchiefs, Bandanas or Cooling Towels

If you’re looking for a quick, cheap fix. These sweaty face hacks can provide some minor relief. Carry a clean handkerchief in your back pocket to wipe away excess sweat throughout the day. You can also wear a bandana to soak up extra sweat. While not a viable solution for everyone, it can help. If you live in a hot climate, a cooling towel can be very helpful in bringing down your body temperature and reducing sweat.

2) Diet Hacks to Tame Facial Sweating

Here’s the deal… you’re health is often times a reflection of your diet. If you have a poor diet, things aren’t going to work as well. Before you start taking crazy medications or undergoing life-altering surgeries, take a shot at optimizing your diet for less sweat.

What can you do? Here’s a few tweaks you can make to give yourself a fighting change at beating face/forehead sweat.

More Water: If you’re not getting enough water, your body is going to have a hard time cooling down.Less Caffeine: Caffeine promotes the release of adrenaline and puts your body into beast mode “fight or flight”. Your heart rate goes up, blood pressure rises, and for a few hours you feel unstoppable. All the super powers that come from your favorite energy drink or morning coffee have side effects. Yep… with that gain comes some pain – more sweat.

Less Alcohol: Alcohol can increase heart rate and dilate the blood vessels. This can increase body temperature and cause more sweating than normal.

Less Carbs and Junk Food: Many hyperhidrosis sufferers claim that low carb diets and Keto diets can be very effective at treating face sweating and hyperhidrosis.

More Vegetables: Vegetables do a host of things to make your body work smoother. Aside from promoting balance, veggies can aid in smooth digestion which helps reduce sweating.

More Vitamins: Vitamins, like Vitamin B, help your body carry out critical metabolic functions and inter-nerve communication that keeps things running smoothly. A smooth running body works less and sweats less.

You’ll also want to avoid spicy foods and hot foods. Spicy foods trick your body into thinking temperatures are rising and you end up sweating more. Hot foods, like coffee or soup, increase core body temperature and promote sweating.

Excessive sweating is also a common side effect of being overweight. By implementing some of the above diet hacks with some regular exercise, you can lose weight and boost your confidence. (both can drastically decrease embarrassing forehead sweat.)

3) Reduce Stress & Anxiety

A lot of people who suffer from excessive facial sweating also suffer from anxiety. In fact, anxiety and emotional stress are one of the most common sweat triggers. It makes sense that reducing the stress in your life can also eliminate the anxiety sweating that comes with it.

4) Stop Focusing on the Sweat

One of the biggest triggers for sweat is thinking about sweat. If you suffer from profuse face sweating, you know what I mean. You walk into a room, you start to think “please don’t sweat, please don’t sweat.”, your body kicks into fear/survival mode, you start sweating, you wonder “do they notice my sweat? I hope they can’t see it”, more sweat follows… and the vicious cycle continues. Eliminate your fear of sweating and it’s perceived consequences and you can eliminate much of resulting anxiety sweat.

5) Clinical Strength Antiperspirant

These antiperspirants contain higher concentrations of the active ingredients that stop profuse sweating. One of those ingredients, aluminum chloride, works by plugging sweat glands. Sweatblock is one of these. Sweatblock is stronger than the antiperspirants you’ll find down the personal care aisle as it contains 14% aluminum chloride. For many people, these enhanced-concentration antiperspirants are the best solution. They are considered the first line of attack to control excessive facial sweating. Because you can apply them with a towelette, they can be used anywhere on the body, including the forehead and face. They are also available in cream or ointment form. Applications are often repeated every four to seven days as needed.

6) Prescription Strength Antiperspirants

If you’re under a doctor’s care for your sweaty forehead, he/she may prescribe an antiperspirant with a higher concentration of the active sweat preventing ingredient. These are only available by prescription and contain up to 30% aluminum chloride hexahydrate. These antiperspirants are applied on the affected area with special applicator pads or a towelette. Be careful, these prescription strength antiperspirants can cause serious skin irritations so it’s important to follow the guidelines for use and application exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Both clinical strength and prescription strength hyperhidrosis antiperspirants are formulated primarily for underarm use but they have also proven effective for treating face and forehead sweating.

7) Botox Injections (Botulinum Toxin)

Treatment with botulinum toxin (Botox) is a long-term solution for face and forehead sweating. It temporarily blocks the chemical that switches on the nerves that cause excessive sweating. If you and your doctor opt for these injections, your skin will first be anesthetized. Each affected area of your head and/or face will receive enough injections to ensure that all the nerves have been treated. The injections are shallow and penetrate just below the surface of the skin. Botox injections performed on the face and forehead are delicate procedures so you’ll want to find a skillful and experienced practitioner. The procedure is normally not lengthy and can be done in the doctor’s office. The desired effects will last 4 to 12 months, after which the treatments must be repeated. Botox injections have been shown to reduce forehead and facial sweating up to 87%. While safe and effective, this treatment is painful. Some people experience temporary muscle pain in the treated areas. Botox injections have also proven effective in treating gustatory sweating, also known as Frey’s Syndrome. This condition leads to profuse sweating after eating even mild foods and can even occur when only thinking about eating.

8) Iontophoresis for Facial Hyperhidrosis

Iontophoresis is a treatment that has been used to treat excessive sweating since the 1940s. It’s usually applied to the hands or feet but recent improvements in its application have made the treatment more effective for craniofacial hyperhidrosis too. An easy way of understanding this procedure is to think of it as an injection without a needle. It is non-invasive and uses a low-level electric current to drive medications through the skin’s surface with the use of special pads. The process is usually repeated two or three times a week until the desired results are realized. At this point, recipients are switched to a maintenance schedule of once per week. Iontophoresis devices can be purchased allowing patients to self-medicate at home. The equipment is pricey and probably not covered by your insurance.

9) Nerve Blocking Medications for Hyperhidrosis

These medicines are called anticholinergics and are taken by mouth. Glycopyrrolate is the most commonly used. Its use as a treatment for facial sweating is considered “off-label,” meaning that while it is effective in controlling forehead and face sweating, it was formulated to treat other medical conditions. Anticholinergics work by blocking chemical messengers from reaching the receptors in the sweat glands. There are other similar receptors located in various parts of the body. Because these medicines cannot target only facial or forehead sweat glands, sweating is reduced throughout the entire body. Reduced sweating everywhere may cause overheating in some situations, so be cautious. Also, side effects such as dry mouth, constipation, blurry vision, difficulty urinating and even heart palpitations can occur. Researchers have recently found a potential dementia link in older patients (65+) using anticholinergics.

Sweaty Face and Forehead Home Remedies

There’s no shortage of do-it-yourself home remedy tips that claim to successfully treat profuse face and forehead sweating. Most are astringents used to constrict your eccrine glands and reduce sweating. They can, according to the claims, also balance pH levels. Among the most popular are drinking apple cider vinegar, sage tea or chamomile tea. Adding some honey to these teas seems to help the medicine go down. Tea tree oil is also an astringent that can be applied to the skin. Essential oils are another way to attack forehead sweat. Suggested essential oil remedies include cypress, lavender, lemon, lime, niaouli, peppermint, petitgrain and pine.

Surgery for Facial and Forehead Sweating

Surgery to remedy excessive sweaty forehead and face is not recommended – except as a last resort. The surgery most often used is endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS). It’s a permanent solution intended for people with hyperhidrosis of the hands but is sometimes used for extreme cases of craniofacial sweating. The procedure clips nerves from the spinal column that trigger sweat glands in the forehead and face. Serious and unintended consequences can result including excessive compensatory sweating in other parts of the body.

Why Does My Face Sweat So Much?

You already know that sweating is nature’s way of regulating body temperature. Sweating is natural and beneficial… except when it’s not. Normal sweating occurs when we’re overheated or when we’re stressed or nervous. When we sweat much more than is needed to control body heat or when we sweat excessively when we’re nervous, it’s considered primary hyperhidrosis.

Another cause of excessive sweating is diaphoresis. It differs from hyperhidrosis in that it is caused by an unrelated medical condition. Menopause, pregnancy, diabetes, thyroid disorders and heart attack are common causes. Diaphoresis usually affects the entire body and not specific locations.

Your face and forehead are covered with a high concentration of eccrine glands. Sympathetic nerves trigger eccrine sweat glands to secrete water directly to the surface of the skin where it cools the body by evaporation. With craniofacial hyperhidrosis, the eccrine glands go crazy.

Excessive sweating of the face and forehead is a physiological condition. It’s thought to be an inherited, genetic trait that affects the sympathetic nervous system. It can also be triggered by stress and anxiety as well as body temperature. But unlike normal sweating, it’s profuse. So profuse and excessive that it’s embarrassing, distressing and it can be debilitating if it negatively affects your quality of life. Those beads of sweat dripping from your forehead and covering your face like a sheet of heavy rain are more than annoying. They can make you want to take your cold sweaty forehead and retreat into hiding.

Here are six common complications that can occur from excessive forehead and facial sweating:

Skin Infections

Sufferers from a sweaty forehead and face are more prone to skin infections. Frequently moist skin can promote the growth of bacteria that cause common skin infections. These are particularly prevalent around hair follicles.

Maceration

Maceration is the scientific term for the mushy, wet appearance the skin can take on with profuse and chronic forehead and face sweating.

Stinging Eyes

There’s nothing quite like the sting that hits like a tsunami when waves of forehead sweat wash over your blinking eyes. Wiping your sweaty brow may not keep up with the deluge. If you’re swimming, working outside in warm weather or trying to drive, stinging sweat in the eyes can be a serious problem.

Acne and Pimples

Excessive sweating by itself does not cause acne or pimples. But, when sweat combines with over-productive oil glands, the glands can become clogged resulting in pimples, or even worse, acne.

Heat rash

Heat rash occurs when sweat droplets are trapped in blocked pores and cannot get to the surface of the skin to evaporate. The inflammation that results causes a rash. The common symptoms are red bumps popping up on the skin and a prickly or itchy sensation. Getting rid of heat rash is simple in theory, but not easy for people with overly sweaty foreheads – keep the head and face dry.

Social/emotional

The social and emotional fall-out from your cold sweaty forehead problem can be the worst complication of all. If you’re like most people who suffer from hyperhidrosis, you worry. You worry about how you look. You worry about feeling embarrassed in social situations. You worry about your sweaty forehead when eating out with friends. You worry at work. You live in fear of speaking in front of coworkers or clients. You worry about your relationships with significant others. Is there any social interaction you don’t worry about?

All these worries stemming from your overactive sweat glands could lead to generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). GAD is rarely the cause of hyperhidrosis but can become a secondary symptom. It messes up your life. You may lose interest in things you love and even lapse into hopelessness.

If you experience any of these symptoms of secondary anxiety caused by hyperhidrosis, it’s vital that you seek treatment as soon as you possibly can.

Summing up

If you’re reading this article it’s likely because you suffer from facial hyperhidrosis or you’re close to somebody who does. It’s a real thing, a serious condition. The cause is probably hereditary and there is no known cure, but there are numerous treatments that can reduce or eliminate the symptoms. Life can be livelier. Life can be easier and free from sweaty embarrassment.

The treatments vary in complexity and cost. Whether it’s a clinical strength antiperspirant like Sweatblock or a nerve-blocking oral medicine, something is bound to work. Your runaway perspiring can be controlled. There is no reason to suffer in silence or for a moment longer.

Potent-smelling food sticks with you. If you suffer from excessive sweat, that cheddar-and-onion-burger-on-a-garlic-and-jalapeno-bun will rise again, in the form of dangerously potent body odor. While you might not smell exactly like the pungent food you enjoyed a few hours ago, the powerful aroma molecules which made your meal so smelly in the first place will happily do the same for you.

Avoid These Stinky Foods to Avoid Smelly Sweat:

stinky garlic

GARLIC

A bundle of garlic may wart of vampires… Unfortunately, it won’t do your breath or sweaty pits any favors. Avoid garlic to lesson the stink of your body odor. If you can’t keep yourself from the garlic, substitute dry garlic for fresh to lessen the impact.

stinky onions

ONIONS

Raw onions, though tasty, pack quite the punch. Go for the cooked variety when possible and choose white onions over yellow and purple onions when shopping. The darker the onion, the stronger the scent.

stinky fried food

FATTY & FRIED FOODS

Odors bind to fats and oils. When these are expelled through your apocrine glands, the odors bind to you. So, unless you want to smell like the local burger barn, keep away from the fried and fatty.

stinky cheese

STRONG (STINKY) CHEESES

Brevibacterium linens, a bacteria found on human skin which produces foot odor, is used to ferment Limburger and Munster cheese. The odor it lends to the cheese isn’t one you want more of on your body.

stinky cabbage

CABBAGE

We all love stinky cabbage soup… no, wait… no one really likes eating cabbage. Avoiding this stinky food should be quite simple.

cured meat

CURED MEAT

Whether or not science will ever prove the existence of the legendary “meat sweats”, all the salt and nitrates in bacon, salami, and jerky will certainly prove themselves strong via your sweat glands.

stinky curry

CURRY

A double threat! Not only will spicier curries induce thermoregulatory sweating, they’ll stink it up too.

You don’t have to give up everything on the list–some of the foods listed may not even affect you! Everyone’s body chemistry is different, so it’s important to be mindful of any correlation between what you’re eating and how you’re smelling.