groin sweat

Let’s face it, groin sweat can lead to some rather embarrassing moments. When your sweat is visible and makes you feel smelly, slimy and self-conscious– it isn’t just bad, it’s darn bad (and gross too). There’s nothing like a sweaty crotch to put a damper on your day. Here are some ways that can help:

10 Ways to Deal with Crotch Sweat

  • 1. Wear the Right Clothing
  • 2. Loose is Better Than Tight
  • 3. Sweat-Resistant Underwear
  • 4. Change Your Clothes
  • 5. Hygienic Trimming
  • 6. Powders and Creams
  • 7. Antiperspirants
  • 8. Body Wipes
  • 9. Botox Injections
  • 10. Last Resorts

There are more than a few causes of groin sweat. But, before we get into each of them, let’s take a quick look at the physiology of sweat.

What is Groin Sweat?

Everybody knows that sweat is the mechanism by which the body cools itself and maintains its core temperature. You probably also know that the underarms, crotch, hands, feet, and forehead are the places we sweat most and most often.

The reason that these areas of the body are more prone to excessive sweating than others is no mystery: It’s just a matter of numbers.

The average person has about 2 million sweat glands. Some people have as many as 4 million sweat glands. There are two kinds, eccrine and apocrine. Eccrine sweat glands are distributed just about everywhere on the body (ear canals, lips, and genitals are the exceptions.) The sweat they secrete is clear and mostly made up of water, salt, and electrolytes.

Apocrine glands are found in abundance in and around your armpits, scalp, eyelids, and nipples. They’re concentrated around areas where there are lots of hair follicles. This includes the groin region in both men and women. The sweat secreted by apocrine glands is different. It’s thick and yellow in color and much of it reaches the skin’s surface by way of hair canals. This type of sweat contains much higher concentrations of fatty acids and proteins.

Ladies: There are no sweat glands on the vagina, but there are very high numbers of apocrine sweat glands around the outside of the vagina on the labia majora.

When these fatty acids (lipids) and proteins arrive on the skin’s surface, millions of bacteria are waiting and eager to gorge themselves. As the bacteria break down lipids and proteins, smelly acids are left behind. This causes body odor and that terrible smell we know all too well.

What Causes Excessive Groin Sweating?

First of all, it’s not unusual to sweat between the legs, thighs, and in the groin area. Hot, muggy weather and physical exertion will cause you to sweat, especially down there. The sheer number of sweat glands in the groin can cause profuse sweating.

If hot temperatures or physical exertion are not the cause of your excessive groin sweat, something else may be at work. That something else is called hyperhidrosis. It’s a medical condition that affects an estimated 3% of the population.

There are two kinds of hyperhidrosis: generalized hyperhidrosis and primary focal hyperhidrosis. Generalized hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating over your entire body. It is usually caused by an unrelated underlying condition, like diabetes, cancer, or other disease or disorder.

The other type of hyperhidrosis–and the prime suspect for overactive sweat glands in the groin area–is called primary focal hyperhidrosis. It usually affects one specific area of the body, i.e. the underarms, face, head, hands, feet, or the groin.

Common Causes of Groin Sweat

So, why does your crotch sweat so much? Here are several likely causes:

High Temperature

Even minimal moving around in hot environments will cause you to sweat in the groin area.

Exercise

Any form of vigorous exercise will cause you to sweat in the crotch (and other places). Exercise that’s focused on the lower body will produce more sweat in and around your groin.

Pubic Hair

Because apocrine glands are found in and around the groin, pubic hair traps bacteria and moisture from sweat, creating a virtual greenhouse for bacterial growth. The rapid surge in bacterial population causes itching, discomfort and groin sweat odor. If proper cleansing does not take place, the buildup of sweat and bacteria can lead to groin sweat rash, thigh chafing, and infection.

Bad Underwear

There is good underwear, and then there’s bad underwear. We’re not talking about your Batman briefs. We’re talking about underwear that’s made of synthetic fabrics that don’t breathe. These types of undies don’t wick away moisture and they trap sweat and heat in the groin area. Always choose underwear made from natural, breathable fabrics that can absorb and wick away moisture and allow ventilation. Natural fabrics are also non-allergenic and less likely to cause a rash.

Obesity

You knew it was coming. Yes, if you’re overweight, the chances of excessive groin sweat are much higher. The body is naturally insulated by fat. Excess fat in and around the hips, stomach, and thighs will cause excessive groin sweating.

Feminine Hygiene Products

May panty liners and pads are made of materials that don’t breathe. Wearing them may increase the temperature resulting in increased vaginal sweating. If you must wear pads and panty liners, try changing them at frequent intervals.

Lack of General Hygiene

This probably goes without saying: Good hygiene is critical. Clean your groin area every day, either by bathing, taking a shower, or using a cleansing wipe. To win the battle of groin sweat, you have to start out right–and that means starting out clean.

Hyperhidrosis

Uncontrolled and excessive groin sweat may be a sign of hyperhidrosis. Generalized hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating all over the entire body. Primary focal hyperhidrosis is sweating in one particular part of the body. If you’re experiencing excessive and profuse sweating only in the pubic area, you might be suffering from primary focal hyperhidrosis. A qualified doctor can make that diagnosis.

Menopause

The changing hormone levels in women over the age of 45 often cause hot flashes, which can lead to heavy perspiration–even in the crotch region. Night sweats are also commonly associated with menopause.

Anxiety or Stress

If you’re sweating a lot, it may be due to anxiety and stress.

Diabetes

Diabetes can cause glucose levels to swing wildly, which in turn can cause excessive sweating in both men and women.

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism is caused by an overactive thyroid gland. Other symptoms include weight loss, elevated heart rate, nervousness, and fatigue.

Got Groin Sweat? 10 Ways to Deal with and Stop Crotch Sweat.

Here are the best ways to prevent and control unwanted sweating in your crotch:

1. Wear the Right Clothing

One simple yet effective way to stop sweating and prevent that heat-related groin rash is to wear the right clothing. Synthetic fabrics like rayon and polyester are tightly woven and don’t allow adequate ventilation. While they can wick away moisture, they will retain groin sweat odors. Use caution when choosing clothes made from these fabrics. Some synthetic blends are breathable and are moisture wicking, too.

Clothing made from natural fabrics, like cotton, linen, and wool, are breathing fabrics which allow air to reach the skin. These fabrics (except cotton) also will wick away perspiration, allowing it to evaporate. Cotton, while super absorbent, holds on to moisture longer than other natural materials–and even other synthetic fibers. Silk is also a natural fiber but is not moisture wicking. Silk hangs on to odor, requires special care, and is fragile.

2. Loose is Better Than Tight

Skinny jeans and tight leggings are all the rage. You may love them, but they won’t love you back. Pants that are tight in the crotch area are going to spike the thermometer down there. If you’re wearing skin-tight clothing, fabric will rub against your skin. Friction creates heat. Then heat and friction are going to gang up on you, making you sweat. The sweat will make you feel uncomfortable, and when bacteria are added to the equation, the result can be offensive sweat odor along with the potential for a burning groin sweat rash.

Instead, to minimize heat and moisture, you should opt for loose-fitting pants. Looser pants will provide plenty of room for movement without creating friction. Less friction means less heat, and less heat means less crotch sweat. Loose joggers are great for casual days. For other, less casual situations, choose something comfortable that won’t rub you the wrong way.

3. Sweat-Resistant Underwear

When it comes to underwear, it’s best to choose function over fashion. Sweat-friendly fabrics are especially important when choosing what to wear underneath it all.

Many manufacturers within the athletic apparel industry have developed special fabrics that do a great job of wicking away moisture so it can evaporate. If sweat is allowed to evaporate quickly, bacteria won’t be able to breed and multiply.

These new, space-age fabrics are capable of not only of moisture-wicking, but they can even help regulate temperature, neutralize odor, and fight bacteria. Bamboo underwear, for example, is rapidly growing in popularity. Underwear made from bamboo is soft and moisture-wicking. Additionally, it can help regulate temperature and kill bacteria. Sweat-proof underwear that will help prevent groin sweat is available for both men and women.

4. Change Your Clothes

It may be obvious, but another simple way to control the problem of sweat glands on the rampage is to change your clothing after experiencing a crotch-sweating episode. This is more easily done when at home or after a workout at the gym, but what about other situations? Yes, it could get awkward and may not be an option at times.

You’ll want to do this for a couple of reasons:

First, yeast is a fungus that loves moist, warm climates, like the one between your legs. Spending too much time in sweaty underwear can lead to an opportunistic yeast infection that includes vaginal itching and burning. Unfortunately, yeast infections can be difficult to treat.

Second, if you continue to function in sweat-soaked underwear, you’re going to feel terribly uncomfortable. And when the unpleasant odor becomes noticeable to you and others, you’ll wish you had a spare pair of underwear in your purse or bag.

5. Hygienic Trimming

Ever wonder why we have so much pubic hair? It’s bad enough that we have so many sweat glands in the crotch area. Pubic hair does have a purpose and function: It can act as a friction reducer from our clothing and also works to wick away groin sweat.

But hair traps bacteria on your skin. In genital areas, that can be both good and bad. The good kind of vaginal bacteria helps to prevent yeast from overgrowing. But when groin sweat mixes with bacteria, oil, and pubic hair, there will be unwanted and unpleasant smells.

If you have excessive sweating in the vaginal area, you can reduce the chances of problems with an occasional trim. Be careful, though! You don’t want to nick or cut the skin while trimming. Specialized electric trimmers are available for this task. Also, grooming scissors for pets which have rounded tips can do the job, too.

6. Powders and Creams

Starting your day by dabbing on a moisture-absorbing powder may be the solution for you. If so, you’ll be able to make it through the day without accumulating problematic amounts of groin sweat–along with the accompanying smell and discomfort.

When it comes to powders, there are three popular choices: baby powder, talcum powder or a starch-based powder like corn starch. Many doctors recommend talcum powder, as it tends to be more effective than corn starch products against crotch-area sweat. Powders enriched with antifungal agents are also available. If using baby powder, be careful not to apply inside the vagina. Researchers have uncovered a potential association between baby powder and ovarian cancer if baby powder gets into the body.

Absorbent powders and body powder lotions can also be a good way to reduce “swamp crotch.” Chafing, sticking, and a vinegar-like odor often plagues men with excessive groin sweating. There are dozens of products specifically formulated to control sweating in the nether region and help prevent a rash from groin sweat.

Creams for application in the groin area are intended to treat irritation and rash that result from groin sweat. Jock itch (tinea cruris, aka crotch rot) is a fungal infection that primarily afflicts men, though women can get it, too. Jock itch causes a rash, pain, and itching in and on the groin folds. It’s easily treated with antifungal creams and it can even clear up on its own if the crotch area is kept clean and dry.

7. Antiperspirants

Antiperspirants are not the same as deodorants. Deodorants are fragrance products that mask or neutralize body odor. Antiperspirants, on the other hand, stop sweat before it gets to the surface of the skin.

All antiperspirants contain an aluminum salt compound–usually aluminum chloride. When aluminum chloride comes into contact with moisture (your groin sweat), it forms a gel-like plug that blocks sweat glands from secreting sweat. It’s been used for this purpose for nearly 90 years. The plugs are temporary and will dissipate over time, requiring reapplication to extend perspiration protection.

Should you use a deodorant or an antiperspirant in your groin area? The answer is yes–but be careful.

The skin on your private parts is more sensitive than your armpits or other areas that are subject to a lot of sweating. You don’t want to use a product down there that may irritate your skin and lead to even more serious problems.

A deodorant may help with groin sweat odor, but it won’t do anything to prevent moisture, bacteria growth and possible crotch rash. A deodorant can only partially help solve your groin sweat problems.

Many dermatologists and the International Hyperhidrosis society suggest using an antiperspirant to stop groin sweat, especially if you’ve been diagnosed with primary focal hyperhidrosis.

According to the International Hyperhidrosis Society:

“Antiperspirants are considered the first line of treatment for excessive sweating and can be used nearly anywhere on the body where sweating is a problem. That’s right, antiperspirants are not just for your underarms – you can use them on your hands, feet, face, back, chest, and even groin.”

Check with your doctor if you have concerns about using an antiperspirant in and around your groin–or if you experience irritation, swelling or pain when using an antiperspirant to stop crotch sweat.

8. Body Wipes

A quick, easy and convenient way to temporarily deal with groin sweat is to use body wipes. They are available in single-use packages or in travel versions that can be carried in your purse or pocket.

Flushable (bathroom) wipes are great for this. Most are formulated with vitamin E and aloe, are pH balanced, and they are gentle on the skin. Don’t use wipes with alcohol or antibacterial wipes, as they can kill good vaginal bacteria.

And guys, there are even wipes specially formulated for you and your anatomical differences. Whether its male groin sweat or female groin sweat, there’s a body wipe for you that can help you deal with groin sweat and feel fresh.

9. Botox Injections

Botox injections have been FDA approved for the treatment of excessive sweating of the underarms (axillary sweating) and have become a widely-accepted practice. An increasing number of doctors–particularly dermatologists–are now using Botox to treat profuse sweating of the feet, face, and head.

Today, dermatologists are taking the lead, using Botox to treat other localized areas–including the groin, under the breasts, and on the chest and back. While considered “off label” or “not as intended,” Botox injections in the groin have been successful for many patients.

Botox works by interrupting the signals that your nervous system sends to activate your sweat glands. The beneficial effect usually lasts 3-6 months and must eventually be repeated. When done correctly, there is no negative effect on sexual function.

10. Last Resorts

If your problems with groin sweat are so severe that none of these remedies and treatments are effective, there are other approaches you might want to consider.

Anticholinergics

These drugs are usually taken orally (by mouth). Anticholinergics act by preventing the nervous system from communicating with sweat glands, which stops the sweat glands from activating. Potentially serious side effects can be experienced with these drugs, and they must be prescribed by a qualified physician.

Sweat Gland Removal

As a last and final treatment, doctors can surgically remove sweat glands. This procedure is not reversible and can cause compensatory sweating in other parts of the body.

All Your Sweaty Groin Questions Answered

Groin sweating can be head scratching. Why it’s happening, how it’s happening and what can you do fix it? For your convenience we’ve organized a list of additional groin faqs to help you get to the bottom of your sweat down under.

When should I see a doctor about my groin sweating?

If lifestyle changes, good personal hygiene, and other non-prescriptive treatments aren’t working for you, consult with your doctor.

Can I put deodorant between my legs?

You can, but it won’t do anything more than mask bad groin sweat odor. Ladies, be sure to avoid getting any inside the vagina.

Can I use an antiperspirant on my groin?

According to the International Hyperhidrosis Society and a growing number of dermatologists, the answer is yes. Remember that your skin in the groin area is more sensitive than other areas. Discontinue if you experience discomfort, redness, or swelling. For women: Be careful not to put any inside the vagina. There are no sweat glands there, anyway.

Can excessive sweating be cured?

If excessive sweating is due to an unrelated disorder or disease (generalized hyperhidrosis), successfully treating that condition usually stops the sweating. Otherwise, excessive sweating can only be successfully managed and treated.

Why does my groin sweat smell so bad?

Sweat in the groin area is different than the sweat we experience elsewhere on the body because groin sweat is secreted by apocrine sweat glands. Groin sweat contains fatty acids and proteins which feed bacteria. As the bacteria break down the nutrients in groin sweat, foul-smelling acids are left behind. Additionally, pubic hair traps heat and sweat, creating the perfect breeding environment for bacteria and more bad smells.

Why does my groin sweat at night?

If you’re experiencing night sweats in the groin area, it could be primary focal hyperhidrosis. Other causes could be diabetes or low blood sugar. Women may be having night sweats due to changing hormone levels brought on by menopause.

Dealing with Groin Sweat

Everyone can experience groin sweat. Often, excessive sweating in the crotch area causes an embarrassing, unsightly appearance and offensive odor. Preventative treatments and remedies range from inexpensive and non-invasive to expensive medical procedures. It’s best to start with simple remedies, then work your way down the list until you find a solution that works for you.

If you’re sweating excessively in the groin region, it may be due to any one of a number of causes. Fortunately for all of us, there are ways to curtail, manage and even eliminate crotch sweating and the accompanying and physical and social implications. One or more of these treatments will likely work for you, and your problems with groin sweat will dry up and disappear.

Out of the calm comes the impending doom. It happens when you interact with others. Perhaps it’s a meeting, a presentation, a first date, or even a simple chat with a significant someone. You begin to sweat because you’re nervous. Then you get even more nervous because you’re sweating. You’re caught in the vicious vortex of anxiety sweating.

anxiety sweat

11 Tips to Beat Anxiety and Reduce Stress

  • 1. Let Go and Relax
  • 2. Try Meditation, Visualization or Yoga
  • 3. Dress to Sweat Less and Stress Less
  • 4. Limit “Sweat Triggers” from Your Diet
  • 5. Drink Your Water!
  • 6. Consider a Home Remedy
  • 7. Splash Some Cool Water on Your Face and Wrists
  • 8. Carry a Handkerchief or Baby Wipes
  • 9. Use a Prescription-Strength Antiperspirant
  • 10. Anxiety Medications
  • 11. Other More Expensive and Invasive Treatments

Understanding your nerves and social anxiety is the first step to beating stress sweat.

What is Anxiety?

Anxiety is the emotion you feel when you’re afraid or worried. It’s a natural response to stress. When you feel threatened, physically or emotionally, you feel apprehension and fear about what might be coming.

Anxiety is normal and can be healthy. If anxiety is due to a physical threat, adrenaline is injected into the bloodstream and prepares you with the fight or flight reflex.

Emotional anxiety is that worrisome feeling and unease, sometimes vague, that occurs when no physical threat or danger is apparent, but we fear some social or mental threat. Our emotional anxiety can be caused by negative emotions such as sadness, fear, anger, and rejection, to name a few.

Emotional anxiety is normal. However, normally occurring anxiety and anxiety disorders are two very different things. When our emotional anxiety becomes chronic, hard to control, and interferes with daily life–it’s probably an anxiety disorder.

Why Does Anxiety Cause Excessive Sweating?

We have a love/hate relationship with sweat. The body’s sweating mechanism is a marvel of physiological engineering. When triggered by the hypothalamus in the brain, apocrine and eccrine sweat glands secrete sweat. The evaporation of sweat, composed mostly of water, salt and electrolytes, creates a cooling effect that helps maintain body temperature. Sweating at the gym or when working out is desirable and keeps us healthy.

When does sweat turn from desireable to deplorable? When it’s anxiety sweat — sweat that is excessive, embarrassing and only increases its flow when you begin to stress about it.

Stress and anxiety cause the body to secrete the fight or flight hormones that prepare us for action. These hormones cause our breathing rate to increase, our heart to beat faster, our blood pressure to rise, and–you guessed it–our sweat glands are activated to produce more sweat. A lot more. More than we need, and certainly way more sweat than we want.

Why Does Sweating Lead to Anxiety?

Nervous sweating often leads to even more sweating–sometimes uncontrollably–because we feel self-conscious about it during social interaction. It’s a vicious cycle that feeds on itself.

If you suffer from anxiety sweating, this cycle of stress sweat is probably familiar.

You sweat >>> you stress about sweat >>> your stress causes more sweat >>> your sweat causes more stress… you get the picture.

For many of us, stress and anxiety rear their ugly heads when our confidence is low. We wonder if we have what it takes to succeed in a particular set of social circumstances. In a way, our own bodies betray us by signaling to the outside world that we’re nervous. What do those who suffer from social anxiety fear?

Everyday situations that cause social anxiety sweating are:

  • Public speaking
  • Making a request or presenting information
  • Meeting new people
  • Wanting to impress or be accepted
  • Fear of rejection
  • Being judged or evaluated- as in a job interview
  • Looking odd or feeling out of place
  • Being thrust into unfamiliar situations
  • Wanting to be in control

Do I Have Anxiety?

Let’s be clear: Bouts of anxiety are a natural part of life. It’s a normal response to stressful events and situations we all encounter. Family or relationship problems, changing employment and financial worries are some of the common events that can cause anxiety and some degree of anxiety sweating.

But the kind of normal anxiety that we experience from time to time is much different than the kind of chronic, ever-present anxiety that disrupts our lives at every turn. When the symptoms of severe anxiety overshadow the events that caused them and turn everyday life upside down, they could point to an anxiety disorder.

Here are some of the most prevalent signs and symptoms of anxiety disorders:

Excessive Worrying

This kind of worrying is generally linked to anxiety disorders is way out of proportion to the event that triggers it.

Agitation

Anxiety is our way of telling the nervous system that we’re facing some kind of threat. When that happens, blood is diverted away from your digestive system, your heart rate increases as does the rate of your breathing. And, you sweat excessively. While all this may be appropriate and helpful if a real threat is present, it’s debilitating when the threat is only imagined.

Feeling Restless

Restlessness can be a symptom of anxiety disorder, especially when it occurs in children and teens. Not everyone who has been diagnosed with anxiety experience restless feelings, but it is one of the signs doctors look for in diagnosing anxiety.

Fatigue

If you become easily fatigued, it may be a sign of anxiety. It’s often a sign of depression, too.

Difficulty Concentrating

Many people who suffer from anxiety report having trouble concentrating. Studies including children, teens, and adults demonstrate that 60% to 90% of people diagnosed with anxiety have serious difficulty concentrating.

Feeling Irritable

Even those of us who experience normal anxiety levels feel more irritable when we’re feeling anxious. A study including over 6,000 adults found that more than 90% reported having feelings of heightened irritability when their anxiety disorder was in high gear.

Muscle Tension

If your muscles feel tense on most days, that can be another symptom of anxiety disorder. Some doctors have found that treating muscle tension with muscle relaxants can at the same time reduce feelings of anxiety.

Trouble Sleeping

One of the most frequently reported symptoms of anxiety is falling asleep and waking up often during the night. It’s a chicken and egg conundrum. Does anxiety cause insomnia or does insomnia cause anxiety? We just don’t know.

Panic Attacks

Panic disorder is a specific kind of anxiety disorder. A panic attack produces intense episodes of fear. Panic attacks can trigger rapid heartbeat, increased sweating, chest pain, and even nausea.

Fear of Social Situations

Social anxiety disorder is not uncommon and affects an estimated 12% of adults at some point in their lives. If you feel anxious about social events and avoid them, it can be a sign of social anxiety disorder. Fear of being judged, embarrassed, humiliated, or scrutinized by others are red flags that point to social anxiety. Extreme shyness and remaining silent in groups can signal social anxiety, too.

Excessive Sweating

Cold sweats, night sweats, and excessive sweating on the hands, palms, forehead, face, under the arms–and even sweaty feet– can all be symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder. Excessive sweating and uncontrolled sweating could also be caused by hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis is often the root cause of social anxiety.

Diagnosing generalized anxiety disorder includes a physical exam to determine if anxiety might be caused by an underlying medical condition, such as hyperhidrosis, or medications you’re taking. Your medical history and a psychological questionnaire will also be used to arrive at a diagnosis. One such anxiety disorder test includes questions like these:

  • Do a lot of things cause you to worry or feel anxious?
  • Do you think you worry excessively?
  • Do you worry most days?
  • Has it been six months or more that you’ve been worrying like this?
  • Do you have difficulty controlling your worry?
  • Have you noted physical symptoms like, trouble sleeping, feeling restless, chronic fatigue, tense muscles, trouble with concentration or feeling easily irritated?
  • Is your ability to function at work, in social situations, at school or in other areas of importance to you, negatively affected by your worrying?

If you’re wondering if you have an anxiety disorder or if you have anxiety attack symptoms, visit with your doctor. Anxiety disorders and panic attacks can be treated and managed.

What Causes Anxiety?

Stress is the number one cause of anxiety. For those who suffer from anxiety sweating, the phrase, “Don’t sweat it,” seems like mockery. Anxious people stress over almost everything, and that stress makes them sweat. A lot. Learning how to stop stress sweat and finding an effective stress treatment are high priorities.

Stress and sweat travel together, and they’re rarely separated. There are three basic causes of sweat: heat, activity, and–you guessed it–stress. We produce different types of sweat depending on the cause.

Sweat from heat and activity is secreted by the eccrine sweat glands. It is composed of 99% water and small amounts of protein, lipids, and other nutrients. It’s the kind of sweat that cools us down as it evaporates.

In contrast, stress sweat comes from apocrine sweat glands. Of the 2 to 4 million sweat glands that cover our bodies, most are eccrine glands. Apocrine glands are concentrated in areas where there is an abundance of hair follicles, like armpits, and around the genitals. Apocrine glands secrete sweat that is thicker than heat sweat and contains more lipids, nutrients, and proteins. Stress causes the apocrine glands to push stress sweat to the surface of the skin.

Waiting on the skin’s surface is bacteria. When bacteria come into contact with the high levels of protein and nutrients in stress sweat, the bacteria begin to feast. The result is not only unsightly moisture, but it also produces a strong odor. A really bad, offensive odor. To answer the question, “Does stress sweat smell worse than sweat from exercise?” the answer is a resounding YES.

Here’s another interesting tidbit. Recent studies have found that people can tell if sweat odor is caused by emotional stress. Your smelly stress body odor lets everybody know that you’re anxious.

Stress and stress sweat can be caused by perceived physical threats, emotional anxiety, pain, and mental duress. Most of us experience stress sweat before a job interview, making a presentation in a meeting, receiving criticism or evaluation or even running late for an appointment.

How to Stop Stress Sweat

Ideally, the best way to stop anxiety sweating is to simply stop the stress. But for most of us, that’s just not an available option. So, here are a few ways to stop stress sweat and the unpleasant odor it brings:

Deodorants

Deodorants can stop stress sweat odor, although they can’t stop the sweat itself. Fragrances mask the undesirable odor and may help reduce bacteria, but they can’t do anything about those telltale sweat marks around your armpits.

Antiperspirants

Antiperspirant can block the sweat glands from producing protein-laced sweat which attracts bacteria. When bacteria mixes with stress sweat the resulting odor can be quite unpleasant.

Grab a Deodorant Antiperspirant combo to stop sweat and control odor.

Prescription Strength Antiperspirants

Prescription-strength antiperspirant products contain higher concentrations of aluminum chloride and can be purchased without a prescription. A single application can last up to 7 days. Prescription-strength antiperspirants can be an effective stress sweat treatment that works for many who suffer from stress sweating caused by anxiety or hyperhidrosis.

Other Treatments

If you find that antiperspirants or prescription antiperspirants don’t adequately manage or stop your stress sweat, there are other stress sweat treatments. However, these are more invasive and expensive. Treatment options include Botox injections, microwave treatments, and even surgical sweat gland removal.

How to Deal with Anxiety and Stress Sweat

Here are 11 ways to deal with sweat caused by stress and chronic anxiety:

1. Let Go and Relax

Much of the anxiety we all experience from time to time is due to our need to feel in control. Letting go of the urge to control every situation can go a long way to reducing the stress we feel. It sounds overly simplistic but relaxing a little can make a big difference.

2. Meditation, Visualization or Yoga

Meditation can help you contain your anxious feelings and relax your breathing. Relaxed breathing can quell an active stress response and help reduce stress. Visualizing desired outcomes and behavior can help form a healthy response to a stressful situation. Yoga is a mind-body activity that brings together physical activity, breathing control, meditation, and relaxation.

3. Dress to Sweat Less and Stress Less

Wearing loose-fitting clothes that breathes easily can help reduce sweating due to anxiety. Avoid tight-fitting clothing and artificial fabrics that aren’t absorbent and may constrict airflow. Don’t wear the same shoes every day and avoid socks made of cotton as they don’t wick away moisture. Wearing the right socks and changing them often will help keep sweaty feet at bay.

4. Limit “Sweat Triggers” from Your Diet

Your diet and blood sugar level can either help or hinder your efforts to control sweating due to anxiety. Here are some foods and beverages to avoid:

  • Stimulants, like caffeine, can put your nerves on edge. Minimize or eliminate coffee, tea, and caffeinated soft drinks.
  • Fatty, processed foods are low in fiber and harder to digest. Longer digestion times raise your body’s temperature and can trigger more perspiration.
  • Spicy foods.

5. Drink Your Water

Don’t skimp on your water consumption. Water contributes to just about every critical body function. When you don’t get enough water to keep your body running smoothly, it can lead to stress and anxiety. In fact, dehydration and stress go hand-in-hand. Stay hydrated to keep anxiety and sweat at bay.

6. Consider a Home Remedy

Home remedies for controlling sweat include herbal products like sage, chamomile, valerian root, and St. John’s Wort. When applied to the skin, apple cider vinegar is an astringent that can contract skin pores. Tomato juice is thought to have the same astringent effect as apple cider vinegar. Other natural treatments include tea tree oil (another astringent), fresh lemon rubbed on your underarms, and applying cornstarch, baking soda, or baby powder to sweaty areas. These remedies may be less effective if your sweat is caused by an anxiety disorder. But give them a try; they may work for you.

7. Splash Some Cool Water on Your Face and Wrists

Breaking away to a restroom for a few moments to splash some cool water on your face and wrists can help reduce profuse sweating caused by anxiety. Cooling your face and wrists signals the body that its internal temperature is okay. Also, taking, a minute or two away from the action will provide time to take a few deep breaths, slow down your breathing, and can help you relax.

8. Carry a Handkerchief or Baby Wipes

This is a simple but effective way of temporarily dealing with excessive sweat. When you experience forehead sweat or sweaty palms, a handkerchief can mop up profuse sweat before it becomes noticeable. If you can duck into a nearby restroom, a baby wipe can be used to clean up under your arms or wipe away nervous sweating.

9. Use a Prescription-Strength Antiperspirant

Applying a prescription-strength antiperspirant helps prevent sweat before it can cause you anxiety. A prescription-strength antiperspirant, like SweatBlock, can eliminate armpit sweat for up to 7 days. The powerful aluminum chloride ingredient blocks sweat glands and prevents perspiration from reaching the skin’s surface. Wetness and bad odor are prevented before they even happen. And now, there are specially formulated antiperspirant creams that can be applied to the hands and feet as well.

10. Anxiety Medications

If your profuse sweating is caused by stress, anxiety medication may help. Benzodiazepines are often prescribed for panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and social anxiety disorder. Brand names include Xanax, Librium, Klonopin, Valium, and Ativan.

11. Other More Invasive and Expensive Treatments

If none of these remedies are helping you, it may be time to consider other more complex treatments. These medical treatments can be expensive and require a doctor’s care.

Botox Injections

Botox is a neurotoxin made from botulism microbes. Botox injected directly into the areas where sweating is a problem blocks the nerves from communicating with the sweat glands. While effective, Botox injections must be repeated every 6 months or so to prevent chronic anxiety sweat.

Microwave Therapy

Microwave therapy makes use of a device that sucks sweat glands close to the surface of the skin and then destroys them with microwave energy. A qualified doctor must perform this procedure.

Anticholinergic Drugs

Anticholinergic drugs work to block the hormone the nervous system uses to send signals to your sweat glands. When the signals are blocked, you don’t experience sweating of any kind. These drugs are expensive and come with a number of unwanted side effects.

Sweat Gland Surgery

As a final and last resort, doctors can surgically remove your sweat glands from the sites most prone to excessive and uncontrolled sweating. There are some potentially serious drawbacks to this procedure, and that’s why it’s reserved for only the most serious cases.

Dealing with Anxiety Sweating

Everybody experiences anxiety from time to time. But when anxiety takes control of your life and leads to excessive sweating (which in turn causes more anxiety), there are steps you can take to minimize your stress and calm your sweat glands.

The information in this article should better inform and educate about anxiety sweating and what can be done to curtail or eliminate it. Seek to understand the cause of your anxiety and try these tips for reducing sweating and staying calm. One of these solutions is bound to work for you. Think how much better life could be when anxiety sweating is no longer a problem. With the help of these remedies, you’ll be able to calm your mind–and your sweat glands.

If you suffer from hyperhidrosis (also known as excessive sweating), you’ve likely heard of Iontophoresis. This unique hyperhidrosis treatment can be very effective in reducing the symptoms of hyperhidrosis.

We won’t lie, iontophoresis is a bit odd. For this reason, we’ve made a list of the most common questions about iontophoresis. Hopefully the answers will help you in your quest to stop unwanted sweat.

Iontophoresis

Iontophoresis: Frequently Asked Questions

  • 1. What is iontophoresis? Who invented it and when?
  • 2. How does iontophoresis therapy work?
  • 3. Does iontophoresis work for hyperhidrosis?
  • 4. How often should I have treatments?
  • 5. When will iontophoresis start working?
  • 6. What areas of the body can be treated with iontophoresis?
  • 7. Can iontophoresis work on my underarms?
  • 8. What is an iontophoresis patch and how does it work?
  • 9. Does iontophoresis hurt?
  • 10. Can I be electrically shocked by iontophoresis?
  • 11. Is the iontophoresis treatment permanent?
  • 12. Are there side effects from iontophoresis?
  • 13. Who performs iontophoresis?
  • 14. Will my insurance pay for iontophoresis?
  • 15. How much do iontophoresis treatments cost?
  • 16. What is the best iontophoresis machine for me?
  • 17. How much will an iontophoresis machine cost and where can I buy one?
  • 18. What if I’m pregnant? (and other iontophoresis contraindications)
  • 19. What other hyperhidrosis treatments can I try?

1. What is iontophoresis? Who invented it and when?

Iontophoresis is a medical procedure which uses a mild electrical current to gently push medications through the skin while the treated body area is submerged in water. You might think of it as an injection without a needle.

The procedure is most often used to treat hyperhidrosis or uncontrolled, profuse sweating. It can also be used to treat injuries related to sports by delivering anti-inflammatory medicines directly through the skin.

The idea of using weak electrical energy to deliver medicine dates back to the mid-18th century. Significant progress was made by several researchers in the 19th century and the concept gained serious traction soon after.

In the early 1900’s, Dr. Stéphan Leducafter, a French physician, published a series of scientific papers on the subject. Other contributors to the science were Benjamin Ward Richardson, Hermann Munk, William James Morton, and Fritz Frankenhäuser.

Recently, researchers have given iontophoresis a fancy new name: “electrically-assisted transdermal drug delivery.” This is what too many years of education can do. 😉

2. How does iontophoresis therapy work?

Iontophoresis works on the principle of ions. In this instance, the ions are water-soluble substances that carry either a positive or negative charge. Like the poles of a magnet, the positive electrode repels and the negative electrode attracts.

By running a mild galvanic (direct) current through a shallow container of water, an ion can be pushed into the skin if the active electrode has the same charge as the target ion.

The principle is the same as when two positive ends of a magnet push away from each other when they are placed together.

Because the skin is an excellent barrier and protects the body from outside intrusion, iontophoresis has limited value in delivering medications directly into the skin.

Generally speaking, a patient receiving iontophoresis treatment for hyperhidrosis sits with one or both hands or feet immersed in a shallow pan or tray filled with tap water.

Normally anticholinergic medicines are placed in the water that block the transmission of nerve signals to the sweat glands. By stimulating the iontophoresis electrodes, the electrical current “pushes” the medication into the skin. Treatments can last from 15 to 40 minutes.

3. Does iontophoresis work for hyperhidrosis?

The short answer is yes. While iontophoresis has limited usefulness in treating other conditions, it can be effective in treating certain types of primary or focal hyperhidrosis.

The procedure is routinely used for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating of the hands) and plantar hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating of the feet).

4. How often should I have treatments?

Always consult with your doctor before beginning a regimen of iontophoresis treatments. Usually, the process is repeated 3 times a week in the beginning, and until sweating is reduced to the desired degree. Then patients are switched to a schedule of one treatment each week.

To maintain effectiveness, treatments must be consistent and performed regularly before your sweating begins to return.

5. When will iontophoresis start working?

Patience is a virtue. That may not be a comforting thought as you deal with excessive, unrelenting sweating, but it’s important to keep in mind. How long it takes to see results varies significantly from person to person.

Some patients report positive results in the first day of treatment. For others, it may require three to four weeks of consistent treatment before the sweating is significantly reduced.

Most patients see a discernable difference by the end of the first week. If it’s going to work for you, that’s the benchmark to keep in mind. Long-term improvement is usually achieved after a few weeks of regular treatments.

6. What areas of the body can be treated with iontophoresis?

Iontophoresis has been used to treat hyperhidrosis since the 1940’s. Most medical studies have focused on the procedure for hyperhidrosis of the feet (plantar) and the hands (palmar). Fewer studies have examined hyperhidrosis of the armpits (axillary).

In one year-long study of 27 patients with palmoplantar hyperhidrosis (affecting the hands and feet), there was a “good” response. Desired improvement took from 2 to 4 weeks.

In every successful case, ongoing treatment was necessary to maintain dryness. When used correctly, iontophoresis can have a positive effect on 85% to 90% of hyperhidrosis patients.

7. Can iontophoresis work on my underarms?

The evidence collected so far shows that iontophoresis of the underarms might be an effective option for some people. The International Hyperhidrosis Society notes that iontophoresis is generally less effective than other methods for managing underarm sweating.

A clinical strength antiperspirant may be more effective in treating excessive underarm sweating.

8. What is an iontophoresis patch and how does it work?

An iontophoresis patch is an electrodynamic patch made from fabric material mingled with photovoltaic cells. Micro-currents are created by the transdermal patch when it comes in contact with the skin.

These currents use the iontophoresis principle to suppress the sweat glands from secreting sweat. Iontophoretic patches can be used on hands and feet, but are especially suited for underarm iontophoresis treatments.

A pouch containing a dosage of medication can be attached to an iontophoresis patch which delivers the medication directly through the skin.

Iontophoresis dexamethasone is a cortisone-like medication that is often used in conjunction with this treatment. It can provide relief from inflammation and helps prevent unwanted side effects.

Sometimes a Diclofenac gel is applied topically to reduce the inflammation.

The ActivaPatch is a self-contained single-use drug delivery patch that contains an electrical source (a battery), electrode and chamber into which desired medicines can be placed.

Once adhered to the skin in the desired location, it can provide up to 2.5 hours of iontophoresis treatment.

9. Does iontophoresis hurt?

No, iontophoresis treatments are not known to cause pain. But at the same time, it’s not what you would call “pleasant” either. When performed correctly, the treatment is rarely painful, though many patients report feeling mildly uncomfortable.

You will likely experience a tingling sensation during the process. Be sure you don’t have any open sores or wounds in the area to be treated.

The sensation will be much stronger if the current passes through open skin. You can cover any open skin with petroleum jelly to protect it.

10. Can I be electrically shocked by iontophoresis?

You can’t be seriously electrically shocked, but you may feel surprised by the tingling. The voltage of the electrical current used in iontophoresis is low and not strong enough to cause a harmful shock.

But if it’s not done correctly, or if you remove your hands or feet from the water during treatment– or if equipment malfunctions– the sensation might be a trifle unexpected.

You may temporarily experience minor heel pain during an improper foot treatment, for example. Be sure to remove any metal jewelry beforehand.

As the electrical current is increased, any unpleasant sensation will increase. But you’ll be in control and you’ll be able to decrease the current if the treatment becomes too uncomfortable.

It’s a good idea to have another person present during treatments. If you’re using an iontophoresis machine at home, be sure to completely read the manufacturer’s user guide and follow all suggested instructions and precautions.

11. Is the iontophoresis treatment permanent?

No, iontophoresis for hyperhidrosis is not a permanent solution. After the initial treatment period when the desired level of sweat reduction is achieved, maintenance treatments must be continued indefinitely (usually once a week).

It is important not to wait until the excessive sweating returns. Permanent hyperhidrosis treatments require more invasive treatments or surgical options.

12. Are there side effects from iontophoresis?

While iontophoresis is a safe and relatively pain-free treatment, some patients may experience some minor adverse effects. The good news is that any side effects are easily alleviated and generally not serious. The most common side effect is itching and drying of the skin.

Apply a moisturizing cream or lotion after each treatment to hydrate and soothe dry skin. Other possible side effects include blistering, skin irritation and peeling.

13. Who performs iontophoresis?

Many primary care or family practice doctors can administer the iontophoresis treatments. Some neurologists, internists, and surgeons will also offer the treatment. Seeking out a dermatologist will probably be your best bet.

After initial treatments performed by a qualified physician, it is not uncommon for patients to continue treatments at home with equipment that can be purchased for personal use.

14. Will my insurance pay for iontophoresis?

That depends on your insurance carrier. Sadly, iontophoresis for hyperhidrosis is a treatment that some insurance carriers consider unproven or investigational.

If that’s the case for you, you’ll have to pay out-of-pocket. Some physicians will allow you to negotiate the cost of treatment if your insurance will not cover it.

15. How much do iontophoresis treatments cost?

Iontophoresis treatments in a doctor’s office will set you back about $150 to $200 per session. Costs can vary significantly depending on the selected practitioner and location. It’s going to cost you more in Los Angeles than in Fargo, North Dakota.

If you decide to administer the treatments yourself after your initial doctor visits, you can purchase your own equipment. When you consider the cost of several treatments at the doctor’s office, this investment can be a cost-saving alternative.

16. What is the best iontophoresis machine for me?

The best machine for your specific condition depends on a lot of variables. Be aware that the manufacturer of any iontophoresis device is going to claim that their machine is the best. Here are important factors to consider when looking to purchase an iontophoresis machine for home use:

  • Affordability – Find a device that works within your budget. You’ll find many that will work.
  • Machine size – If the machine will be used at home, size may not be an issue. If you travel a lot, you’ll want something you can pack and take with you.
  • Safety – Find a machine that has safety features that eliminate the possibility of electrical shock.
  • Timers – The duration of treatments is critical to potential success. An onboard timer will be helpful in making sure treatments aren’t too short or too long.
  • Power source – Some machines are battery powered only. Replacing those batteries can be expensive.
  • Warranty and Service – Choose a machine that includes a warranty (at least 12 months) and be sure the manufacturer offers a user-friendly customer service program.

17. How much will an iontophoresis machine cost and where can I buy one?

A quality iontophoresis machine with basic features should cost somewhere between $500 – $700. If your budget won’t allow for an investment of several hundred dollars, there are low-cost machines available online starting at about $100.

Be cautious of low-priced machines, as safety features and build quality may have not been high on the maker’s priority list. Do your research. There are many choices available online, and they can also be purchased from local medical supply brick-and-mortar stores.

Also, if you’re handy, it’s fairly simple and easy to build one of your own.

18. What if I’m pregnant? (and other iontophoresis contraindications)

Always consult a doctor before commencing iontophoresis treatments. There are several conditions and situations for which either extra caution or total avoidance of the treatment are necessary.

  • If you wear a pacemaker – The electrical current used in iontophoresis, although mild, may interfere with a pacemaker.
  • Pregnancy – Iontophoresis has not been tested on pregnant women. If you’re pregnant, iontophoresis treatments are not recommended.
  • Metal orthopedic implants – Because electrical current will pass through the parts of the body being treated, any metal implants in those areas can cause problems. Talk to your physician about the treatment if you have any metal implants in your body.
  • Cardiac arrhythmia – Electrical impulses trigger your heart to beat. If you have an irregular heart condition, you should avoid iontophoresis unless your doctor specifically recommends it and supervises the treatment.
  • Skin rash or disease – Iontophoresis therapy should be avoided if a skin rash or skin disease is present in the affected areas.

19. What other hyperhidrosis treatments can I try?

Iontophoresis is considered a tier 3 treatment. That means there are other treatments for hyperhidrosis that are recommended before resorting to the use of an iontophoresis machine.

One of the most effective treatments for hyperhidrosis is a clinical strength antiperspirant like SweatBlock. It is highly effective for controlling underarm sweating, as well as hand, feet, and head sweating.

Clinical strength antiperspirants are not expensive, and they’re easy to use, and they’re readily available online and in local drugstores.

There are other hyperhidrosis treatments that may be worth considering. Many are more expensive and more invasive than iontophoresis. These include Botox injections, and using electromagnetic or microwave energy for killing sweat glands.

Irreversible surgery is also an option. Once again, talking with a doctor about your specific situation is the best course of action. He or she can prescribe the treatment that best suits you.

The Bottom Line

Iontophoresis is a widely accepted and proven treatment for sufferers of hyperhidrosis. Whether it’s a good treatment for you will depend on the seriousness of your sweating condition and other symptom relief treatments you may have already tried.

Now that you have a better understanding of iontophoresis, you’ll be able to make an informed decision about how best to treat your hyperhidrosis. You do have options, and the good news is that there’s a treatment that will likely work well for you. Don’t give up… life can be good again!

Do you struggle with nervous sweating? (aka anxiety sweating)

Does internal panic ensue at the slightest sign of sweat on your brow or the palms of your hands?

Do you melt with perspiration just thinking about your next social interaction?

It may not make you feel any better, but a lot of people experience this same kind of extreme, anxious sweating.

Some sweat is good… in fact, it’s critical to your health. But marathon-like sweating during a job interview or after a simple handshake is NOT good… EVER!

You should only sweat like you’ve just run a marathon… after running a marathon. Right?!

The truth is nervous sweat is a major distraction to living the life you want. It can negatively affect your career, social life, and relationships.

We think it’s unfair. Why should some people sweat more than others? Why does a pair of sweaty armpits get to dictate how you feel about yourself and how others feel about you?

If nervous sweat is a constant thorn in your side, here’s a few tips that might help calm your nerves and curb the sweat.

7 Ways to Stop Nervous Sweating

1. Don’t Panic

Don’t panic at the first drop of sweat. The fear of sweat is often the reason we end up sweating like a cold can of soda on sweltering day. The key is to prevent your body from switching into “fight or flight” mode. This survival mechanism will ultimately lead to increased breathing, blood flow, and sweating.

It may take some jedi mind trickery, but you need to FORGET the SWEAT. Convince yourself that sweat is no big deal and that your current situation (first date, job interview, etc…) doesn’t require you to run or fight for your life. Stay calm and don’t panic.

2. Relaxation + Meditation

When you feel a bit worked up, try a relaxation techniques to help you stay calm such as focusing on your breathing. Take slow, deep breaths, hold the breath in for a few seconds, and then, release it. Repeat the process until you feel calm again. Deep breathing slows down your heart rate, which in turn, helps prevent anxious sweating. Also, consider adding meditation sessions to your normal routine to help keep any unwanted stress at bay.

3. Exercise + Weight Loss

Regular exercise can help manage sweat-inducing stress. Less stress can result in less sweating. Another benefit of exercise is potential weight loss and increased confidence. The more confidence you have, the better you can handle potentially stressful situations.

4. Know your Sweat Triggers

Certain things can trigger excess sweat. Knowing these triggers can help you avoid sweaty situations and prepare for the unavoidable ones. Common sweat triggers include job interviews, dates and speaking in public. Some not-so-obvious triggers include caffeine, alcohol, spicy foods, and processed junk food. Medications, your clothes … even your very thoughts can trigger abnormal sweating. Know your sweat triggers and avoid them if possible.

5. Stay Hydrated

Drink plenty of H2O to keep your body temperature cool. This will reduce the amount of heat your body has to release in the form of sweat on your skin.

6. Be Prepared, Arm Yourself with a Strong Antiperspirant

Life happens. You can’t avoid every potentially stressful situation and you can’t live the rest of your days out in a cave. One way to combat nervous sweating is by using a clinical strength antiperspirant like SweatBlock. Unlike deodorants that simply mask odor, antiperspirants have the ability to block sweat. Arm yourself with a strong antiperspirant to reduce sweat and boost confidence.

Tip: Nervous sweat has a tendency to be stinky sweat. If you want to put a stop to the stink and the sweat, try a combination antiperspirant deodorant.

7. Dress Strategically

The strategy here is to dress in a way that doesn’t produce more sweat and doesn’t promote nervous sweat. Wear light, breathable fabrics that keep you cool. Wear patterns, darks, blacks or light jackets to hide sweat. Don’t promote your sweaty armpits by wearing solid colors, grays, and light blues. For sweaty hands and face, keep a handkerchief handy. You can quickly wipe away sweat before it compounds into extreme sweat.

Why We Sweat When We’re Nervous

Any type of excessive sweating can be embarrassing, but nervous sweating is probably the worst. Just think about it for a minute.

Have you ever…

  • Dealt with clammy hands on a first date?
  • Had beads of sweat appear all over your forehead before giving an important presentation at work?
  • Felt really anxious about something, and then, noticed that your feet are suddenly sliding around in puddles of sweat?

It’s not fun. But you don’t have to stop living your life to the fullest because of it either. Instead, learn more about why you’re prone to nervous sweating and how to deal with it once and for all.

Can Being Nervous Cause Sweating?

When you’re nervous it activates your stress hormones. And when activated, those hormones cause your body temperature and heart rate to increase slightly. This sends a message to your sweat glands telling them it’s time to produce sweat to cool your body off a bit.

Unfortunately, this isn’t a process that you can control. The best thing you can do to avoid nervous sweating completely is to practice different stress and anxiety-relieving techniques, such as deep breathing, to keep yourself as calm as possible. If you do this every time you start to feel nervous, stressed, or anxious, there’s a good chance you can prevent nervous sweating altogether. But if it doesn’t work, there are plenty of other things you can try too.

What Causes Nervous Sweating?

When it comes to being nervous, anxious, or stressed, everyone has their own triggers. You might become really nervous before an important meeting or before you have to give a big speech, while others may be really nervous when they meet someone for the first time or any time they go on a date. Of course, if you’re in a situation that makes you nervous, the last thing you want to do is start sweating profusely.

Unfortunately, all of these feelings send red flags to your body telling it that you’re on the brink of overheating. So your body starts producing extra sweat in an effort to stay cool. It’s a completely natural process that’s totally annoying and embarrassing.

When you know you’ll be faced with a circumstance that’s a trigger for you, do everything you can to remain calm. The calmer you stay, the less likely you are to start sweating. We know this can be hard to do. To help, wipe your problem areas down with a SweatBlock towelette in advance if possible. This will reduce the amount of sweat your body produces, giving you one less thing to be stressed about.

Which Nervous System Controls Sweating?

The sympathetic nervous system controls sweating. It’s part of the autonomic nervous system, which controls your body functions that you don’t consciously direct such as your heartbeat and breathing.

The sympathetic nervous system is the portion of the autonomic nervous system that triggers your body’s fight-or-flight response. So any time you’re nervous, scared, anxious, or stressed, it tells your sweat glands to start working so that you don’t overheat internally. Basically, this system works to protect you from the inside out.

How to Treat Nervous Sweating

There are several ways to treat nervous sweating, but there isn’t one treatment or remedy that works for everyone. So it’s important to try different types of treatments until you find one that works for your body. For most people, it’s a combination of home remedies or antiperspirants and prevention techniques.

How to Calm Nervous Sweating

The key to calming nervous sweating is calming yourself. You can’t control the amount of sweat your body produces, but you can control the way you feel — to an extent. There are two ways you should approach this problem.

First, you should try to work on the reason you’re nervous in certain situations. For example, if you get so nervous during dates that you get really sweaty hands, you might want to try working on your confidence. Consider making it a point to talk to strangers casually as much as possible. Eventually, you’ll start feeling comfortable and confident holding conversations with people you don’t know well. The added confidence you gain can help stay calm on your next date. The same technique can be used if you’re nervous about speaking in front of an audience. Practice your speeches at home, in front of friends and family members, and work your way up to speaking in front of larger crowds.

In addition to working on the main causes of your nervousness, you should practice calming techniques. These can help calm you down any time you find yourself in a situation that makes you feel nervous.

Take slow, deep breaths until you feel yourself calm down.

Remove yourself from the situation for a few minutes to give yourself time to calm down.

Practice mindfulness meditation to focus on the present. This allows you to focus on the moment realistically, instead of focusing on your fears or expectations surrounding the moment. To do this, focus on specific sights or sounds nearby. This brings you back into the present moment and gets you out of your head.

How to Stop Nervous Sweating Naturally

To stop nervous sweating naturally, the best thing to do is work on your mindset. You get nervous because you have specific thoughts, expectations, or fears surrounding certain tasks or events. For example, if you constantly think that other people are judging you or have a bad perception of you, it may make you nervous to speak in front of groups or meet new people. It’s thoughts like these that are rooted in your anxiety. If you make a conscious effort to flip the negative thoughts into positive ones, you’ll start to feel more confident and are less likely to become nervous.

Additionally, you can try different home remedies designed to keep you calm such as:

Eat more fish. Omega-3 fatty acids work to protect against depression and anxiety.

Eat a protein-filled breakfast every day. Low levels of choline are associated with increased anxiety, and eating protein at breakfast helps regulate your levels throughout the day.

Grab a snack. Anxiety and nervousness often set in when your blood sugar levels are a bit low, so grab a quick snack.

Exercise regularly. When you exercise on a regular basis it helps eliminate lingering depression and anxiety. It makes you feel healthier, which automatically boosts your self-esteem.

Preventing Nervous Sweating on the Face

When your nervous sweat appears on your head, face, or neck, it’s hard to hide — which of course, makes it even more embarrassing. Fortunately, there are a few things you can do to help prevent nervous sweating on your face.

Our top recommendation for head, face, and neck sweating is using SweatBlock — and no we aren’t just tooting our own horn. It actually does work. Before you go to bed at night, wipe down your face and neck with a SweatBlock towelette. Then, go to sleep and let SweatBlock work its magic. When you’re sleeping, your sweat glands aren’t as active. So the clinical-strength antiperspirant on the towelette can easily get into your pores. While one nighttime treatment is enough to reduce the amount of sweat you produce for between four and seven days, you can also carry a SweatBlock towelette with you — just in case.

Speaking of towelettes, you can also carry alcohol wipes with you to use in the event of an emergency. If a situation arises that makes you nervous, quickly wiping down your face with an alcohol wipe will close your pores so excessive amounts of sweat can’t escape. If you wear makeup, consider wiping your face down with an alcohol wipe before applying your makeup to close your pores. Keep in mind though, alcohol is very drying. You might want to also use a lightweight moisturizer to keep your skin hydrated properly.

You should also drink plenty of water throughout the day to stay hydrated. When your body is properly hydrated, your body temperature doesn’t rise as easily. And because you produce sweat when your body temperature starts to rise, it’s important to keep your internal temperature as cool as possible to prevent sweating. Also, avoid eating food that’s spicy, hot, or filled with sodium. They automatically make your body temperature rise a bit.

If you can’t find a natural remedy for nervous sweating on your head, neck, or face, you might consider getting botox treatments. When used to treat excessive sweating, botox treatments are done a bit differently than they are when they are used to get rid of wrinkles and age lines. The botox gets injected at specific points, numbing the nerves in the area completely. This way, when your brain tries to signal the nerves to produce sweat, it doesn’t work.

Dealing with Sweaty Hands

It’s common for people struggling with nervous sweating to get clammy hands regularly. This can make a simple handshake practically unbearable. Unfortunately, if the thought of shaking someone’s hand makes you panic, you automatically produce more sweat. And because there are more sweat glands in the palms of your hands than other areas of your body, your hands can get sweaty real quick.

Basically, it’s a Catch-22. The more you worry about your clammy hands, the more they sweat. So what do you do? Well, you don’t have let the thought of having sweaty hands deter you. Instead, follow these tips to reduce the amount of sweat your hands produce.

1. Carry Alcohol Wipes

Wipe your hands with alcohol wipes to dry out your hands before important social interactions. It’s a very temporary fix, but it may just help you avoid some akward handshakes and handholding. Alcohol based hand sanitizers can also work.

2. Try Hand Antiperspirant

Want a more effective treatment for sweaty hands? Try a topical antiperspirant cream or lotion. We recommend our specialized SweatBlock hand antiperspirant.

3. Use Body Powder to Absorb Hand Sweat

If you feel like your hands are starting to get clammy, rub a bit of body powder between them to absorb any excess moisture. Consider carrying a travel-size bottle with you or keeping one in your desk at work to use as needed.

4. Soak your hands in vinegar

Soak your hands in a mixture of warm water and white vinegar two to three times per week for about 20 minutes. The warm water opens your pores, allowing the white vinegar to work its way into them. When you remove your hands from the mixture, run them under cold water for about 20 seconds to close your pores back up. The white vinegar helps reduce the amount of sweat your palms produce and closing up the pores when you’re done, prevent sweat from seeping out of them. This is also a good option for anyone with excessively sweaty feet.

How to Combat Nervous Sweating in Public

If you’re worried about nervous sweating in public situations, it’s important to do whatever you can to reduce the amount of sweat your body produces before you leave your home. The more prepared you are, the easier it is to avoid profuse sweating in public, and if it does happen, you won’t need to worry because you’ve already prepared yourself to hide it.

Wear an undershirt beneath your clothing to trap excess sweat before it can stain your outer layer of clothing. This helps prevent embarrassing pit stains or sweat stains on other parts of your clothes.

Wear sweat guards underneath your clothes. Sweat guards are made to sit in the armpit area of your shirt. They absorb excess sweat so that it doesn’t stain your clothing and isn’t noticeable to people around you.

Use clinical-strength antiperspirant. You can purchase a deodorant that includes a clinical-strength antiperspirant to use on your underarm area. Or you can purchase antiperspirant wipes, such as SweatBlock, to use on other areas of your body.

Do your best to stay out of the heat and sun. The cooler you are, the less sweat your body produces. So you don’t want to do anything that causes you to sweat more.

Discuss Nervous Sweating With Your Doctor

It’s common for people battling nervous sweating to avoid talking to others about it because they are embarrassed or feel alone. But the condition is actually really common, and your doctor may be able to help you with the problem.

In most cases, doctors and dermatologists suggest that their patients try different remedies before they prescribe medication. But if you’ve already exhausted every home remedy you know and clinical-strength antiperspirant isn’t working, it might be time for a prescription.

Because your excessive sweating is caused by your nervousness, your doctor may suggest an anti-depressant or anti-anxiety medication to help regulate your moods.

There are also oral prescription medications that reduce the amount of sweat you produce, but your doctor may feel that a topical prescription medication is the better option for you.

Topical prescription meds come in cream form and can be applied as needed. So before you go into a situation that you know will make you nervous, simply apply the cream to the areas of your body that sweat the most. The cream works in the same way as an alcohol wipe or SweatBlock towelettes. It closes the pores and dries up the area to keep it sweat free. The only difference is that instead of being clinical strength, the medication is prescription strength, which is why it’s typically used only when other options aren’t working.

Ultimately, the key to combating nervous sweating is to do whatever you can to remain as calm as possible. If that’s not possible, you should try a combination of natural treatments to combat your excessive sweating. And if all else fails, consult your doctor. He or she may be able to prescribe medication that helps prevent you from sweating so much.

With all the women’s antiperspirant brands out there, it can be difficult find the one that works best for you.

If you sweat more than the average woman, then you already know that some of these so-called “best antiperspirants for women” hardly work at all!

You’ve probably tried different deodorants, antiperspirants and other sweat remedies. And while some of them may smell nicer than others, nothing seems to provide the sweat relief you are looking for. Right?

This is why you need to be a little more prudent when trying to find the best antiperspirant. Here’s a few things to consider when choosing the best antiperspirant for you.

What’s the Best Women’s Antiperspirant? 6 Things to Consider

1) Do You Want to Stop Sweat or Stop Body Odor?

What do you actually want to do? Stop sweaty underarms or get rid of stinky armpits? Or both? It’s important to get clear on your goal. Many women would say “both”. Others might just want to cover up body odor or stop embarrassing sweat stains. Here’s the thing, antiperspirant will control sweat, deodorant will mask foul body odor. Understanding the differences between antiperspirant and deodorant will help you figure out the best solution for you.

Do you want to stop excessive sweating? Choose a strong antiperspirant. If you’re just trying get through the day without smelling like a jungle woman, go with your favorite women’s deodorant. But honestly, using deodorant and antiperspirant will get you the best results (staying dry, smelling fresh).

Here’s a little tip: Apply antiperspirant at night to clean, dry armpits. Then apply your deodorant the following morning. This trick will keep your underarms dry and odor free throughout the day. Antiperspirant deodorant combos aren’t nearly as effective as applying the two separately.

2) What is the active ingredient?

The first important step to finding the best antiperspirant for women is to eliminate all the options that are NOT true antiperspirants. This includes all the deodorants that are designed to merely mask the scent of body odor.

A true antiperspirant uses active ingredients like aluminum chloride that can block sweat. When considering antiperspirant options, look for something that has at least 12% Aluminum chloride. This will give you the best chance at stopping unwanted sweat.

Whats the most effective antiperspirant for women? Honestly, the best antiperspirants will work for both men and women. Men and women both have sweat glands that operate on the same set of biological rules. Stress, high temperatures, physical activity, or hyperhidrosis will make anyone sweat… regardless of gender.

3) Does it work? Is it highly rated/recommended?

Thanks to Amazon, Facebook, and other social platforms – we can learn quickly what products work and which ones don’t. Do a quick search on Amazon or Google and you’ll find thousands of reviews for antiperspirants.

Choose an antiperspirant that has a high number of customer reviews and no lower than a 4 out 5 star rating. This means that the antiperspirant has been tested on a large scale and the results are reliable. A 5-star antiperspirant with 3 customer reviews should probably be avoided.

When comparing antiperspirants, take the time to look for feedback from customers who have tried the product first-hand. Read some of the good reviews and read some of the bad. Not every product works for everyone. But reading reviews can help you get an idea of who is using the product and how they get the best results.

4) Is it safe?

You want to be sure that the antiperspirant you’re applying to your skin is safe to use – regardless of what the manufacturer claims. Do your homework to find out if the product has been independently evaluated and recommended by prominent medical professionals. Look for antiperspirants that have been FDA approved or use FDA approved formulas.

5) Does it have a money-back guarantee?

There’s no reason why you should be wasting money endlessly on antiperspirants. Stick to products that offer a money-back guarantee.

This not only ensures that you’ll get a refund if you’re not satisfied by the results, but also, it’s a sign that the manufacturer stands by the quality of its product and cares about its customers.

6) Is it strong enough for extreme sweating?

If you suffer from excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis), traditional drug store antiperspirant just won’t cut it.

Nobody understands the embarrassment of sweating more than hyperhidrosis sufferers. Women (and men) with this condition sweat profusely regardless of physical activity or emotional state. The sweat just comes… and most of the time it comes without warning or explanation.

If you suffer from hyperhidrosis, you need a strong antiperspirant. SweatBlock clinical strength antiperspirant was tested on the Rachael Ray show. It had no problem stopping sweat for firefighters, yet it continues to be a popular antiperspirant choice for women.

Here’s just a few of the reviews from women who use SweatBlock:

The best antiperspirant I’ve ever ordered from Amazon – Cristina

“I just got SweatBlock the other day and it has already been life-changing. I always sweat through my clothes, can’t tell you how many shirts I’ve ruined. The biggest problem I have is work clothes – those silk type button up shirts from express, nice blouses, dresses, etc…always ruined or just embarrassing walking around with sweat stains. I keep a fan on at work, and always wear a sweater to hide my sweat, or I’m running into the bathroom to try to dry up with paper towels. I tried a “life hack” I read and tried sticking panty liners in my shirts for awhile…but once they got wet they’d just fall off (even more embarrassing than sweat stains are random wet panty linters falling out of your shirt).”

“I actually stumbled across SweatBlock because I was looking for the sweat guards you can sew into your clothes for a more permanent solution. I read the glowing reviews on this product and since I have prime I was able to get it the next day so I figured I’d try this first. I followed the directions and dabbed one of the pads in my armpits. I made sure to dab the whole area and get the sides, a little on my back – just everywhere in that area where I sweat. I let it dry while I brushed my teeth, and put on a sweatshirt and laid down in bed to read a book. I woke up the next morning thinking I had screwed it up because usually when I accidentally fall asleep in a sweatshirt I sweat all night. I was pleasantly surprised when I noticed my sweatshirt wasn’t wet! I went to work that morning in a sweater I usually sweat through and didn’t have any issues all day! I was SHOCKED. The armpit areas of this sweater always get soaked but I’m able to hide it by keeping my arms down. I couldn’t believe I didn’t have to do that this time.”

Sweat, I Banish You! – Shannon

“I have been using SweatBlock for about a month now. The results of this product have exceeded my expectations. I have been living my life as an excessive sweater since middle school. I would always wear sweatshirts to cover up my sweat stains and learned to accept this uncomfortable feeling physically and emotionally. Entering my career in an office setting gave me anxiety because I knew dressing professionally would mean that I would not be able to wear what I want, or suffer the consequences of embarrassing sweat stains. All the money I spent on clothes that were quickly ruined by yellow deodorant stains were costing me a fortune. All the time I spent in the bathroom trying to dry my shirts was affecting my productivity at work. I couldn’t even go to a meeting or have a conversation with my boss, a coworker, or a client with out sweat running down my arms. I had enough! I was researching getting Botox injections to help with my excessive sweating when I came across SweatBlock. I figured I would give it a try as my last resort option.”

“The first week I used the product I was applying it every night after the first 3 or 4 days. I used the same wipe for 3 applications. I was still sweating but not as much. I ordered a Thompson Tee thinking I would still need some extra protection. I started applying Certain DRI as my normal deodorant in the morning. THE SWEAT STOPPED! I returned that Thompson Tee without having to wear it once! I have regained my confidence in the workplace even in the most stressful of situations. I am not constantly thinking about how I move my arms and trying to hide my sweat stains. I can buy clothes and not worry about having to throw them out within in a month because of yellow deodorant stains.”

This Product is Amazing! – Lorena

“This product is amazing! I was diagnosed with hyperhidrosis when i was 16 and nothing worked i thought i would give this a shot. To my surprise i applied it as directed with much doubt but it works! I did not have to reapply (i thought as much as i sweat i would surely have to reapply more than the directed once a week) but its working. Im in shock that finally at 37 years old i can wear what i want raise my arms, its so freeing.”

SweatBlock literally changed my life – Kim

“I had tried everything- prescription antiperspirant, prescription medications, natural products, bulky stick on sweat pads, and clinical strength products. Nothing really worked and I had just resigned myself to picking clothes based on whether they would hide my sweat stains. A friend recommended SweatBlock, and I figured I didn’t have anything to lose. It is amazing! I immediately had a significant reduction in perspiration and was even able to wear a light color shirt for the first time in years! I have been a loyal user ever since and recommend it to everyone.”

SweatBlock has worked wonders! – Emi

“I was never a big sweater, but once I got laser hair removal on my armpits , I was like a POOL under there. Sweaty, smelly, all things I never experienced before! So of course, I googled for a remedy that wasn’t Botox and I came across Sweat Block! My order came VERY quickly and I’ve been using it for two weeks now and, I have to say, they work! I work out a few times a week and do hip hop and Zumba and, even though I may still sweat, there’s really NO SMELL! Nothing is going to stop you from sweating fully unless you do something invasive, but Sweat Block really has worked wonders for me and I’m grateful. I’m on my 3rd box !! Highly recommend.”

There are 4-5 million sweat glands on the human body. Over 250,000 of those sweat glands reside on your feet. It’s no surprise that sweat and stink find their way between your toes and in your tennis shoes.

The smell, slipping, sliding, blisters and infection are just a few of the side effects of sweaty feet. For those who suffer with plantar hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating of the feet), things only get worse.

18 Ways to Stop Sweaty Feet

If you’re tired of soggy socks and toe-curling foot odor, follow these tips to help prevent sweaty and stinky feet.

1. Wash your feet daily

Wash your feet daily with an antibacterial soap. Dirty, sweaty feet attract bacteria which can lead to foot odor.

2. Stop Sweat with Foot Antiperspirant

With all those sweat glands hanging out on your feet, sweat can come fast and furious. A strong antiperspirant for feet is one of the best ways to stop unwanted sweat.

3. Use a Foot Deodorant Spray

Stinky feet go hand-in-hand with with sweaty feet. Once you get foot sweat under control with a foot antiperspirant, de-stink your feet with a foot deodorant spray. The best foot deodorants can be directly applied to smelly feet and stinky shoes.

4. Use Foot Powder to Keep Feet Dry & Fungus Free

After cleaning your feet, apply an anti-fungal foot powder. This will help reduce wetness from sweat and control foot odor.

5. Use an Alcohol Wipe Reduce Sweating

Wipe down your feet with an alcohol wipe to close up your pores and reduce sweating temporarily. Do this before you put on your socks and shoes for the day.

6. Use Cornstarch to Absorb Sweat and Keep Feet Dry

Like foot powders, cornstarch can absorb sweat and keep your feet dry and comfortable. Sprinkle clean feet with cornstarch and let sit for a few minutes before putting on shoes and socks.

7. Put Baking Soda in Your Shoes

After you remove your shoes, put some baking soda in them to soak up excess moisture. This prevents nasty smelling bacteria from festering.

8. Choose the Right Shoes

Wear breathable shoes if possible. Shoes with poor ventilation won’t do your sweaty feet any favors. Avoid plastic and leather shoes. And … always wear socks. (but never with sandals. PLEASE!)

9. Keep Shoes Dry to Prevent Bacteria Build-up

Alternate shoes to give them time to dry out. Dry shoes are less likely to be stinky shoes.

10. Wear Socks, Wear the Right Socks

If you’re wearing closed toe-shoes, you need to wear socks — clean, dry, socks. Change your socks daily and avoid wearing cotton socks. The best socks for sweaty feet are going to be breathable, moisture-wicking socks. Wool, bamboo, and anti-bacterial materials are all good options for preventing sweaty feet.

11. Diet and Exercise

Eating a healthy diet and avoiding spicy, processed, fatty foods can help reduce sweating. More water and less coffee (or caffeine) can also help.

Foot sweating is largely influenced by emotional stress. So, keeping stress to a minimum is in your best interest. Regular exercise and relaxation techniques can help manage stress before it turns into pools of sweat in your shoes.

12. Soaking Feet in Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is a great home remedy for sweaty feet and stinky feet. It’s a natural astringent (tightens skin and closes pores) which can help reduce sweat — just like an antiperspirant. But it also keeps foot odor away with its antifungal and antibacterial properties.

Use a cotton ball to apply the vinegar to problem areas of your feet or you can do an apple cider vinegar soak. Mix 1 part apple cider vinegar, 1 part water, and 1/2 part baking soda in a large bowl or basin. Then soak for your feet for 15-20 minutes. This also works for sweaty hands.

13. Soaking Feet in Tea (Black or Sage Tea)

Like apple cider vinegar, black and sage tea are natural astringents. Many people claim that sage tea is one of the best remedies for sweaty feet and sweaty hands.

Just add 4 – 5 tea bags to a quart of boiling water. Once cooled, soak your feet for 15-20 minutes. Some report that drinking the tea can also be helpful in combating foot sweat.

14. Exfoliate Feet

This is more of a stinky feet remedy. Exfoliation is the process of removing dead skin cells from your body. Odor causing bacteria love to feed on these dead skin cells. Use an exfoliating brush or glove on your feet 2-3 times a week to help keep bacteria away.

15. Lemon Juice

Use cotton balls to apply fresh lemon juice to the soles of your feet before putting on your shoes and socks. It helps to close your pores and prevent sweating. Lemon juice can also work as a natural deodorant.

16. Prescription Strength Antiperspirant

Clinical strength antiperspirants can be very effective in treating hand and foot sweating. Antiperspirant works by plugging up your pores and blocking sweat. By blocking the sweat, it can also prevent bad foot odor.

17. Iontophoresis Treatment

If antiperspirant doesn’t stop foot perspiration, Iontophoresis might be a good option. It’s been used for over 50 years to treat excessive sweating of the hands and feet. Iontophoresis works by using electrical currents to drive medication into the skin surface. It’s similar to an injection, but without the needles. Iontophoresis machines can be purchased and used in home. (cost ranges from $300-$1000)

18. Botox Injections (Botulinum Toxin)

Botox injections temporarily block the chemicals that activate the nerves that cause sweating. Affected areas of your feet will receive enough injections to ensure that all the nerves have been treated. The desired effects will last 3-4 months. Then treatments must be repeated. Botox injections for plantar hyperhidrosis (excessive foot sweating) can be very painful.

What Causes Sweaty Feet?

Sweating is an essential part of our body’s cooling system. To regulate body temperature, the body releases excess heat via sweat glands in the form of sweat. Our feet are not exempt from this process.

In fact, our feet have more sweat glands per inch than any other part of the body. That’s over 250,000 sweat glands on just your feet. The feet alone will produce roughly half a pint of sweat daily.

So, even if you don’t have an extreme sweating problem, you’ll likely still sweat quite a bit on your feet.

But there are things that can cause more-than-normal sweating on your feet. Your genes, for example, could be the main reason you sweat more than normal (thanks a lot mom and dad).

Your shoes, socks, diet, and emotional stress levels can also dictate how much your feet sweat.

One thing to note is that sweat glands on the soles of your feet respond mostly to your emotions. So people who are prone to anxiety, get nervous easily or have a lot of emotional stress are more likely to have sweaty feet.

For some people, foot sweat flows in niagra-like proportions. For others, sweating is unpredictable and happens regardless of physical activity or temperature. This type of extreme sweating is called Plantar Hyperhidrosis (or excessive foot sweating).

According to the Mayo Clinic, “Hyperhidrosis is abnormally excessive sweating that’s not necessarily related to heat or exercise.”

The most common types of hyperhidrosis are:

  • Craniofacial Hyperhidrosis (Head and Face Sweating)
  • Axillary Hyperhidrosis (Sweaty Armpits)
  • Palmar Hyperhidrosis (Sweaty Palms & Hands)
  • Plantar Hyperhidrosis (Sweaty Feet)

Think you might have plantar hyperhidrosis? Consult with your doctor about possible causes and best treatment options. Hyperhidrosis could be a side effect of certain medications or a symptom of more serious health conditions (i.e. diabetes, cancer, heart failure)

What Causes Stinky Feet?

Sweat isn’t the sole contributor to foul smelling foot odor. When the bacteria on your skin mingles with sweat, it causes that “stinky feet” smell (bromhidrosis).

For most people, the odor doesn’t start out strong. But over time, the smell gets locked into your shoes, and then, mixes with more sweat and bacteria.

Sweat + Bacteria = Stinky Feet

If you’re prone to anxiety or your hormones are out of whack, it only exacerbates the sweating and odor. That’s why teenagers have such sweet smelling feet (sarcasm alert).

How to prevent sweaty feet in shoes

If you wear tennis shoes, loafers, or similar closed-toe shoes, it’s important to keep them clean and dry. Sweat and odor can build up as you sweat each day. Alternating your shoes every day can give them time to dry out and reduce bacteria.

To help keep your feet from sweating while wearing this type of shoe, consider putting a bit of baby powder into your socks.

If you prefer, you can also use anti fungal foot powder, which you can purchase at amazon or most drug stores. It will help absorb the moisture and odor causing bacteria.

Also, when you take the shoes off, put a bit of baking soda inside them to absorb left-behind moisture and neutralize the smell.

There are also stinky shoe home remedies you can try if your favorite pair of sneakers are already smelling a bit ripe. We recommend things like deodorizing sprays, tea bags and even old socks filled with cat litter.

How to prevent sweaty feet in flats and heels

If you have overly sweaty feet, you probably avoid wearing flats because they aren’t worn with socks — which helps keep moisture at bay. And of course, when it comes to heels, your options are pretty much limited to strappy dress sandals or nothing. Don’t worry! You don’t have to avoid those cute ballet flats or edgy stilettos anymore.

Try soaking your feet in a 1:1 mixture of white vinegar and hot water three times per week to keep the smell away. Then, apply rubbing alcohol to the bottom of your feet before putting on your flats to help close the pores and prevent sweating. You can also use SweatBlock antiperspirant towelettes instead of rubbing alcohol.

Common Problems Caused by Sweaty Feet

Did you know sweaty feet can actually cause other problems? Basically, when your feet sweat a lot, they end up sitting in excess moisture all day long.

It’s the perfect environment for infection to breed — and some of them are pretty darn serious! And, if you have excessively sweaty feet, you’re probably more prone getting warts and blisters too.

Can sweaty feet cause athlete’s foot?

Sweat doesn’t cause athlete’s foot, but sweaty feet could lead to it if you aren’t careful. Athlete’s foot is actually a fungal infection. It’s caused when the bacteria on your feet mingles with moisture for too long.

You’re more likely to get athlete’s foot if you wear wet shoes and socks for long periods of time. By taking steps to prevent your feet from sweating too much, you lower the risk of getting athlete’s foot immensely.

Keep in mind, athlete’s foot is really easy to catch if you come in contact with the fungus directly — and because you have naturally sweaty feet, the infection is more likely to grow and spread.

So instead of going barefoot outside, at the gym, in public showers, and at swimming pools, wear flip-flops to protect your feet!

Can sweaty feet cause itching?

When most people think of skin itching, they think of dry skin. But moisture can make your skin itch too. So yes, excess sweat can cause your feet to itch. However, once you’ve washed and dried your feet, the itching should stop. The only exception to this rule would be if the added moisture causes the skin on your feet to dry out.

Keep in mind, excess sweat isn’t the only thing that can cause your feet to itch. Athlete’s foot, allergic reactions, and scabies are also common causes. So if your feet itch a lot or itch consistently, regardless of what you do, you should have a doctor examine you.

Can sweaty feet cause trench foot?

Trench foot is a serious condition that’s caused by prolonged exposure to cold and wetness. But because it depends more on the water exposure than the cold, it’s possible for people to get trench foot in the dessert too. This condition can cause nerve damage and low blood circulation, which could result in amputation if not treated.

However, you have to remember that it’s prolonged exposure to moisture that causes it. That means it takes awhile to develop. Basically, you won’t get trench foot from wearing sweaty tennies one day. You can avoid this condition by removing wet shoes and socks as soon as possible, and then, cleanse and dry your feet.

Wrap Up

Sweaty feet aren’t fun. And the resulting foot odor is even less fun. Try some of the tips above and grab yourself a foot antiperspirant like this one. If you don’t get the results you’re looking for, talk to your doctor about Botox Injections or Iontophoresis Treatment.