Can caffeine make you sweat? Yes!

After all, it is a stimulant.

Although legal, the caffeine found in coffee and tea is still a drug, and it can make you sweat by speeding up the central nervous system (CNS).

In fact, the more caffeine you drink, the more likely you are to perspire.

Yikes!

If excessive sweating is a problem for you, cutting back on caffeine loaded products like these may help reduce unwanted sweat:

  • Coffee
  • Tea
  • Energy drinks
  • Soft drinks
  • Chocolate (yep…chocolate)
  • Over-the-counter stimulants (NoDoz and other caffeine pills)
  • Over-the-counter pain medications (Excedrin)
  • Pre-workout and weight loss supplements1

But according to researchers, you shouldn’t have to worry about side effects like sweating if you drink less than 300-400 mg a day. 2

Of course, there are some exceptions, but more on that later…

For now, let’s take an in-depth look at the science of caffeine and sweating:

What Is Caffeine?

Caffeine is a chemical stimulant in the methylxanthine class of psychoactive drugs.

It increases alertness and changes the way your brain and body function via the central nervous system (CNS).

Caffeine also impacts the cardiovascular and endocrine systems by elevating heart rate and boosting stress hormone production.

Why Does Caffeine Make You Sweat?

If you drink coffee or energy drinks daily and you’re wondering “why do I sweat so much?“, caffeine may be to blame for that extra sweat.

There are between 1.6 and 5 million sweat glands spread across the human skin. 6

When you’re stressed (or when you drink too much caffeine), the nervous system tells the body to release stress hormones like adrenaline and cortisol, elevates heart rate, and secretes sweat to cool the body and balance fluids.

There are two types of sweat glands: eccrine glands and apocrine glands…

Eccrine Glands vs. Apocrine Glands

Eccrine sweat glands regulate body temperature and are found in virtually every square millimeter of the skin, and they’re mostly concentrated in the forehead, palms, and soles of the feet.

This type of sweat is 98-99 percent water and does not cause body odor.

Apocrine sweat glands produce the majority of stress-related sweat, and they’re found in the armpits, groin, nipples, and eyelids.

Unlike eccrine sweat, apocrine sweat contains fats that deteriorate when mixed with bacteria on the skin…and body odor is born!

Does Coffee Make You Sweat?

Coffee is the most popular caffeine source worldwide, and if you drink enough of it, it can make you sweat.

In addition to sweating, high doses of coffee may cause symptoms like anxiety, dehydration, and dizziness.

The average 5 oz coffee contains about 85 mg of caffeine. 3

Does Decaf Coffee Make You Sweat?

Some people drink coffee for the energy boost, others drink it for the taste.

If you aren’t ready to part ways with coffee, decaf can a great way to cut back on caffeine.

A lot of people don’t know this, but decaf still contains at least 3 mg of caffeine per 5 oz cup, and many brands contain 7 mg or more. 3

Does Tea Make You Sweat?

Although tea contains less caffeine than coffee, it can still trigger sweating in high doses.

However, green and black teas have one major upside: they contain a potent nutrient called L-theanine that may help balance the stimulatory effects of caffeine…

L-theanine is an amino acid that boosts gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter that reduces stress and calms brain activity.

The average bag of tea contains 30 mg of caffeine, although some black tea contains up to 40 mg or more. 3

Do Energy Drinks Make You Sweat?

Together, caffeine and sugar can supercharge the nervous system and increase the risk of sweating, and as it turns out, energy drinks have plenty of both.

Luckily, most brands have dialed-back their caffeine content over the years, but the average energy drink still contains the same amount of caffeine as two cups of coffee.

For example, Monster energy drinks contain 79.2 mg of caffeine per serving, or 158.4 mg per can. 4

Does Soda Make You Sweat?

If you want to say sayonara to sweating, you’ll have to ditch the soda too.

Like energy drinks, caffeinated sodas deliver a heavy-hitting combo of sugar and caffeine.

On average, soda contains 18 milligrams of caffeine in every 6-ounce serving. For example, one can of Coke contains 29.4 mg of caffeine. 5

Does Chocolate Make You Sweat?

Cocoa beans are closely related to coffee beans, and yes, they contain caffeine too.

There’s roughly 4 milligrams of caffeine in every 5 ounces of hot chocolate and 1.5-6.0 mg in every ounce of chocolate candy. 3

With that said, unless you have underlying medical conditions, you shouldn’t have to worry about sweating from chocolate.

How Much Caffeine Can You Drink Without Sweating?

According to a 2017 meta-analysis of 381 clinical trials and lab tests, the maximum daily caffeine dose is 400 mg for adults and 300 mg for pregnant women. 7

Another study recommends drinking less than 6 mg per kg of bodyweight to avoid side effects like poor calcium absorption and male infertility. 8

In other words, if you drink two cups of coffee or less, you should be in the clear.

With that said, caffeine-sensitive individuals should drink much less (or avoid it entirely)…

Are You Sensitive To Caffeine?

Because caffeine stays in your system for four to six hours, it can be easy to drink too much and feel anxious, hot, and sweaty.

Doses greater than 400 mg/day may cause caffeine overdose in healthy adults, but for sensitive individuals, negative side effects can occur at much lower doses.

Common side effects of caffeine overdose include:

  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Vomiting and other digestive issues
  • Diarrhea
  • Anxiety
  • Feeling “edgy”
  • Confusion
  • Dizziness
  • Fever
  • Changes in alertness
  • Muscle twitching
  • Dehydration
  • Increased urination
  • Sweating

Increased sweating and urination are the body’s attempt to eliminate the extra caffeine and return to homeostasis.

Risk Factors of Caffeine and Hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating)

Hyperhidrosis is a medical condition characterized by excessive sweating. Drinking too much caffeine or coffee can trigger similar symptoms.

For example, a 2014 study published in the journal Menopause found a connnection between high caffeine intake and increased night sweats in postmenopausal women. 9

At the same time, a 2011 study found that caffeine can increase sweating by affecting the sudomotor nerves. 10

Common risk factors for the caffeine sweats include:

  • Pregnancy
  • Diabetes
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Autoimmune disease
  • Obesity
  • Menopause
  • Overactive sympathetic nerves
  • Infection
  • Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland)
  • Hyperpituitarism (overactive pituitary gland)
  • Social anxiety disorder

At the same time, it’s best to avoid foods like curry, hot sauce, and cumin as well as alcohol.

Of course, if symptoms are severe enough, there’s also a chance that you may have full-blown hyperhidrosis…

Signs and Symptoms of Hyperhidrosis

Everyone sweats, but if you sweat even when you don’t need to cool down, you might have hyperhidrosis.

According to a report by the Archives of Dermatological Research, hyperhidrosis affects roughly 15 million people in the U.S. alone, and it can seriously impact your quality of life.11

Common symptoms include:

  • Sweating that interferes with daily tasks
  • Visible sweating
  • Night sweats
  • Uncomfortable wetness in the groin, hands, feet, and underarms
  • Frequent skin infections like athlete’s foot

Some people get so sweaty that they may even struggle to turn doorknobs or grip the steering wheel.

If necessary, your dermatologist can recommend treatments like prescription antiperspirants or anticholinergics: a class of medications that affect the nerves that cause sweating.

However, if sweating only occurs when you drink a lot of caffeine, staying dry may be as simple as cutting back on caffeinated drinks.

References:

  • 1: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3625078/
  • 2: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278691517301709
  • 3: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8603790
  • 4: https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/171935/nutrients
  • 5: https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/175093/nutrients
  • 6: https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/sweat-gland
  • 7: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278691517301709
  • 8: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12519715
  • 9: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140723105945.htm
  • 10: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21883004
  • 11: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5099353/
does coffee make you sweat?

If you’ve struggled with sweaty hands, you’ve likely experienced the following…

  • Embarrassing, sweaty handshakes that sabotage first impressions.
  • Clammy hands that keep you from holding hands with that special someone.
  • Constant hand perspiration that soaks keyboards, paperwork and game controllers.

While the perfect sweaty hands cure may not exist, the remedies listed here can provide some relief from the embarrassment of hand sweating.

Before we break down these tips in detail, let’s explore what causes sweaty hands.

Why are my hands always sweaty?

Most people experience sweaty palms during stressful situations, anxious moments, high temperatures, or physical exertion.

For example, it’s not uncommon to get clammy hands during a tense movie, playing your favorite video game, climbing, or weightlifting.

These activities and higher stress levels will raise your body temperature. This makes your sweat glands release extra heat via sweat. Unfortunately, your palms don’t get a pass on this cooling/sweating process.

If your hands are always sweating or sweating excessively, it could be something more…

Here are some common causes of sweaty hands:

  • Anxiety and Emotional Stress
  • Palmar Hyperhidrosis
  • Genetics
  • Hormones
  • Physical Activity
  • Hot Environments
  • Diet
  • Underlying Health Conditions
  • Prescription Drugs and Medications

We’ll talk more about these later. Let’s cut to the chase… how do you get rid of sweaty hands?

prevent sweaty hands.

11 Ways to Stop Sweaty Hands

Here it is… the list you’ve been waiting for. Here’s 11 ways to prevent excessive hand sweating with lifestyle changes, antiperspirants, home remedies and medical procudures for palmar hyperhidrosis.

1. Antiperspirant for Hands

Antiperspirant is the easiest proven way to control sweating. Antiperspirants work by plugging and shrinking your sweat pores. As a result, you’ll sweat less wherever you apply antiperspirant.

Will any antiperspirant work for hands? Antiperspirant sticks, roll-ons and sprays are ideal for treating sweaty armpits, but lotions, creams and gels are better suited for hand and feet application.

Before you get all crazy with natural remedies and medical procedures, try an antiperspirant lotion for hands.

How does antiperspirant lotion work? Dab a pea-sized amount of hand antiperspirant on your palms, rub it in, and let it dry for 3-5 minutes.

If hands are wet or sweaty during application, the antiperspirant lotion will NOT keep hands from sweating.

Depending on your sweat severity, hand antiperspirants can reduce sweating for 1 to 3 hours per application.

You can apply when needed to avoid potentially embarrassing situations like awkward handshakes, slippery handholding, etc…

2. Alcohol-Based Hand Wipes

If you don’t want to use antiperspirant, try using alcohol-based hand wipes. Alcohol is an astringent that, when applied topically, can help keep your hands temporarily dry with its pore-shrinking abilities.

This useful trick comes in handy right before an important interview or social event.

If your hands sweat excessively, you’ll want to stick with an antiperspirant lotion or a hyperhidrosis treatment.

3. Absorb Sweat with Cornstarch or Baby Powder

Baby powder absorbs liquids. So every time you start to feel sweat on your hands, simply dust them with a small bit of baby powder.

Consider carrying a travel-size bottle with you or keep one at work to use throughout the day. Look for a talc-free powder or you can use baking soda or cornstarch.

4. Drink Water… Lots of it.

Drink a generous amount of water throughout the day. Staying hydrated can cool your core temperature and help reduce excessive sweating.

5. Diet and Detox

If you’re searching for a sweaty hands cure? Food might be the “best medicine”.

Did you know that your diet can impact your sweating? Certain foods will increase your sweating while other foods can help you sweat less.

A healthy diet leads to balance and a healthier body. A poor diet leads to imbalance — physical, emotional, and mental.

Imbalance can lead to chronic illness, weight gain, anxiety, and you guessed it: excessive sweating.

Less bad stuff + more good stuff = a happier, healthier, and less-sweaty you.

Examine your diet. You might be able to calm your sweaty hands with a few simple tweaks.

Start with avoiding caffeine, alcoholic beverages, and spicy, fatty, fried, and processed foods.

All of these foods can raise your body temperature and increase heart rate. When your body temperature rises, you perspire more to release the extra heat.

You’ll also want to replace the bad stuff with good food options like whole grains and almonds.

Vitamins B and D can also be very useful in promoting balance.

Here are a few of our favorite vitamin-rich food sources:

  • Low-fat or skim milk
  • Calcium-rich foods
  • Olive oil

You should also add fruits and vegetables that have a high water content to your diet. Like regularly drinking water, they help keep your body hydrated, which regulates your body temperature. Some options include:

  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Watermelon
  • Strawberries
  • Grapefruit
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Plums
  • Oranges
  • Lettuce
  • Zucchini
  • Radishes
  • Celery

 

6. Sage Tea Soak

Sage is known as Mother Nature’s antiperspirant. It contains a natural astringent called tannic acid. The tannic acid has the ability to constrict and shrink your skin and pores. This shrinking helps reduce sweat just like an antiperspirant.

How it works:

  • 1. Add 4-5 sage tea bags to a quart of boiling water.
  • 2. Let the tea steep until it’s cool enough to touch.
  • 3. Once cooled, soak your hands in the sage solution for 30 minutes.

Feeling Brave? Some “experts” claim that drinking sage tea can also reduce excessive sweat. Just make sure you don’t drink the tea you used to soak your hands. This also works well for sweaty feet.

7. Organic Rose Water

Rose water can be purchased from any store that sells makeup and skincare products because it’s typically used as a skin toner. It works by closing the pores in your skin, which reduces the amount of sweat produced.

To use rose water on your sweaty hands, dip a cotton ball in it then, rub the cotton ball over your palms and let it dry.

Lemon juice and apple cider vinegar can also be applied to your hands this way, but if you use either of them, you should rinse your hands off once they dry. As an alternative, you can also use witch hazel.

8. Coconut Oil

After your daily shower, take a small bit of coconut oil and rub it between your palms until they are fully coated. Coconut oil is a natural antiperspirant and it has several other skin-related benefits so it will help keep your hands soft to the touch too.

9. Regular Exercise

It might seem odd to you to see exercising on a list of home remedies for sweaty hands. After all, when you exercise, you sweat. The thing is, exercise also helps reduce the amount of stress your body is going through.

Because of this, your body’s core temperature sits lower on a regular basis, which reduces the amount of sweat your body produces overall.

It’s a good idea to fit in about 30 minutes or so of exercise five days per week. If you don’t want to hit the gym, consider taking a walk or riding a bike through your neighborhood each evening. Just don’t exercise too close to bedtime or you could have a hard time falling asleep.

10. Botox Injections

When used to treat excessive sweating in small areas — such as the palms of your hands — botox has been known to effectively reduce between 82 and 87 percent of sweating.

However, when used to treat sweaty hands, you have to get injections every six months and it can cause temporary pain and weakness in your hands. Because of this, it’s best to discuss all of your options with your doctor before trying botox injections.

11. Iontophoresis Treatments

There is also a treatment available for palmar hyperhidrosis called iontophoresis. This treatment has been known to reduce the amount of sweat produced in one’s hands by up to 81 percent, but the treatment can be a bit painful so it’s typically used as a last resort.

The treatment uses a medical device to pass a mild electrical current through water and the skin’s surface.

No one is 100 percent sure how this works to prevent sweaty hands, but it’s thought that the electrical current and the minerals in the water thicken the outer layer of your skin, which in turn, blocks the sweat from getting to the surface.

You can have this treatment completed in your doctor’s office. Or if you prefer to complete the treatments at home, your doctor can write you a prescription that lets you purchase the medical device.

In some areas, the tap water is too “soft” for the treatment to work. Basically, this means that the water doesn’t have enough minerals and electrolytes. If this is the case in your area, you can add a teaspoon of baking soda to your treatment tray.

Anxiety, stress, and nervousness are actually some of the main culprits of sweaty hands.

In fact, you’ve probably noticed that your hands start sweating before you have to speak in front of an audience or during a first date. It’s completely normal.

Stress, anxiety, and nervousness are all feelings that trigger a fight-or-flight response in our bodies. These responses release the stress hormones cortisol and epinephrine.

While the hormones help you cope with whatever is making you anxious, they raise your body temperature too. Of course, your body sweats to regulate your temperature, so when you’re anxious, your sweat glands are activated.

Are Sweaty Palms Genetic?

If your hands consistently perspire, you might have inherited a few bad genes. Excessively sweaty palms can actually skip generations, so it’s possible that you inherited the problem even if your parents don’t have it.

According to studies, two-thirds of patients with hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating) have a family member with the same condition.

Hand sweat is normal, but for some, it happens in Niagara Falls-like proportions and for absolutely no reason at all. This type of sweating is called palmar hyperhidrosis.

What is Palmar Hyperhidrosis?

Palmar Hyperhidrosis is excessive and uncontrollable sweating of the hands or palms.

If this describes your situation, you’re not alone. Palmar Hyperhidrosis affects about one percent of the American population.

While anyone can suffer sweaty hands periodically, if the situation persists it is important to seek a medical assessment from a dermatologist to determine if you have palmar hyperhidrosis.

Symptoms can appear anytime, regardless of your age, but they commonly appear during adolescence, and in some cases persist throughout life.

What Causes Palmar Hyperhidrosis?

Experts don’t know the exact reason for sweaty palms. Some believe that a hyperactive sympathetic nervous system could be the cause.

The sympathetic nervous system manages the fight-or-flight response which releases adrenaline, increases heart rate, constricts blood vessels, and controls sweating. In other words, a hyperactive sympathetic nervous system can result in hyper hand sweating.

Palmar hyperhidrosis can wreck confidence and cause extreme stress. This can impact social interactions as well as professional ones, causing real issues in every aspect of your life.

In fact, many dermatologists believe that palmar hyperhidrosis causes a more significant negative impact on patient’s lives than any other dermatological condition.

sweaty hands

Axillary hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating of the armpits.

It’s uncomfortable, frustrating, demoralizing, and can profoundly affect the quality of life. It’s not always easy to say how much excess sweating is “too much” – it’s different from patient to patient, but there are a few signs you should watch for that may mean you could use some advice from a doctor.

4 Signs It’s Time to See a Doctor About Your Sweaty Armpits

  • 1. Nothing effectively stops armpit sweating
  • 2. You frequently sweat through your shirts
  • 3. You constantly worry about armpit sweat
  • 4. Your quality of life is suffering due to unwanted underarm sweat

To an outside observer, sweaty armpits may seem like no big deal – just a cosmetic inconvenience with no serious side effects.

But axillary hyperhidrosis sufferers know their sweat can wreck everything from first dates to major work presentations.

In fact, from the pit stains to the stench and embarrassment, sweaty underarms can take over your life unless you take control of them.

But you’re not alone and you’re not helpless – you have a number of options to help you get sweaty pits under control and get back to living your best life.

Keep reading for a guide to how to treat your sweaty underarms, along with signs to look for that you might need to talk with your doctor about axillary hyperhidrosis treatment.

What is Axillary Hyperhidrosis?

People who suffer from axillary hyperhidrosis sweat like crazy under their arms – in fact, they can sweat up to five times more than is needed to regulate their body temperature.

The causes of axillary hyperhidrosis aren’t super clear, but we do know that up to 3 percent of the population suffers from hyperhidrosis in some form.

Axillary hyperhidrosis is considered a form of primary hyperhidrosis, which means it is a medical condition in and of itself, and not a side effect of something else, like an underlying medical condition or a medication.

There is some indication that primary axillary hyperhidrosis is genetic, so if you have family members who show symptoms, chances are you may, too.

Axillary hyperhidrosis often begins around adolescence, but some people may not see symptoms until their mid-20s.

4 Signs It’s Time to See a Doctor About Your Sweaty Underarms

Let’s explore in more detail each of the signs that it may be time to see a doctor about treatment for your profuse sweating.

1. Nothing effectively stops armpit sweating

You’ve tried everything you can think of in terms of life hacks and over-the-counter options to stop axillary hyperhidrosis, but nothing seems to be working.

Rather than continuing to go it alone, this may be a good opportunity to consult with your dermatologist about how to take your treatments for axillary hyperhidrosis to the next level.

2. You frequently sweat through your shirts

Whether you’re sweating through undershirts or wringing out your socks during your lunch break, constantly changing into dry, clean clothes can be stressful and exhausting.

If you’re feeling like you need to carry around an extra suitcase full of backup clothes, you may benefit from talking to your doctor about appropriate hyperhidrosis treatment options for you.

3. You constantly worry about armpit sweat

Non-stop worry about sweat stains and armpit odor can be exhausting. If you’re spending crazy amounts of mental and physical energy trying to anticipate and prepare for sweat events, or you shower multiple times a day and constantly shopping for the best deodorant, you may be at a point where you need to ask for some outside help.

4. Your quality of life is suffering due to unwanted underarm sweat

If you’ve reached the point where you’ve either severely limited or stopped your favorite social and professional activities altogether, you may need some advice or assistant from your doctor.

Many people report that they avoid going out in public, socializing with friends, or volunteering for bigger professional projects out of fear of embarrassment related to their axillary hyperhidrosis.

Ultimately, this can lead to reduced self-esteem, lack of confidence, social anxiety, and even loss of concentration or engagement at work. If this describes your situation, it’s a good time to get help from your doctor for how to sweat less.

How Axillary Hyperhidrosis is Diagnosed

Typically, a dermatologist is the best physician to diagnose and treat underarm hyperhidrosis. These skin docs are usually the most familiar with the condition and hyperhidrosis therapy.

Depending on your insurance coverage, you may need to start with your primary care physician, who likely can give you a referral to a dermatologist.

It’s hard for a doctor to actually watch you sweat during an office visit, so your doctor may ask you lots of questions to help get a feel for the full impact of your symptoms. You should be prepared to discuss your medical history, including a list of any medications and supplements you take.

Your doctor will probably also ask about whether anyone else in your family shows similar symptoms, when your symptoms started, whether symptoms are occasional or continuous, and what factors either aggravate or seem to help your symptoms.

It’s pretty gross, but your doctor might also want to look at some of your clothing to measure sweat stains – that can be a good clue to the severity of your armpit hyperhidrosis.

For example, sweat stains of less than five centimeters in diameter may be considered normal, while stains up to 10 centimeters may indicate mild hyperhidrosis. Severe hyperhidrosis can make sweat stains up to 20 centimeters in diameter.

In some cases, your doctor may use gravimetric measurement to assess your situation – this is a more quantitative method that uses pre-weighed filter paper applied to the skin of your underarm area, then weighed so that the rate of sweat production can be calculated.

In addition to this measure, a doctor will take into consideration your description of how your symptoms are affecting your overall quality of life and impairing any daily activities.

An especially good tool for this is the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale offered by the International Hyperhidrosis Society. Some physicians may also use the Dermatology Quality of Life Index – or some other symptom severity scale.

Your doctor may also order lab tests of blood or urine or other tests to make sure your sweating isn’t caused by an underlying medical condition like diabetes or an overactive thyroid.

In general, once your doctor has decided that axillary hyperhidrosis is your issue, he or she will start you on minimally invasive treatment and go from there.

Axillary Hyperhidrosis Treatment Options

There is no silver-bullet axillary hyperhidrosis cure, but you can treat it with several different over-the-counter options, including topical agents, or clinical procedures for hyperhidrosis relief.

You can also combine various options to find the best effect for your body chemistry. If nothing else works, you do also have surgery options that you can discuss with your doctor.

Antiperspirants

Topical antiperspirants are often the first line of defense for hyperhidrosis relief. They work by forming a temporary “plug” that prevents your underarm sweat glands from releasing sweat.

You can find antiperspirants in a broad range of strengths – even clinical or prescription strength – so you may need to experiment to find the one that works best for you.

In addition, you must use antiperspirants correctly to feel their full benefits. Applying an antiperspirant at night is essential – doing so gives it time to work overnight, when axillary sweat glands are least active, in order to block sweat glands and keep you from pouring sweat the next day.

Typically, a doctor will advise that you start with an over-the-counter antiperspirant to test its efficacy.

If that works for you, then great. If not, you can advance to a clinical-strength antiperspirant – and if that still fails to control excessive underarm sweating, your doctor may prescribe a prescription-strength antiperspirant for you.

Botox

At some point, your physician may recommend botulinum toxin injections (Botox) as treatment of hyperhidrosis. With this method, an experienced medical professional will inject Botox into your underarm area in order to reduce sweating.

This method has proven effective in many cases – in fact, one clinical study showed that 81 percent of patients treated with Botox injections experienced a 50-percent or higher reduction in excessive underarm sweating.

Some patients saw a dramatic reduction in sweating that lasted up to a year.

miraDry

Approved by the FDA in 2011, miraDry is an option that uses thermal energy to destroy sweat glands in the underarm area.

Patient studies suggest miraDry has proven largely successful as a treatment for axillary hyperhidrosis, but it has not yet been approved for use anywhere else on the body.

Clinical trials have shown an average sweat-reduction efficacy rate of 82 percent.

Surgery or Other Medical Procedures

When all other options have been exhausted, some physicians may recommend dermatologic surgery or an outpatient procedure in order to treat your axillary hyperhidrosis.

There are a variety of surgical procedures you could try – they include curettage, liposuction, excision, and laser surgical procedures.

No matter the technique, all of these procedures are designed to surgically remove sweat glands from your underarm area. Each treatment can be performed with a local anesthetic as an outpatient procedure.

In extremely severe cases, your doctor may discuss with you a thoracic sympathectomy, which is a much more complicated and risky procedure.

Dermatologists have seen positive results with many of these techniques, but you should fully discuss with your doctor all of the potential risks and possibly severe adverse events before you decide if any of these procedures make sense for you.

Try Sweatblock

Many people seeking to treat hyperhidrosis have found success by using Sweatblock Clinical Strength Antiperspirant.

While Sweatblock is available in several formulations, its base product is a clinical-strength-antiperspirant formula that is pre-soaked on a soft towelette wipe.

Users simply swipe a Sweatblock wipe under their arms at night before going to sleep, and the trade-secret formula helps keep underarms dry and comfortable for up to seven days after use – and with no skin irritation.

For many users, Sweatblock has proven effective even when many other antiperspirants have come up short.

Understanding Axillary Hyperhidrosis

If not effectively treated, axillary hyperhidrosis can take a serious toll on the quality of life, keeping people from reaching their full potential and, in worst cases, leading to mental health concerns like anxiety and depression.

But the good news is that many treatment options are available to help people manage excessive underarm sweating. You might find exactly what you need with one of the remedies outlined here, or even with a combination of tactics.

Ultimately, the best way to manage your axillary hyperhidrosis is a personal choice, but you should make it after talking with a doctor you trust.

It’s always best to seek the counsel of a qualified medical professional before starting any clinical procedure or surgery for axillary hyperhidrosis.