Sweltering summer weather. Intense workouts. First dates. Test jitters.

Sweaty boobs.

It’s true – lots of situations can send your sweat glands into overdrive. When our sweat glands are really working, we can sweat just about anywhere on our bodies – and the very worst kind of sweat may be boob sweat.

Boob sweat is absolutely normal, and most women experience it at some point. If you’re curious about how to prevent boob sweat, here’s a few helpful tips.

boob sweat

10 Ways to Prevent Boob Sweat

  • 1. Find the Right Bra
  • 2. Wear a Lot of Black
  • 3. Go for Cotton
  • 4. Wear Looser Clothing
  • 5. Use Moroccan Argan Oil
  • 6. Try Sweat Pads or Liners
  • 7. Apply an Antiperspirant
  • 8. Carry Body Wipes
  • 9. Use an Anti-Chafing Powder
  • 10. Don’t Forget Anti-Chafing Gels and Creams

Boob sweat can be annoying and embarrassing – but the good news is that it’s also controllable. Keep reading to find out more about how to battle underboob sweat and keep those beads of sweat from pooling in your bra.

Why Do Boobs Sweat?

While boobs are generally great, one downside is that anytime skin touches skin, it creates the potential to block sweat evaporation. This makes the area under or between the breasts prone to sweat accumulation – especially for large breasts or those that droop (darn gravity!). The combination of hot, humid weather, friction, and poor air circulation under boobs can conspire to make stinky boob sweat a serious problem.

Sometimes, though, boob sweat is caused by hormonal issues instead of environmental ones. If you’re unexpectedly sweating more than usual or if you notice a new boob sweat smell, you may want to talk to your dermatologist.

In addition to feeling embarrassed and uncomfortable, boob sweat can also lead to more serious concerns like chafing or underboob rash. Symptoms of an underboob sweat rash include red skin that’s itchy and irritable, along with a burning sensation or broken skin.

Fortunately, you don’t have to suffer from any of these conditions. Let’s explore more in detail how to stop boob sweat and prevent these uncomfortable side effects.

10 Ways to Prevent Boob Sweat

1. Find the Right Bra

The fit and material of your bra are extremely important – and the best bra for boob sweat is ultimately a personal choice. Especially during the hottest summer months, a lightweight bra can keep your girls from overheating. A bra should be comfortable and offer good support – a tight, uncomfortable underwire bra can make you more susceptible to chafing. Your bra should lift your breasts away from your chest and also keep your breasts from rubbing against each other. This can make sure your skin is as aerated as possible. The good news is that bra manufacturers are getting wise to dealing with boob sweat, so they’re starting to make more sweat-wicking options available.

Try to find materials that are as breathable as possible. During the summer season, a good, supportive bra made of cotton is often best. Some women prefer mesh bras, which are thin and usually unpadded. The mesh material wicks away moisture, ensuring that sweat evaporates rather than pooling between your boobs or oozing down to your belly button. Spacer bras, or those made from specially formulated breathable materials, can also be effective options. And while they may feel sexy, silky underwear bras that are tight, lacy or padded can increase your chances for boob sweat by constricting your girls – so say goodbye to them if sweating becomes a problem.

Some women find sports bras an effective option, but be careful. Traditional sports bra materials are often too thick or bulky for excessive sweating. Something in a breathable, moisture-wicking fabric will work better.

Make sure to wear a clean, new bra every day (don’t act like you haven’t worn yours multiple days in a row– we’ve all done it). Especially during hot summer months, make sure to avoid wearing a bra without washing it first. Smelly boob sweat doesn’t get better with age.

2. Wear a Lot of Black

Black hides sweat and unseemly wet spots better than any other color you can wear, so it’s a great option when facing a sweaty day. It won’t stop the boob sweat, but it can cut down on the embarrassment if you sweat through your shirt. In fact, sweat is practically invisible on black clothing.

3. Go for Cotton

As a light and naturally breathable fabric, cotton can help keep heat and sweat from being trapped under cleavage. The only con is that once it’s wet, cotton takes a long time to completely dry out, so be warned.

4. Wear Looser Clothing

When it comes to boob sweat prevention, air is your best friend. The looser your blouse, the more air you allow to move through and help sweat evaporate. Conversely, tight tops only serve to trap both moisture and heat. The tighter your top, the more likely it is for sweaty spots to appear like twin smiley faces. Fabrics like linen and cotton in loosely-fit styles will both increase airflow and help hide boob sweat.

5. Use Moroccan Argan Oil

Moroccan argan oil has been a beauty secret for centuries. It’s especially effective for treating skin infections caused by bacteria and contains more antioxidant properties than coconut oil. Many women swear that argan works wonders for boob sweat, minimizing both the initial sweating and the resulting irritation.

Try applying a few drops of oil underneath your breasts. If you suffer from irritation or itchiness related to boob sweat, Moroccan argan can help calm down your skin. Some women report that sweating, odor, and discomfort completely disappear after a few days of applying Moroccan argan oil. It also has the added bonus of being a natural product.

6. Try Sweat Pads or Liners

Bra liners are just what they sound like – small pieces of fabric that you can wear under boobs to create a sweat-absorbing barrier. These liners are good options for those with sensitive skin or who otherwise don’t want to apply products like powders or creams to the breast area. Some women even report using panty liners to help soak up the sweat that pools in the bottom of their bras. The pads also absorb moisture and protect your clothing from sweat stains – just pop them at the base of your bra cups and enjoy their sweat-absorbing mojo. Just make sure you choose an option that’s 100 percent cotton.

If you’d like something a bit more sophisticated, you can also invest in a specially-designed bra liner, which can prevent irritation by pulling dampness away from your skin. Many popular versions are made with cotton or even bamboo. You can also use nursing pads as boob sweat pads– they’re designed to fit inside a bra cup, so they’re already the right size and absorbency.

7. Swipe on an Antiperspirant

It sounds weird, but you can use some antiperspirants under your boobs to prevent sweat. Many dermatologists recommend a cream or soft solid. Be careful to choose something that won’t leave white marks on your cleavage. Some women report success by swiping a little below their boobs when they apply it to their underarm areas – after all, antiperspirants are meant to stop sweat wherever it may be on your body. Check with a medical professional before applying stronger clinical or prescription strength antiperspirants the the chest/breast area.

8. Carry Body Wipes

Body wipes are fantastic for quick freshen-ups. Carry them in your bag, and then you have them available anytime your girls start sweating. You’ll head off odors, clean your skin and feel generally fresher. Body wipes are gentle on your skin and not overly perfumed – you can get mildly fragranced versions for a touch of boob deodorant or opt for completely fragrance-free.

9. Use an Anti-Chafing Powder

Friction is your enemy when it comes to boob sweat. When your breasts rub against your chest, it can result in chafing and even nipple pain. This boob-rub friction also creates heat, which kicks the sweat into overdrive. Baby powder is a popular choice for absorbing sweat, reducing odor and guarding against both rashes and chafing. One downside to baby powder is that it’s usually absorbed pretty quickly. While it may be effective for night time or when you’re hanging out at home, sometimes baby powder struggles to keep up with your boob sweat demands during the whole day. Powders with corn starch can be a highly effective option, so look for products that use corn starch as their main ingredient (as opposed to baby powder, which is talc-based).

10. Anti-Chafing Lotion, Gels and Creams

If you don’t love the messy application of anti-chafing body powder, there are lotions and creams that can also prevent chafing and help reduce moisture and odor. An anti-chafing lotion is less messy than talcum or body powder and can be carried in your purse throughout the day for quick touch-ups as needed. Don’t apply too much– if you do, it can leave a residue.

Keep in mind that your cleavage isn’t the only area of the body that can suffer from chafing. For more helpful tips, be sure to read out our article on preventing thigh chafing.

Boob Sweat: The Struggle is Real

The struggle is real with boob sweat. When it happens, it can be uncomfortable, annoying and potentially super embarrassing. Not only does it soak your shirt with ugly sweat stains, but it can also cause a whole host of other problems, ranging from chafing to underboob rash and other skin irritations.

It goes without saying, but it’s important to practice good hygiene by showering every day and drying yourself completely with a clean towel. You can even use the cool setting on your blow dryer to completely dry any dampness under boobs after your shower.

But when you need additional help battling boob sweat, don’t lose heart! If you follow these recommendations for preventing boob sweat and chafing, you’ll be on your way to a dryer and worry-free experience– even in the summertime.

If you suffer from hyperhidrosis (also known as excessive sweating), you’ve likely heard of Iontophoresis. This unique hyperhidrosis treatment can be very effective in reducing the symptoms of hyperhidrosis.

We won’t lie, iontophoresis is a bit odd. For this reason, we’ve made a list of the most common questions about iontophoresis. Hopefully the answers will help you in your quest to stop unwanted sweat.

Iontophoresis

Iontophoresis: Frequently Asked Questions

  • 1. What is iontophoresis? Who invented it and when?
  • 2. How does iontophoresis therapy work?
  • 3. Does iontophoresis work for hyperhidrosis?
  • 4. How often should I have treatments?
  • 5. When will iontophoresis start working?
  • 6. What areas of the body can be treated with iontophoresis?
  • 7. Can iontophoresis work on my underarms?
  • 8. What is an iontophoresis patch and how does it work?
  • 9. Does iontophoresis hurt?
  • 10. Can I be electrically shocked by iontophoresis?
  • 11. Is the iontophoresis treatment permanent?
  • 12. Are there side effects from iontophoresis?
  • 13. Who performs iontophoresis?
  • 14. Will my insurance pay for iontophoresis?
  • 15. How much do iontophoresis treatments cost?
  • 16. What is the best iontophoresis machine for me?
  • 17. How much will an iontophoresis machine cost and where can I buy one?
  • 18. What if I’m pregnant? (and other iontophoresis contraindications)
  • 19. What other hyperhidrosis treatments can I try?

1. What is iontophoresis? Who invented it and when?

Iontophoresis is a medical procedure which uses a mild electrical current to gently push medications through the skin while the treated body area is submerged in water. You might think of it as an injection without a needle.

The procedure is most often used to treat hyperhidrosis or uncontrolled, profuse sweating. It can also be used to treat injuries related to sports by delivering anti-inflammatory medicines directly through the skin.

The idea of using weak electrical energy to deliver medicine dates back to the mid-18th century. Significant progress was made by several researchers in the 19th century and the concept gained serious traction soon after.

In the early 1900’s, Dr. Stéphan Leducafter, a French physician, published a series of scientific papers on the subject. Other contributors to the science were Benjamin Ward Richardson, Hermann Munk, William James Morton, and Fritz Frankenhäuser.

Recently, researchers have given iontophoresis a fancy new name: “electrically-assisted transdermal drug delivery.” This is what too many years of education can do. 😉

2. How does iontophoresis therapy work?

Iontophoresis works on the principle of ions. In this instance, the ions are water-soluble substances that carry either a positive or negative charge. Like the poles of a magnet, the positive electrode repels and the negative electrode attracts.

By running a mild galvanic (direct) current through a shallow container of water, an ion can be pushed into the skin if the active electrode has the same charge as the target ion.

The principle is the same as when two positive ends of a magnet push away from each other when they are placed together.

Because the skin is an excellent barrier and protects the body from outside intrusion, iontophoresis has limited value in delivering medications directly into the skin.

Generally speaking, a patient receiving iontophoresis treatment for hyperhidrosis sits with one or both hands or feet immersed in a shallow pan or tray filled with tap water.

Normally anticholinergic medicines are placed in the water that block the transmission of nerve signals to the sweat glands. By stimulating the iontophoresis electrodes, the electrical current “pushes” the medication into the skin. Treatments can last from 15 to 40 minutes.

3. Does iontophoresis work for hyperhidrosis?

The short answer is yes. While iontophoresis has limited usefulness in treating other conditions, it can be effective in treating certain types of primary or focal hyperhidrosis.

The procedure is routinely used for the treatment of palmar hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating of the hands) and plantar hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating of the feet).

4. How often should I have treatments?

Always consult with your doctor before beginning a regimen of iontophoresis treatments. Usually, the process is repeated 3 times a week in the beginning, and until sweating is reduced to the desired degree. Then patients are switched to a schedule of one treatment each week.

To maintain effectiveness, treatments must be consistent and performed regularly before your sweating begins to return.

5. When will iontophoresis start working?

Patience is a virtue. That may not be a comforting thought as you deal with excessive, unrelenting sweating, but it’s important to keep in mind. How long it takes to see results varies significantly from person to person.

Some patients report positive results in the first day of treatment. For others, it may require three to four weeks of consistent treatment before the sweating is significantly reduced.

Most patients see a discernable difference by the end of the first week. If it’s going to work for you, that’s the benchmark to keep in mind. Long-term improvement is usually achieved after a few weeks of regular treatments.

6. What areas of the body can be treated with iontophoresis?

Iontophoresis has been used to treat hyperhidrosis since the 1940’s. Most medical studies have focused on the procedure for hyperhidrosis of the feet (plantar) and the hands (palmar). Fewer studies have examined hyperhidrosis of the armpits (axillary).

In one year-long study of 27 patients with palmoplantar hyperhidrosis (affecting the hands and feet), there was a “good” response. Desired improvement took from 2 to 4 weeks.

In every successful case, ongoing treatment was necessary to maintain dryness. When used correctly, iontophoresis can have a positive effect on 85% to 90% of hyperhidrosis patients.

7. Can iontophoresis work on my underarms?

The evidence collected so far shows that iontophoresis of the underarms might be an effective option for some people. The International Hyperhidrosis Society notes that iontophoresis is generally less effective than other methods for managing underarm sweating.

A clinical strength antiperspirant may be more effective in treating excessive underarm sweating.

8. What is an iontophoresis patch and how does it work?

An iontophoresis patch is an electrodynamic patch made from fabric material mingled with photovoltaic cells. Micro-currents are created by the transdermal patch when it comes in contact with the skin.

These currents use the iontophoresis principle to suppress the sweat glands from secreting sweat. Iontophoretic patches can be used on hands and feet, but are especially suited for underarm iontophoresis treatments.

A pouch containing a dosage of medication can be attached to an iontophoresis patch which delivers the medication directly through the skin.

Iontophoresis dexamethasone is a cortisone-like medication that is often used in conjunction with this treatment. It can provide relief from inflammation and helps prevent unwanted side effects.

Sometimes a Diclofenac gel is applied topically to reduce the inflammation.

The ActivaPatch is a self-contained single-use drug delivery patch that contains an electrical source (a battery), electrode and chamber into which desired medicines can be placed.

Once adhered to the skin in the desired location, it can provide up to 2.5 hours of iontophoresis treatment.

9. Does iontophoresis hurt?

No, iontophoresis treatments are not known to cause pain. But at the same time, it’s not what you would call “pleasant” either. When performed correctly, the treatment is rarely painful, though many patients report feeling mildly uncomfortable.

You will likely experience a tingling sensation during the process. Be sure you don’t have any open sores or wounds in the area to be treated.

The sensation will be much stronger if the current passes through open skin. You can cover any open skin with petroleum jelly to protect it.

10. Can I be electrically shocked by iontophoresis?

You can’t be seriously electrically shocked, but you may feel surprised by the tingling. The voltage of the electrical current used in iontophoresis is low and not strong enough to cause a harmful shock.

But if it’s not done correctly, or if you remove your hands or feet from the water during treatment– or if equipment malfunctions– the sensation might be a trifle unexpected.

You may temporarily experience minor heel pain during an improper foot treatment, for example. Be sure to remove any metal jewelry beforehand.

As the electrical current is increased, any unpleasant sensation will increase. But you’ll be in control and you’ll be able to decrease the current if the treatment becomes too uncomfortable.

It’s a good idea to have another person present during treatments. If you’re using an iontophoresis machine at home, be sure to completely read the manufacturer’s user guide and follow all suggested instructions and precautions.

11. Is the iontophoresis treatment permanent?

No, iontophoresis for hyperhidrosis is not a permanent solution. After the initial treatment period when the desired level of sweat reduction is achieved, maintenance treatments must be continued indefinitely (usually once a week).

It is important not to wait until the excessive sweating returns. Permanent hyperhidrosis treatments require more invasive treatments or surgical options.

12. Are there side effects from iontophoresis?

While iontophoresis is a safe and relatively pain-free treatment, some patients may experience some minor adverse effects. The good news is that any side effects are easily alleviated and generally not serious. The most common side effect is itching and drying of the skin.

Apply a moisturizing cream or lotion after each treatment to hydrate and soothe dry skin. Other possible side effects include blistering, skin irritation and peeling.

13. Who performs iontophoresis?

Many primary care or family practice doctors can administer the iontophoresis treatments. Some neurologists, internists, and surgeons will also offer the treatment. Seeking out a dermatologist will probably be your best bet.

After initial treatments performed by a qualified physician, it is not uncommon for patients to continue treatments at home with equipment that can be purchased for personal use.

14. Will my insurance pay for iontophoresis?

That depends on your insurance carrier. Sadly, iontophoresis for hyperhidrosis is a treatment that some insurance carriers consider unproven or investigational.

If that’s the case for you, you’ll have to pay out-of-pocket. Some physicians will allow you to negotiate the cost of treatment if your insurance will not cover it.

15. How much do iontophoresis treatments cost?

Iontophoresis treatments in a doctor’s office will set you back about $150 to $200 per session. Costs can vary significantly depending on the selected practitioner and location. It’s going to cost you more in Los Angeles than in Fargo, North Dakota.

If you decide to administer the treatments yourself after your initial doctor visits, you can purchase your own equipment. When you consider the cost of several treatments at the doctor’s office, this investment can be a cost-saving alternative.

16. What is the best iontophoresis machine for me?

The best machine for your specific condition depends on a lot of variables. Be aware that the manufacturer of any iontophoresis device is going to claim that their machine is the best. Here are important factors to consider when looking to purchase an iontophoresis machine for home use:

  • Affordability – Find a device that works within your budget. You’ll find many that will work.
  • Machine size – If the machine will be used at home, size may not be an issue. If you travel a lot, you’ll want something you can pack and take with you.
  • Safety – Find a machine that has safety features that eliminate the possibility of electrical shock.
  • Timers – The duration of treatments is critical to potential success. An onboard timer will be helpful in making sure treatments aren’t too short or too long.
  • Power source – Some machines are battery powered only. Replacing those batteries can be expensive.
  • Warranty and Service – Choose a machine that includes a warranty (at least 12 months) and be sure the manufacturer offers a user-friendly customer service program.

17. How much will an iontophoresis machine cost and where can I buy one?

A quality iontophoresis machine with basic features should cost somewhere between $500 – $700. If your budget won’t allow for an investment of several hundred dollars, there are low-cost machines available online starting at about $100.

Be cautious of low-priced machines, as safety features and build quality may have not been high on the maker’s priority list. Do your research. There are many choices available online, and they can also be purchased from local medical supply brick-and-mortar stores.

Also, if you’re handy, it’s fairly simple and easy to build one of your own.

18. What if I’m pregnant? (and other iontophoresis contraindications)

Always consult a doctor before commencing iontophoresis treatments. There are several conditions and situations for which either extra caution or total avoidance of the treatment are necessary.

  • If you wear a pacemaker – The electrical current used in iontophoresis, although mild, may interfere with a pacemaker.
  • Pregnancy – Iontophoresis has not been tested on pregnant women. If you’re pregnant, iontophoresis treatments are not recommended.
  • Metal orthopedic implants – Because electrical current will pass through the parts of the body being treated, any metal implants in those areas can cause problems. Talk to your physician about the treatment if you have any metal implants in your body.
  • Cardiac arrhythmia – Electrical impulses trigger your heart to beat. If you have an irregular heart condition, you should avoid iontophoresis unless your doctor specifically recommends it and supervises the treatment.
  • Skin rash or disease – Iontophoresis therapy should be avoided if a skin rash or skin disease is present in the affected areas.

19. What other hyperhidrosis treatments can I try?

Iontophoresis is considered a tier 3 treatment. That means there are other treatments for hyperhidrosis that are recommended before resorting to the use of an iontophoresis machine.

One of the most effective treatments for hyperhidrosis is a clinical strength antiperspirant like SweatBlock. It is highly effective for controlling underarm sweating, as well as hand, feet, and head sweating.

Clinical strength antiperspirants are not expensive, and they’re easy to use, and they’re readily available online and in local drugstores.

There are other hyperhidrosis treatments that may be worth considering. Many are more expensive and more invasive than iontophoresis. These include Botox injections, and using electromagnetic or microwave energy for killing sweat glands.

Irreversible surgery is also an option. Once again, talking with a doctor about your specific situation is the best course of action. He or she can prescribe the treatment that best suits you.

The Bottom Line

Iontophoresis is a widely accepted and proven treatment for sufferers of hyperhidrosis. Whether it’s a good treatment for you will depend on the seriousness of your sweating condition and other symptom relief treatments you may have already tried.

Now that you have a better understanding of iontophoresis, you’ll be able to make an informed decision about how best to treat your hyperhidrosis. You do have options, and the good news is that there’s a treatment that will likely work well for you. Don’t give up… life can be good again!

Are you sweating profusely for no apparent reason? Is it the kind of sweating that can’t be explained by exercise or external temperature– or even unusual stress?

The cause of your excessive sweating may be diaphoresis.

In this article we’ll explore the following topics surrounding diaphoresis…

  • What is Diaphoresis?
  • What Causes Diaphoresis?
  • What Medications Can Cause Diaphoresis?
  • How is Diaphoresis Different than Hyperhidrosis?
  • When Should I Get Medical Help or Talk to My Doctor?
  • What are the Treatment Options for Diaphoresis?

Why do we sweat? Sweating is the natural way the body manages and regulates its temperature. When functioning normally, your body perspires when you’re engaged in exertion or physical exercise, exposed to external heat, and even when you’re feeling unusual mental or emotional stress.

When you perspire, your brain signals the millions of sweat glands located all over your body (except ear canals, lips, and genitals) to secret moisture composed mostly of water and electrolytes. Once this sweat reaches the surface of the skin, it evaporates. The evaporation of your sweat dissipates heat which in turn cools the body.

If unusual and excessive sweating occurs for no apparent reason, then something else is going on. It may be primary hyperhidrosis (more about that later) or diaphoresis. It’s important to understand the difference to know exactly what’s happening with your body.

Diaphoresis

What is Diaphoresis?

Diaphoresis is excessive sweating caused by one or more secondary (meaning separate and not related) medical conditions. It can also be a side effect of certain medications. Diaphoresis is not a problem of a malfunctioning nervous system or overactive sweat glands, and treating it successfully usually requires medical attention to discover the specific cause.

Diaphoresis is also known as secondary hyperhidrosis because it is a symptom of a secondary disorder. Once the cause is identified and properly treated, the excessive sweating stops.

What Causes Diaphoresis?

There are dozens of diseases and medical conditions that can cause diaphoresis. Some of the most common causes are:

Menopause

A majority of women (85% or more) experience periods of increased sweating, night sweats, and hot flashes during menopause. As a woman transitions from fertility to infertility, fluctuating hormones send false signals to the brain that the body is overheating. This results in excessive perspiration and night sweats. Once the menopausal change progresses, the bouts of profuse sweating and night sweats usually cease. Some women find relief through hormone therapy for a short time.

Obesity

Obesity can cause diaphoresis in both men and women. Defined as having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or higher, obesity is very common in the United States and affects one-third of all adults. Losing sufficient weight almost always causes the excessive sweating to stop.

Diabetes

For people with diabetes, sweating profusely is an early symptom of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Critically low blood sugar is a result of either too much insulin or too little sugar. This causes the body to lapse into a fight-or-flight state, releasing hormones that increase sweating. Proper management of diabetes significantly reduces the occurrence of diaphoresis.

Parkinson’s Disease

Coping with Parkinson’s disease is very difficult, but when you add excessive sweating to the equation it becomes even worse. Parkinson’s disease affects the autonomic nervous system, causing the body to lose its ability to properly regulate many body functions. Changes in the sweat glands often occur and can cause Parkinson’s sufferers to sweat uncontrollably.

Pregnancy

Increased hormone levels (some may say raging hormones) in a woman’s body during pregnancy can cause heavy perspiration. As a pregnant woman’s metabolism speeds up, her body temperature rises, which can cause abnormal sweating. The extra weight gained during pregnancy may also increase the likelihood of diaphoresis. Fortunately, it’s only a 9-month-long condition, then the sweat glands return to normal.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that affects the body’s joints, causing swelling, pain, and stiffness. A common symptom of this disorder is excessive sweating.

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism is a medical condition in which the thyroid gland shifts into hyperactivity, producing too much of the hormone thyroxine. The overabundance of thyroxine speeds up the body’s metabolism and causes heavy sweating (among a number of other symptoms).

Heart Attack

A heart attack, aka myocardial infarction, happens when a portion of your heart muscle becomes damaged or dies. Symptoms include heavy sweating, faintness, chest pain, pain in one or both arms, shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, and a pale or ashen colored face.

Cancer

Diaphoresis is linked to several types of cancer. Among them are lymphoma, leukemia, bone cancer, liver cancer, testicular cancer, as well as carcinoid tumors.

Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis is an intense and acute allergic reaction. One of the first signs of an anaphylaxis reaction is an instant onset of heavy and profuse sweating. Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening reaction that requires immediate attention and treatment.

Alcohol and Drug Withdrawal

Profuse sweating often occurs when those addicted to alcohol or drugs go through withdrawal. Going “cold turkey” not only leads to excessive sweating but also includes other reactions that can be temporarily life-threatening.

Gout

Diaphoresis (secondary hyperhidrosis) can also be caused by gout. Gout is a common form of arthritis that develops from high levels of uric acid in the blood. It can strike anyone. In addition to excessive sweating, other symptoms of gout include sudden swelling and joint pain, usually in the big toe.

What Medications Can Cause Diaphoresis?

There are hundreds of medicines that have been known to cause excessive sweating. The most common medicines that can cause diaphoresis include:

Antidepressants

All varieties and classes of antidepressants may cause diaphoresis. Antidepressants increase serotonin levels in the brain. Serotonin affects the hypothalamus, which is the part of the brain that regulates the body’s core temperature.

Migraine Medication

Medicine for migraines can cause excessive sweating if they contain triptan– such as sumatriptan, rizatriptan, frovatriptan and eletriptan. These substances also increase serotonin levels.

Pain Relievers

Aspirin or ibuprofen are known to cause excessive sweating. The over-the-counter pain medicines reduce a fever by dilating blood vessels, causing heat to be dissipated through the skin. Opioids may also cause heavy sweating.

Diabetes Medication

Insulin, glyburide, glipizide, pioglitazone, and other diabetes medication are known to cause diaphoresis. Heavy sweating can occur as the body adjusts to altered blood sugar levels.

Asthma Inhalers

Certain asthma inhalers which contain beta-agonist drugs may trigger excessive sweating. Albuterol and levalbuterol directly stimulate sweat glands to produce more sweat.

Heartburn Medication

Heartburn and reflux medicines like Prilosec and Prevacid are known to cause sweating as a side effect.

Sildenafil (Viagra)

Viagra, known as sildenafil in its generic form, may also cause diaphoresis. The drug dilates blood vessels to heighten blood flow, which can cause flushing and spontaneous sweating.

Ropinirole

Also known as Requip, this medication is commonly prescribed to treat restless leg syndrome and Parkinson’s disease. It activates dopamine receptors which can lead to profuse sweating.

Breast Cancer Medication

Excessive sweating can be a side effect of certain breast cancer medications, such as anastrozole, exemestane, letrozole, and tamoxifen. These drugs are anti-estrogen compounds designed to prevent breast cancer from recurring.

Leuprolide

Luprolide, known commercially as the brand name Lupron, is a drug prescribed to treat endometriosis and prostate cancer. It lowers hormone levels in both men and women and can lead to heavy sweating and night sweats.

How is Diaphoresis Different than Hyperhidrosis?

There are two types of hyperhidrosis– primary hyperhidrosis (also called focal hyperhidrosis) and secondary hyperhidrosis (sometimes called generalized hyperhidrosis).

Diaphoresis and secondary hyperhidrosis are synonymous they are different medical terms for the same condition. But diaphoresis is different from primary (focal) hyperhidrosis. Let’s explore how diaphoresis is like secondary hyperhidrosis but different from primary hyperhidrosis.

Primary or focal hyperhidrosis is a serious medical disorder that is characterized by excessive, uncontrollable sweating not related to heat or exercise. Recent research indicates that it affects about 5% or the world’s population. It can be focused on the underarms (axillary hyperhidrosis), the hands or palms (palmar hyperhidrosis), the feet (plantar hyperhidrosis) or the head and face (craniofacial hyperhidrosis).

What causes primary hyperhidrosis is unknown, but it is thought to be hereditary. The nervous system triggers localized sweat glands, known as eccrine glands, into hyperactivity for no apparent reason and without external stimuli such as elevated body temperature and exertion. This extreme perspiration can negatively affect the physical, emotional, mental and social aspects of life. There is no cure. However, there are numerous effective treatments that can reduce or eliminate the excessive sweating due to primary hyperhidrosis.

The cause of secondary hyperhidrosis, or diaphoresis, is something else entirely. While the symptoms of diaphoresis and primary hyperhidrosis are identical– profuse, uncontrollable sweating– diaphoresis is caused by a secondary or underlying cause not related to over-active sweat glands. The possible causes include the disorders and medications identified above as well as dozens of other less common ones. Unlike primary hyperhidrosis, once the underlying disorder is successfully treated, the excessive sweating usually stops.

When Should I Get Medical Help or Talk to My Doctor?

It’s normal to sweat when you work out, become hot, or find yourself in a nervous or anxious situation such as a job interview, important presentation, or on a first date. Nervous sweating is also normal, though darn inconvenient at times. But you should become concerned if you find yourself frequently soaking through your shirts or socks, or trying to hide your perpetually wet, clammy hands. Yes, it’s embarrassing, but thankfully your excessive sweating can be treated. Don’t suffer in silence out of shyness or shame. Start by seeing your primary care doctor. He or she can refer you to a specialist if necessary.

What are the Treatment Options for Diaphoresis?

The best and most effective treatment of diaphoresis is to treat the underlying disease or disorder that is triggering the profuse sweating.

In the meantime, here are some remedies that may help reduce your excessive sweating. When it comes to some of these natural and home remedies, your mileage may vary. The International Hyperhidrosis Society has concluded there is “little research to recommend such natural remedies, but this does not discount their potential.”

Natural Remedies for Treating Diaphoresis

Camphor

Camphor was once made by distilling wood from the camphor tree. Today it is synthesized chemically. It’s used in such products as Vicks VapoRub. Dissolve a small portion of camphor or some camphor oil in some fractionated coconut oil. Apply the mixture to affected areas and leave it on the skin for 40 to 60 minutes. Then wash the area gently with cool, clean water. Camphor can also be added to bath water to help reduce sweating.

Vinegar

When applied directly to your skin, vinegar acts as an astringent that eliminates many bacteria and will also close up pores. Use a cotton ball to dab a little apple cider vinegar on the desired areas overnight. Simply wash it off when you shower or bathe in the morning.

Tomato Juice

A glass of tomato juice or a tomato-rich diet can help control profuse sweating by regulating your internal body temperature.

Green and Black Tea

Green tea contains magnesium and vitamin B. These act as astringents and constrict sweat glands. A cup of green tea in the morning may help reduce sweating. Black tea is also an astringent. Brew one or two black tea bags, allowing the tea to steep for 10 minutes. Apply the tea directly to your underarms with a clean washcloth.

Essential Oils

Those who prefer natural remedies often recommend essential oils as a remedy for excessive sweating. If you want to try essential oils, you should thoroughly study the potential benefits and hazards of each beforehand.

Here are 3 of the most popular essential oils for controlling sweat:

  • Sage oil has long been used to ease the symptoms of menopause.
  • Cistus oil is an astringent that can shrink pores.
  • Clary Sage oil contains linalyl acetate which has calming properties.

Other Effective Remedies

There are several effective remedies for primary hyperhidrosis. However, because of their permanence, expense, or invasiveness, they likely wouldn’t be appropriate for treating diaphoresis. It’s important to remember that curing diaphoresis means identifying and successfully treating the underlying, unrelated disease or disorder that triggers the excessive sweating.

Short of overcoming the disorder that’s responsible for diaphoresis, here are two remedies that can treat the profuse sweating without permanently altering, removing or destroying sweat glands:

Clinical-Strength or Prescription-Strength Antiperspirants

These powerful antiperspirant products, like SweatBlock, are different than the antiperspirants you find on the shelves of your local grocery or drug store. They contain higher concentrations of the aluminum chloride, a compound that temporarily blocks the sweat glands from secreting sweat. When aluminum chloride comes in contact with water (your sweat), it forms a gel-like plug that blocks sweat from reaching the surface of the skin. A single application of a prescription strength antiperspirant may last up to a week before it must be reapplied.

Botox Injections

Botox is a natural, purified protein that can temporarily impede the chemical that “turns on” the body’s sweat glands. It blocks the nerves that cause sweating. Botox injections are shallow and the medicine is injected just below the surface of the skin. The desired effects will last 6 to 12 months before the treatment must be repeated. While effective, this treatment is very expensive and can be painful.

A Final Note

Diaphoresis, by definition, is always caused by another illness or medication. The best treatment is always to identify and appropriately treat the underlying condition. Once that happens, the excessive sweating almost always stops. If treatment for the secondary cause is not possible or requires a prolonged period to take effect, there are treatments and remedies that can help in the meantime. Talk to your doctor about your symptoms and available treatment options.

When sweating reaches epic proportions, you need something more than pedestrian store-shelf antiperspirants. You need a heavy weight contender – a prescription, or prescription “strength” antiperspirant. Here’s your guide to prescription-only and clinical strength antiperspirants.

prescription antiperspirant

What is prescription antiperspirant?

As the name implies, prescription antiperspirants require a prescription and a doctor’s supervision. They cannot be purchased anywhere but a pharmacy. The concentration of active aluminum ingredient in these products is generally around 20%. Prescription options are not to be taken lightly. Misuse of prescription antiperspirants can lead to serious unwanted side effects. (we’ll talk about this later)

How does prescription antiperspirant work?

All antiperspirants, regardless of brand name or strength level, use aluminum salt as the active ingredient. The most common aluminum salt compounds found in today’s antiperspirants are aluminum chloride, aluminum chlorohydrate, aluminum chloride hexaydrate and aluminum zirconium tricholorhydrex glycine.

While the effectiveness of these varies, each of these aluminum compounds works to reduce sweating in the same basic way. When they get close to water, in this case perspiration, they soak up the moisture and thicken into a gel-like substance. By spreading aluminum chloride, or one of its cousins, on areas that sweat, the resulting reaction forms a gel-like plug that blocks the sweat glands and prevents sweat from reaching the skin’s surface. Once this happens the body’s feedback mechanism stops the flow of perspiration.

The plugs dissipate over time and the sweat glands begin to function as before. That’s when the antiperspirant must be reapplied. Depending on the strength of the antiperspirant, the reapplication time may range from several hours to several days.

Prescription Antiperspirant vs. Prescription “Strength” Antiperspirant. Is there a difference?

It’s not uncommon for people to confuse the two. But they are different.

Prescription strength simply means really strong. A prescription strength antiperspirant will have more Aluminum salts or use a more potent form of Aluminum. For example, Aluminum Chloride is a lot stronger than Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex (Used in antiperspirants like Dove, Old Spice and Degree.)

Most clinical and prescription strength products will use Aluminum Chloride (usually around 12%-15%)

Prescription Strength and Clinical Strength are often used interchangeably, but they’re pretty much the same thing.

Prescription-only antiperspirants are even stronger, require a prescription, and can only be purchased at a pharmacy. They usually contain a higher concentration of Aluminum Chloride (20% or more) and can be more effective in extreme sweating cases. Last of all, a prescription option will most likely carry with it additional health risks and side effects. (more on this below…)

Prescription Antiperspirant Options:

Some of the more common prescription antiperspirant brands include:

  • Drysol is a popular prescription antiperspirant designed to treat hyperhidrosis and excessive sweating. Can be used on the underarms, scalp, hands, and feet. Active Ingredient: Aluminum chloride hexahydrate (20%)
  • Xerac AC is a topical, prescription-only treatment designed for use on the underarms, palms and feet.
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate (6.25%)
  • Formalaz is a sweating treatment specifically designed to combat foot odor and sweat. A prescription-only option for plantar hyperhidrosis or foot sweating. Active ingredient: Formaldehyde (10%)

Prescription antiperspirant is strong stuff and should only be considered after exhausting all other over-the-counter hyperhidrosis and excessive sweating treatments.

Best Prescription Strength Antiperspirants:

Try some of these popular prescription strength and clinical strength antiperspirants before resorting to prescription-only. Many of these products can be purchased online via Amazon or at your local drug store.

  • SweatBlock Clinical Strength Antiperspirant
    The original 7-day antiperspirant wipe. Formulated to reduce excessive sweating and axillary hyperhidrosis. According to users, SweatBlock keeps a person dry for an average of 6.4 days and often works when nothing else will.
    Effective for: Excessive sweating and hyperhidrosis
    Application: Sweat Wipe (Antiperspirant Wipe)
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum Chloride (14%)
  • Driclor
    This another over-the-counter prescription strength option. It’s made in Australia and can be used for treating excessive sweating of the hands, feet and armpits. If you’re worried about sweat stains in your shirt, you’ll want to avoid this one.
    Effective for: Hands, Feet, and Armpit Sweatin
    Application: Roll-on
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum hexahydrate (20%)
  • Certain Dri Prescription Strength
    The strongest antiperspirant in the Certain Dri family. Designed for underarm use and can last up to 72 hours per application.
    Effective for: Underarm Sweating / Axillary Hyperhidrosis
    Application: Roll-on
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum Chloride (12%)
  • Odaban Antiperspirant Spray
    Offers 24-hour protection and may be the strongest non prescription antiperspirant available. It contains high concentrations of aluminum chloride which can increase effectiveness. But with increased effectiveness comes increased chance for skin irritation and burning.
    Effective for: Armpits, Hands, Feet
    Application: Spray
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum chloride (20%)
  • Maxim Prescription Strength Antiperspirant
    Over the counter hyperhidrosis treatment designed for underarm use.
    Effective for: Underarm Sweating / Axillary Hyperhidrosis
    Application: Roll-on
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum Chloride (15%)

If none of the above options work for you, it’s time to look at a prescription only product.

Should I Use a Prescription Strength Antiperspirant?

Choosing a prescription antiperspirant isn’t the same as picking out a pair of shoes or doing price comparisons on vacuum cleaners.

This is a personal question and you and your doctor are the only ones qualified to tackle it. But here’s a few things to consider as you venture down the path of prescription hyperhidrosis treatments.

How severe is your sweating? You wouldn’t be here reading this fascinating article if sweat wasn’t somewhat excessive. But how bad is it? If it’s an occasional inconvenience, you probably don’t need prescription strength. If profuse sweating has transformed you into a cave-dwelling hermit who avoids all social interaction, you’re barking up the right tree.

Which sweating treatments have you already tried? Again, if you’re reading this, you’ve probably tried A LOT. But if you’ve only experimented with Old Spice and Degree, you still have a lot of non prescription options on the table. It’s best to exhaust all over-the-counter antiperspirant options before reaching for a prescription solution.

Have you talked to your doctor? Your doctor will be able to help you more than any blog post or article. If you’ve tried everything and nothing seems relieve your excessive sweating, talk to your doctor about available prescription anti-perspirants.

Ultimately, your doctor will know which antiperspirant options are safe and can guide you through the process of finding one that works best for your body chemistry and severity of sweating.

Prescription Antiperspirant Risks & Side Effects:

The best part about prescription anti-perspirants is that they’re super strong. The worst part… they come with side effects and potential health risks like:

  • Allergic reactions like hives, rash, itching, chest tightness, swelling of the face, lips, tongue or throat.
  • Severe burning, itching, redness or swelling of treated areas.

These precautions should be observed when using Prescription antiperspirants:

  • Always consult a doctor before using any Prescription antiperspirant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are using Antabuse (disulfiram) before using.
  • Do not use any other deodorant or antiperspirant (unless your doctor says otherwise)
  • Avoid getting Prescription antiperspirant in your eyes, nose, mouth or on your lips.
  • Do not use any antiperspirant on irritated or broken skin.
  • Wait at least 24 to 48 hours when applying to shaved areas.
  • Prescription antiperspirants may stain clothing and metal surfaces.
  • It is not known if the use of Drysol and other Prescription antiperspirants may harm an unborn baby.

Alternative Treatments to Prescription Antiperspirant:

It might be worth exploring outside the realm of prescription antiperspirant. Hyperhidrosis has been around for a long time and many treatments have been developed over the years. Their effectiveness varies, but some have proven very efficient at stopping embarrassing sweat. Here’s a few of them…

  • Clinical Strength Antiperspirants. Over-the-counter clinical antiperspirants are stronger than your average Dove or Speedstick, but don’t require a doctor and don’t come with as many side effects or potential health risks. We like this one (wink… wink)
  • Qbrexza Wipe. A prescription-only treatment for axillary hyperhdirosis. This medicated cloth is designed for underarm topical use. It contains a nerve blocking solution that stops underarm sweat in its tracks. It can be extremely effective, but comes with a long list of unwanted side effects.
  • Iontophoresis is a treatment that uses electric currents in water to drive medications into the skin. Can be very effective, yet very expensive.
  • Botox injections in affected areas can curtail sweating for months before they must be repeated. Effective, but painful and not permanent.
  • Miradry is a procedure that uses microwaves to nuke your sweat glands. No more sweat glands leads to no more sweat.

So, you think you sweat more than normal? A lot of people worry about whether they perspire a “normal” amount. We get it.

Excessive sweat is embarrassing and can throw a wrench into any social situation. Sweating is good and certainly has its benefits (like preventing heat stroke). But it also comes with a host of humiliating side effects (sweaty pits, sweaty handshakes, sweaty feet, sweaty face, etc…)

Wondering why you might be sweating more than normal? You’re in luck, we’ve compiled a list of the most common sweat triggers and how to avoid them.

8 Things That Can Trigger Unwanted Sweat:

  • 1. Stress
  • 2. Crazy Hormones
  • 3. Your Choice of Food
  • 4. Not Eating Enough Food
  • 5. Your Mood (Excited, Happy, Scared)
  • 6. Social Anxiety
  • 7. Being Physically Fit or Overweight
  • 8. Medications

A lot of different things can cause excessive sweating. But there’s always a reason. Sure, you might have a medical condition, such as primary hyperhidrosis, a sweating disorder that makes you perspire more than the average person. But that’s not as likely as you might think. Hyperhidrosis affects less than 5% of the population. There’s a good chance you just have a random sweat trigger you didn’t know about.

1. You’re Really Stressed Out

What do you do if you randomly start sweating for no apparent reason? Freak out? Yeah, a lot of people do. Well, did you know that freaking out about sweating is probably just making you sweat more?

That’s right. Stress is a HUGE sweat trigger.

If you notice that you’re sweating at a random time, quickly do a mental stress check.

  • Is something upsetting you?
  • Have you been brooding about something for most of the day?
  • Are you worried about something?

If you answered, “yes” to any of these questions, your stress may be to blame for your random bout of nervous sweating.

2. Your Hormones Are In Overdrive

Pregnancy and menopause can really mess with a woman’s hormones. In fact, this hormonal rioting can cause mood swings, odd cravings and … overactive sweat glands.

Have you ever heard a pregnant woman complain about night sweats or hot flashes? Yeah, those mini sweat sessions happen because your hormones are out of whack.

Unfortunately, there’s not a lot you can do to prevent this kind of hormonal sweating (aside from delivering your baby or magically skipping menopause).

Fortunately, both pregnancy and menopause are temporary life phases. When they leave, your hormones will chill out and sweating can return to normal.

Pregnancy and menopause aren’t the only things that screw with your hormones. Puberty and overactive thyroid issues can also lead to belligerent hormones and excessive sweating — especially underarm sweating.

3. You’re Eating Foods That Promote Sweating

The food you eat — and what you drink — could be causing you to sweat excessively. This usually happens when you eat food that’s hard to digest because your body has to work a bit harder, which increases your heart rate and sends signals to your sweat glands telling them to get to work.

Which Foods Cause Severe Sweating?

Red meat can be really hard for your body to digest, so if you’re worried about perspiring a lot during (or right after) a meal, you might want to stay away from burgers and steaks. Instead, choose chicken or fish. And of course, vegetables are always a great option. You should also avoid eating fatty fast foods, white bread, and chocolate. These foods lack the enzymes needed for smooth digestion, which means your body works harder to process them.

This probably doesn’t come as a big shock, but if you’re concerned about profuse sweating you should also avoid spicy, hot food. Yeah, those chili fries you love that are topped with jalapeno peppers are a MAJOR sweat trigger. Spicy foods contain capsaicin — a chemical that tricks your body into thinking your core temperature is rising, causing your sweat glands to kick into action, which causes you to perspire.

If you’ve been cursed with body odor that smells a bit fishy, you might have a condition called trimethylaminuria. It’s a genetic condition that makes it difficult for your body to break down trimethylamine — a chemical compound produced when you digest certain foods such as legumes, eggs, and fish. If this is the case, you should eliminate those foods from your diet and talk to your doctor.

4. You Need to Eat More

Are you hangry? If so, your blood sugar is probably a bit low. And one of the symptoms of low blood sugar is excessive sweat or cold sweats. In particular, the sweat glands along your hairline are affected by low blood sugar. So if you’re feeling a bit moody and sweaty, you really might need to grab a Snickers bar like the commercial says. Other symptoms of low blood sugar include:

  • Dizziness
  • Shakiness
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Blurred vision
  • Slight nausea

5. Your Mood (Extremely happy or scared out of your mind)

Did you know that when you’re happy or scared you sweat? This also happens when you’re doing something that you’re really passionate about (and no we aren’t just talking about sex).

You might have noticed that when you engage in activity that you’re passionate about, your body is all of the sudden covered in a thin layer of glistening sweat. That’s because all of these emotions — happiness, fear, and love — are associated with a slight increase in your body temperature. And of course, when your body temperature rises, your sweat glands go to work.

6. You Have Social Anxiety

If you get nervous before events that require you to socialize with others, you’ve probably noticed that your sweaty spurts also happen about the same time. That’s totally normal if you have social anxiety.

It’s common for people with social anxiety to constantly battle excessive hand sweating. But you can use relaxing techniques to help get you through overly stressful situations or talk to your doctor. There’s a good chance your doctor may be able to prescribe an anti-anxiety medication to help you control nervous bouts of sweating. Another great way to combat nervous sweat is by using a clinical strength antiperspirant like SweatBlock. If you’ve got excessive hand sweating or super sweaty feet, you can try a hand or foot antiperspirant to reduce unwanted sweating. We recommend this one.

7. You’re Really Fit or Overweight

Your physical fitness levels can determine the amount of sweat your body produces. For example, if you’re slightly plump around the middle, your body works harder carrying the excess weight. This causes your heart rate to increase and you to perspire. But people who are really, really fit often sweat a lot too. This is typically caused by sweating a lot when exercising. See, if you exercise regularly, your body gets really good at sweating so it does it more often. Of course, that doesn’t mean you should stop working out. Instead, use a clinical-strength antiperspirant, such as SweatBlock, to control the amount of sweat your body produces.

8. Your Medications Are Causing You to Sweat (Diaphoresis)

Diaphoresis is the medical term used to describe excessive sweating caused by certain medications. Some of the more common culprits include SSRIs, heart medications, and painkillers. But they aren’t the only medications that can make you sweat. So if you’re taking a new prescription and it’s causing heavy sweating randomly, you might want to have a chat with your doctor.

What to Do If Sweat Becomes Excessive

It’s important to remember that perspiration is a normal process. In fact, it’s even good for you to sweat. But if you sweat excessively, you should consider using a clinical-strength antiperspirant or talk to your doctor about treatment options.

How Does Sweating Help the Body?

You have approximately 2.5 million sweat glands on your body (some people have up to 4 million). So what you probably don’t realize is that you’re actually sweating all the time. You just don’t normally notice the sweat because it evaporates quickly. If your body produces sweat faster than it evaporates, it’s noticeable. That’s when excessive sweating can become embarrassing.

But sweating is actually good for you — at least in normal amounts. We sweat to regulate our body temperature. So if you didn’t sweat at all, your body would overheat — and no one wants to have heat stroke. If you think you sweat more than “normal,” you might be right. In this case, you might want to consult your doctor to determine whether you have hyperhidrosis or you have sweat triggers that you don’t know about. Even if you don’t have hyperhidrosis, your doctor will be able to help you determine the best way to keep your sweating in check.

How to Stop Sweating

Remember, you don’t want to stop sweating completely. But you may want to stop sweating in specific areas of your body. For example, if you sweat when you’re nervous, you probably have clammy hands. That can be embarrassing when you meet someone new or you’re on a date and you want to hold hands. If that’s the case, you should be looking for ways to stop sweating on your hands.

Who Treats Excessive Sweating?

If clinical-strength antiperspirants and other home remedies don’t keep you from sweating profusely, you should consult your doctor to see if you have hyperhidrosis. Your primary care doctor can discuss treatment options that can reduce sweating, such as prescription creams and medication, with you, but if the problem is severe, you might be referred to a dermatologist. A dermatologist is a doctor who treats skin conditions specifically. So he or she may discuss more elaborate treatment options, such as Botox, with you.

Ultimately, it’s important to remember that everyone sweats. Because everyone is different, there really isn’t a “normal” amount of sweat your body should produce. But if excessive sweating becomes a problem, makes you feel self-conscious, or keeps you from attending normal social events, you should talk to your doctor or see a dermatologist.

Do you struggle with nervous sweating? (aka anxiety sweating)

Does internal panic ensue at the slightest sign of sweat on your brow or the palms of your hands?

Do you melt with perspiration just thinking about your next social interaction?

It may not make you feel any better, but a lot of people experience this same kind of extreme, anxious sweating.

Some sweat is good… in fact, it’s critical to your health. But marathon-like sweating during a job interview or after a simple handshake is NOT good… EVER!

You should only sweat like you’ve just run a marathon… after running a marathon. Right?!

The truth is nervous sweat is a major distraction to living the life you want. It can negatively affect your career, social life, and relationships.

We think it’s unfair. Why should some people sweat more than others? Why does a pair of sweaty armpits get to dictate how you feel about yourself and how others feel about you?

If nervous sweat is a constant thorn in your side, here’s a few tips that might help calm your nerves and curb the sweat.

7 Ways to Stop Nervous Sweating

1. Don’t Panic

Don’t panic at the first drop of sweat. The fear of sweat is often the reason we end up sweating like a cold can of soda on sweltering day. The key is to prevent your body from switching into “fight or flight” mode. This survival mechanism will ultimately lead to increased breathing, blood flow, and sweating.

It may take some jedi mind trickery, but you need to FORGET the SWEAT. Convince yourself that sweat is no big deal and that your current situation (first date, job interview, etc…) doesn’t require you to run or fight for your life. Stay calm and don’t panic.

2. Relaxation + Meditation

When you feel a bit worked up, try a relaxation techniques to help you stay calm such as focusing on your breathing. Take slow, deep breaths, hold the breath in for a few seconds, and then, release it. Repeat the process until you feel calm again. Deep breathing slows down your heart rate, which in turn, helps prevent anxious sweating. Also, consider adding meditation sessions to your normal routine to help keep any unwanted stress at bay.

3. Exercise + Weight Loss

Regular exercise can help manage sweat-inducing stress. Less stress can result in less sweating. Another benefit of exercise is potential weight loss and increased confidence. The more confidence you have, the better you can handle potentially stressful situations.

4. Know your Sweat Triggers

Certain things can trigger excess sweat. Knowing these triggers can help you avoid sweaty situations and prepare for the unavoidable ones. Common sweat triggers include job interviews, dates and speaking in public. Some not-so-obvious triggers include caffeine, alcohol, spicy foods, and processed junk food. Medications, your clothes … even your very thoughts can trigger abnormal sweating. Know your sweat triggers and avoid them if possible.

5. Stay Hydrated

Drink plenty of H2O to keep your body temperature cool. This will reduce the amount of heat your body has to release in the form of sweat on your skin.

6. Be Prepared, Arm Yourself with a Strong Antiperspirant

Life happens. You can’t avoid every potentially stressful situation and you can’t live the rest of your days out in a cave. One way to combat nervous sweating is by using a clinical strength antiperspirant like SweatBlock. Unlike deodorants that simply mask odor, antiperspirants have the ability to block sweat. Arm yourself with a strong antiperspirant to reduce sweat and boost confidence.

Tip: Nervous sweat has a tendency to be stinky sweat. If you want to put a stop to the stink and the sweat, try a combination antiperspirant deodorant.

7. Dress Strategically

The strategy here is to dress in a way that doesn’t produce more sweat and doesn’t promote nervous sweat. Wear light, breathable fabrics that keep you cool. Wear patterns, darks, blacks or light jackets to hide sweat. Don’t promote your sweaty armpits by wearing solid colors, grays, and light blues. For sweaty hands and face, keep a handkerchief handy. You can quickly wipe away sweat before it compounds into extreme sweat.

Why We Sweat When We’re Nervous

Any type of excessive sweating can be embarrassing, but nervous sweating is probably the worst. Just think about it for a minute.

Have you ever…

  • Dealt with clammy hands on a first date?
  • Had beads of sweat appear all over your forehead before giving an important presentation at work?
  • Felt really anxious about something, and then, noticed that your feet are suddenly sliding around in puddles of sweat?

It’s not fun. But you don’t have to stop living your life to the fullest because of it either. Instead, learn more about why you’re prone to nervous sweating and how to deal with it once and for all.

Can Being Nervous Cause Sweating?

When you’re nervous it activates your stress hormones. And when activated, those hormones cause your body temperature and heart rate to increase slightly. This sends a message to your sweat glands telling them it’s time to produce sweat to cool your body off a bit.

Unfortunately, this isn’t a process that you can control. The best thing you can do to avoid nervous sweating completely is to practice different stress and anxiety-relieving techniques, such as deep breathing, to keep yourself as calm as possible. If you do this every time you start to feel nervous, stressed, or anxious, there’s a good chance you can prevent nervous sweating altogether. But if it doesn’t work, there are plenty of other things you can try too.

What Causes Nervous Sweating?

When it comes to being nervous, anxious, or stressed, everyone has their own triggers. You might become really nervous before an important meeting or before you have to give a big speech, while others may be really nervous when they meet someone for the first time or any time they go on a date. Of course, if you’re in a situation that makes you nervous, the last thing you want to do is start sweating profusely.

Unfortunately, all of these feelings send red flags to your body telling it that you’re on the brink of overheating. So your body starts producing extra sweat in an effort to stay cool. It’s a completely natural process that’s totally annoying and embarrassing.

When you know you’ll be faced with a circumstance that’s a trigger for you, do everything you can to remain calm. The calmer you stay, the less likely you are to start sweating. We know this can be hard to do. To help, wipe your problem areas down with a SweatBlock towelette in advance if possible. This will reduce the amount of sweat your body produces, giving you one less thing to be stressed about.

Which Nervous System Controls Sweating?

The sympathetic nervous system controls sweating. It’s part of the autonomic nervous system, which controls your body functions that you don’t consciously direct such as your heartbeat and breathing.

The sympathetic nervous system is the portion of the autonomic nervous system that triggers your body’s fight-or-flight response. So any time you’re nervous, scared, anxious, or stressed, it tells your sweat glands to start working so that you don’t overheat internally. Basically, this system works to protect you from the inside out.

How to Treat Nervous Sweating

There are several ways to treat nervous sweating, but there isn’t one treatment or remedy that works for everyone. So it’s important to try different types of treatments until you find one that works for your body. For most people, it’s a combination of home remedies or antiperspirants and prevention techniques.

How to Calm Nervous Sweating

The key to calming nervous sweating is calming yourself. You can’t control the amount of sweat your body produces, but you can control the way you feel — to an extent. There are two ways you should approach this problem.

First, you should try to work on the reason you’re nervous in certain situations. For example, if you get so nervous during dates that you get really sweaty hands, you might want to try working on your confidence. Consider making it a point to talk to strangers casually as much as possible. Eventually, you’ll start feeling comfortable and confident holding conversations with people you don’t know well. The added confidence you gain can help stay calm on your next date. The same technique can be used if you’re nervous about speaking in front of an audience. Practice your speeches at home, in front of friends and family members, and work your way up to speaking in front of larger crowds.

In addition to working on the main causes of your nervousness, you should practice calming techniques. These can help calm you down any time you find yourself in a situation that makes you feel nervous.

Take slow, deep breaths until you feel yourself calm down.

Remove yourself from the situation for a few minutes to give yourself time to calm down.

Practice mindfulness meditation to focus on the present. This allows you to focus on the moment realistically, instead of focusing on your fears or expectations surrounding the moment. To do this, focus on specific sights or sounds nearby. This brings you back into the present moment and gets you out of your head.

How to Stop Nervous Sweating Naturally

To stop nervous sweating naturally, the best thing to do is work on your mindset. You get nervous because you have specific thoughts, expectations, or fears surrounding certain tasks or events. For example, if you constantly think that other people are judging you or have a bad perception of you, it may make you nervous to speak in front of groups or meet new people. It’s thoughts like these that are rooted in your anxiety. If you make a conscious effort to flip the negative thoughts into positive ones, you’ll start to feel more confident and are less likely to become nervous.

Additionally, you can try different home remedies designed to keep you calm such as:

Eat more fish. Omega-3 fatty acids work to protect against depression and anxiety.

Eat a protein-filled breakfast every day. Low levels of choline are associated with increased anxiety, and eating protein at breakfast helps regulate your levels throughout the day.

Grab a snack. Anxiety and nervousness often set in when your blood sugar levels are a bit low, so grab a quick snack.

Exercise regularly. When you exercise on a regular basis it helps eliminate lingering depression and anxiety. It makes you feel healthier, which automatically boosts your self-esteem.

Preventing Nervous Sweating on the Face

When your nervous sweat appears on your head, face, or neck, it’s hard to hide — which of course, makes it even more embarrassing. Fortunately, there are a few things you can do to help prevent nervous sweating on your face.

Our top recommendation for head, face, and neck sweating is using SweatBlock — and no we aren’t just tooting our own horn. It actually does work. Before you go to bed at night, wipe down your face and neck with a SweatBlock towelette. Then, go to sleep and let SweatBlock work its magic. When you’re sleeping, your sweat glands aren’t as active. So the clinical-strength antiperspirant on the towelette can easily get into your pores. While one nighttime treatment is enough to reduce the amount of sweat you produce for between four and seven days, you can also carry a SweatBlock towelette with you — just in case.

Speaking of towelettes, you can also carry alcohol wipes with you to use in the event of an emergency. If a situation arises that makes you nervous, quickly wiping down your face with an alcohol wipe will close your pores so excessive amounts of sweat can’t escape. If you wear makeup, consider wiping your face down with an alcohol wipe before applying your makeup to close your pores. Keep in mind though, alcohol is very drying. You might want to also use a lightweight moisturizer to keep your skin hydrated properly.

You should also drink plenty of water throughout the day to stay hydrated. When your body is properly hydrated, your body temperature doesn’t rise as easily. And because you produce sweat when your body temperature starts to rise, it’s important to keep your internal temperature as cool as possible to prevent sweating. Also, avoid eating food that’s spicy, hot, or filled with sodium. They automatically make your body temperature rise a bit.

If you can’t find a natural remedy for nervous sweating on your head, neck, or face, you might consider getting botox treatments. When used to treat excessive sweating, botox treatments are done a bit differently than they are when they are used to get rid of wrinkles and age lines. The botox gets injected at specific points, numbing the nerves in the area completely. This way, when your brain tries to signal the nerves to produce sweat, it doesn’t work.

Dealing with Sweaty Hands

It’s common for people struggling with nervous sweating to get clammy hands regularly. This can make a simple handshake practically unbearable. Unfortunately, if the thought of shaking someone’s hand makes you panic, you automatically produce more sweat. And because there are more sweat glands in the palms of your hands than other areas of your body, your hands can get sweaty real quick.

Basically, it’s a Catch-22. The more you worry about your clammy hands, the more they sweat. So what do you do? Well, you don’t have let the thought of having sweaty hands deter you. Instead, follow these tips to reduce the amount of sweat your hands produce.

1. Carry Alcohol Wipes

Wipe your hands with alcohol wipes to dry out your hands before important social interactions. It’s a very temporary fix, but it may just help you avoid some akward handshakes and handholding. Alcohol based hand sanitizers can also work.

2. Try Hand Antiperspirant

Want a more effective treatment for sweaty hands? Try a topical antiperspirant cream or lotion. We recommend our specialized SweatBlock hand antiperspirant.

3. Use Body Powder to Absorb Hand Sweat

If you feel like your hands are starting to get clammy, rub a bit of body powder between them to absorb any excess moisture. Consider carrying a travel-size bottle with you or keeping one in your desk at work to use as needed.

4. Soak your hands in vinegar

Soak your hands in a mixture of warm water and white vinegar two to three times per week for about 20 minutes. The warm water opens your pores, allowing the white vinegar to work its way into them. When you remove your hands from the mixture, run them under cold water for about 20 seconds to close your pores back up. The white vinegar helps reduce the amount of sweat your palms produce and closing up the pores when you’re done, prevent sweat from seeping out of them. This is also a good option for anyone with excessively sweaty feet.

How to Combat Nervous Sweating in Public

If you’re worried about nervous sweating in public situations, it’s important to do whatever you can to reduce the amount of sweat your body produces before you leave your home. The more prepared you are, the easier it is to avoid profuse sweating in public, and if it does happen, you won’t need to worry because you’ve already prepared yourself to hide it.

Wear an undershirt beneath your clothing to trap excess sweat before it can stain your outer layer of clothing. This helps prevent embarrassing pit stains or sweat stains on other parts of your clothes.

Wear sweat guards underneath your clothes. Sweat guards are made to sit in the armpit area of your shirt. They absorb excess sweat so that it doesn’t stain your clothing and isn’t noticeable to people around you.

Use clinical-strength antiperspirant. You can purchase a deodorant that includes a clinical-strength antiperspirant to use on your underarm area. Or you can purchase antiperspirant wipes, such as SweatBlock, to use on other areas of your body.

Do your best to stay out of the heat and sun. The cooler you are, the less sweat your body produces. So you don’t want to do anything that causes you to sweat more.

Discuss Nervous Sweating With Your Doctor

It’s common for people battling nervous sweating to avoid talking to others about it because they are embarrassed or feel alone. But the condition is actually really common, and your doctor may be able to help you with the problem.

In most cases, doctors and dermatologists suggest that their patients try different remedies before they prescribe medication. But if you’ve already exhausted every home remedy you know and clinical-strength antiperspirant isn’t working, it might be time for a prescription.

Because your excessive sweating is caused by your nervousness, your doctor may suggest an anti-depressant or anti-anxiety medication to help regulate your moods.

There are also oral prescription medications that reduce the amount of sweat you produce, but your doctor may feel that a topical prescription medication is the better option for you.

Topical prescription meds come in cream form and can be applied as needed. So before you go into a situation that you know will make you nervous, simply apply the cream to the areas of your body that sweat the most. The cream works in the same way as an alcohol wipe or SweatBlock towelettes. It closes the pores and dries up the area to keep it sweat free. The only difference is that instead of being clinical strength, the medication is prescription strength, which is why it’s typically used only when other options aren’t working.

Ultimately, the key to combating nervous sweating is to do whatever you can to remain as calm as possible. If that’s not possible, you should try a combination of natural treatments to combat your excessive sweating. And if all else fails, consult your doctor. He or she may be able to prescribe medication that helps prevent you from sweating so much.