Tips to beat sweating and hyperhidrosis.

body wipes

In this modern age of smart watches, home automation and self driving cars we tend to forget the essential conveniences in life. Flushing toilets, indoor plumbing, and warm showers come to mind.

All it takes is a weekend camping trip to help us remember how amazing showers and running water really are. Is there a better feeling than washing all the dirt, sweat and campfire residue from your body after a weekend of “roughing it”?

Just imagine how bad people smelled 200 years ago? Especially when bathing was a luxury available only to the upper classes of society.

We live in an exciting time when bathhouses have been replaced with Apple stores and every home has a shower or bath.

But even in this age of mind-blowing technological advancement, we often find ourselves without access to a shower.

The mid-day workout, the afternoon round of golf, the bike ride to work; these are the times you really need a shower – but don’t have the time or access to one.

Wouldn’t it be amazing if someone invented a portable shower? One that you could carry around in your pocket?

Oh wait… someone already did. It’s called a shower wipe.

When you can’t find a shower or just don’t have time for one, you’ll appreciate this nifty little invention. It’s an over-sized body wipe that quickly gets you clean and fresh… no matter where you are.

Here are 9 reasons you should consider packing shower wipes along with your other prized possessions.

9 Benefits of Body Wipes:

  • 1. Convenient
  • 2. Easy to Use
  • 3. Antibacterial
  • 4. Quick Freshen-Up
  • 5. When You Can’t Shower
  • 6. Hygienic Cleaning
  • 7. Exfoliating
  • 8. Wipes for Women
  • 9. Wipes for Men

Today, a multitude of wipes exist for almost every imaginable use and niche. Body cleansing wipes are available for removing makeup, showering, wiping away sweat, sanitizing, and hygienic cleaning. There are exfoliating wipes, wipes for camping, wipes for traveling, workout wipes, and wipes for many, many other uses. Body wipes provide us with many benefits and consumers have come to rely on them.

1. Body Wipes are Convenient

Convenience is without a doubt the primary reason why body wipes have become so popular. Since their introduction in the early 1960s, hundreds of body wipe products for a wide range of diverse uses have become available. You can find them at your local grocery store, drug store, and online. Fast-paced lifestyles resulting from the contemporary demands of home, job, family, and recreational pursuits keep us busy all day long. We all love body wet wipes because they save us time.

Carrying the equivalent of a quick shower in your pocket or purse is a big deal for men and women on the go. No matter the situation, the ability to pull out a wipe and freshen up is one of the benefits of the modern age. Here’s a partial list of the different kinds of cleansing body wipes that are readily available.

2. Body Wipes Are Easy to Use

Going hand-in-hand with the convenience of using body wipes is their ease of use. No instructions are needed. Simply remove a body wipe from its individual wrapper or box and use it. Then, the used wipe goes in the trash or is flushed away. No rinsing, washing, or reusing the wipe is necessary.

For the most part, the disposal of body wipes has minimal environmental impact. Some flushable wipes can wreak havoc on community sewer systems–especially body wipes that are not made of cellulose fibers. Wipes made from materials other than cellulose (paper) biodegrade too slowly and can clog sewer system pumps.

3. Body Wipes Can Be Antibacterial

You don’t have to suffer from germaphobia (fear of germs) to use antibacterial body wipes. Touching surfaces in public places that have been touched by hordes of other people is a great way to catch something. Wipes provide us with a quick way to protect ourselves.

A common scenario can be found at your favorite grocery store. You walk in and go straight to the long line of nested shopping carts. You look at the handle and see some unidentifiable something smeared across the handle. So many sickening possibilities! You don’t want to catch something, so you reach for an antibacterial wipe from the dispenser placed near the door. You pull one out, and thoroughly wipe the handle clean. Afterward, you proceed merrily on your way, confident that any offending bacteria have been safely neutralized.

It’s not just shopping cart handles. It’s doorknobs, restaurant table-tops, handrails, and the weight machines at your gym. And–horror of horrors–children, too. In fact, children can be the grimiest and most germ-laden carriers of all.

Just about every company producing hygiene products offers antibacterial body wipes, too. Most contain triclosan or triclocarban, ingredients that were originally used only in hospitals. Recently, triclosan has come under scrutiny of the FDA (Federal Drug Administration). Recent studies find that using body wipes or soaps that contain triclosan have the potential to create antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Additionally, triclosan-infused body wipes could disrupt your endocrine system. This effect, while not yet identified in humans, has been observed in multiple animal studies.

Many researchers now say that washing hands frequently with regular soap is just as effective as using an antibacterial wipe or antibacterial soap. But if soap and water are not available, an antibacterial body wipe may be just the thing you need in a pinch.

4. Body Wipes Are Great for a Quick Freshen-Up

Ever feel like you need to freshen-up after lunchtime run? Or when you’re on the road or between connecting flights? Perhaps you have a social event planned right after work. Anytime you need to freshen up but are short on time, personal body wipes can help you feel ready and rejuvenated.

A body cleansing wipe can clear away perspiration, dirt, and unpleasant odor, helping you feel refreshed and revitalized.

5. Wipes for When You Can’t Shower

You may be among those who can’t bear the thought of not taking a shower every day. But what about those times when showering is impossible? There will always be those times when taking a shower isn’t an option. It could be a camping trip, a long flight, an unexpected travel delay, or even an emergency situation. When it happens, having a supply of shower wipes or bath wipes can certainly brighten your day.

“Body shower” wipes have recently become quite popular among consumers. Some full-body shower wipes can even temporarily replace taking a shower. These wipes contain a mild cleaning solution, vitamin E, aloe vera, and they’re alcohol-free. They’re larger and thicker than typical body wipes, too–about the size of a standard washcloth but several times thicker.

Shower body wipes can remove sweat, body odor, and dirt. They also moisturize, dry quickly and leave no sticky residue. They’re safe for cleaning all areas of your body. Some have a medicinal smell that disappears quickly as the skin dries. Full body shower wipes are helpful for those who may be bedridden and unable to bathe.

As a real-world experiment, one man decided to see how long he could go without taking a shower, using only body cleansing wipes. After five consecutive days of using only shower body wipes, he felt reasonably clean and claims nobody knew he wasn’t taking a daily shower. He quit after the 5-day experiment because he began to develop redness and itching in his nether areas. The only other issue was the hair on his head. Shower wipes aren’t a substitute for shampoo.

6. Body Wipes for Hygienic Cleaning

Cleaning up “down there” has a long history– as long as humans have been roaming around planet earth. Before the advent of toilet paper, invented in the 19 century, we homo sapiens used dried leaves, clay, newspapers, and even Sears catalogs. Now, we have body cleansing wipes for use in the bathroom. What started out as a welcomed and convenient way to wipe baby bottoms has now grown into a billion-dollar business for adults, too.

However, there are differences of opinion among physicians as to the medical benefits of using body wipes as toilet paper. Some medical professionals say there’s no additional benefit compared to normal wiping with toilet paper, while others note that a sanitary wipe is more thorough. Most people would agree that using bathroom wipes just feels better.

Most leading brands of hygienic bathroom wipes are alcohol and paraben-free. They contain mild cleaning solutions and may contain aloe and vitamin E. Typically, these wipes are also fragrance-free. Because flushed wipes were known to clogging sewer systems, many wipes today are made with cellulose or plant-based fibers which biodegrade quickly.

7. Wipes for Exfoliating

Exfoliating wipes are different from facial cleaning wipes. While both are designed to clean the skin, exfoliating wipes are designed to remove dead skin cells, oil, dirt, and germs. The definition of exfoliate is “wash or rub with a granular substance to remove dead cells from the surface.” A good exfoliating wipe will unclog skin pores and allow your facial skin to breathe.

What exactly makes an exfoliating wipe different? The ingredients. Because exfoliating wipes are made to scrub and exfoliate, their texture will be rougher. Microbeads are the most common additive that gives exfoliating wipes the ability to remove dead skin without harming the living skin. Other ingredients may include oils, vitamins, glycerin, crushed oats, or wax beads.

8. Wipes for Women

Ladies, it’s easy to become dependent on body wipes for the face. It’s a great way to remove makeup. With hundreds of brands available in the makeup aisle or online, there’s something to meet the needs and wants of anyone wearing makeup. Yes, they’re easy to use, but here are some things you may not know about face wipes.

  • Do makeup wipes clean effectively? While quick and convenient, some dermatologists say that face wipes may not be the best way to remove makeup at the end of a long day. Instead of cleansing and removing makeup, wipes may just be pushing the dirt and makeup around your visage. They may be even lead to clogged pores. But when soap and water aren’t available or you have time constraints, makeup wipes will certainly do.
  • Wipes are different–so choose wisely. When shopping for facial wipes, remember there are differences. Some wipes are meant for removing eye makeup, while others are designed for deep cleaning. It’s important to carefully read the labels.
  • Great for the beach. Facial cleansing wipes are great for a day in the sun and sand. You can use them to remove old sunscreen and to refresh your skin.
  • Great for facial cleansing on the go. After a long plane, car or train ride, a facial cleansing wipe can help you feel reinvigorated. And, you won’t rile the TSA with a package of face wipes.
  • Effective for removing stains. Facial body wipes can even remove small stains from your clothing. Gently pat a face wipe on a newly acquired stain and the stain will likely disappear. Don’t wait. If the stain has been there too long, all the rubbing in the world with your face wipe won’t do any good.
  • Facial wipes are not a substitute for washing. While using a face wipe to remove makeup is quick and convenient, don’t get out of the habit of washing your face. A thorough and complete cleansing of the face still requires good ol’ soap (mild) and water.
  • Get rid of deodorant stains. Don’t you hate it when you’re applying deodorant and accidentally get some on your dark shirt or dress? When that happens, grab a face wipe and gently wipe the stain away. This should take care of any unwanted deodorant residue.
  • Clean up when dying hair. If you’re one who likes coloring your own hair, you know that when finished, there’s always dye on your forehead and neck. A face wipe will quickly and gently remove dye from your skin.

9. Wipes for Men

What wipes are formulated especially for men? Wipes for men contain fragrances and ingredients more suited to the masculine side. These face wipes are infused with an orange fragrance or other masculine-oriented colognes. They’re not made for removing makeup but will hydrate, refresh and soothe a man’s face.

Body Wipes – Frequently Asked Questions

Here are some frequently asked questions about body wipes:

You know where babies come from, but do you know where body wipes come from?

Body wipes may seem like a fairly novel for everyday life in America, but their origin dates back almost 60 years. It all started with something called the Wet-Nap.

Arthur Julius, an American inventor, is credited with creating the first disposable wipe made for cleaning. Julius worked in the cosmetics industry. In 1958, he trademarked the name “Wet-Nap” for a small sheet of paper-like material saturated with a soapy solution. He worked to perfect his new innovation and introduced Wet-Naps to the world in 1960, at the National Restaurant Show. Three years later, the famous Colonel Sanders started using Wet-Naps in his Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurants. Hungry customers used them to wipe away that “finger-lickin’-good” residue from their greasy fingers.

Other than a way to clean up after eating messy foods, wipes were used mainly for cleaning the bottoms of babies. Baby wipes are saturated with gentle cleaning solutions that don’t irritate the sensitive skin of infants. As technology improved and moistened wipes became more affordable, production of diaper wipes for babies boomed.

Do diaper wipes disinfect?

It may be surprising to learn that diaper wipes may be enough to clean dirty surfaces and eliminate a great number of germs. Baby wipes can kill some bacteria, especially those that come with that stuff that comes out of a baby’s bottom.

Can you use wet wipes as toilet paper?

A wet wipe may do a good job of cleaning your behind, but because they can contain alcohol or other cleaning agents not meant for “down there,” skin irritation may occur. Stick with flushable wipes for that job.

Is it okay not to shower after a workout?

Yes, you have our permission. Seriously, it’s not always possible to shower after a workout. When that’s the case, use one of the many no-shower body wipes that are available. They will clean and deodorize adequately until the next shower opportunity.

Do disinfecting wipes really work?

Disinfecting wipes are specifically formulated to kill germs on surfaces. The chemicals used in disinfecting wipes are not meant to be used on the body. They can cause skin irritation and trigger asthma and other allergies. Don’t use surface disinfecting wipes on your body.

Feel Cleaner with a Body Wipe

Life in the 21st century is fast-paced, hectic and demanding. The advent of body wipes for a multitude of uses helps you cope when time is scarce and you’re on the go. Shower wipes are great for when bathing or showering is not possible. Flushable wipes make it possible to clean your nether regions as never before. Antiperspirant wipes can solve an embarrassing problem with excessive sweating. Facial and exfoliating wipes can be indispensable for removing old makeup and caring for your face. What would your life be like without wipes?

groin sweat

Let’s face it, groin sweat can lead to some rather embarrassing moments. When your sweat is visible and makes you feel smelly, slimy and self-conscious– it isn’t just bad, it’s darn bad (and gross too). There’s nothing like a sweaty crotch to put a damper on your day. Here are some ways that can help:

10 Ways to Deal with Crotch Sweat

  • 1. Wear the Right Clothing
  • 2. Loose is Better Than Tight
  • 3. Sweat-Resistant Underwear
  • 4. Change Your Clothes
  • 5. Hygienic Trimming
  • 6. Powders and Creams
  • 7. Antiperspirants
  • 8. Body Wipes
  • 9. Botox Injections
  • 10. Last Resorts

There are more than a few causes of groin sweat. But, before we get into each of them, let’s take a quick look at the physiology of sweat.

What is Groin Sweat?

Everybody knows that sweat is the mechanism by which the body cools itself and maintains its core temperature. You probably also know that the underarms, crotch, hands, feet, and forehead are the places we sweat most and most often.

The reason that these areas of the body are more prone to excessive sweating than others is no mystery: It’s just a matter of numbers.

The average person has about 2 million sweat glands. Some people have as many as 4 million sweat glands. There are two kinds, eccrine and apocrine. Eccrine sweat glands are distributed just about everywhere on the body (ear canals, lips, and genitals are the exceptions.) The sweat they secrete is clear and mostly made up of water, salt, and electrolytes.

Apocrine glands are found in abundance in and around your armpits, scalp, eyelids, and nipples. They’re concentrated around areas where there are lots of hair follicles. This includes the groin region in both men and women. The sweat secreted by apocrine glands is different. It’s thick and yellow in color and much of it reaches the skin’s surface by way of hair canals. This type of sweat contains much higher concentrations of fatty acids and proteins.

Ladies: There are no sweat glands on the vagina, but there are very high numbers of apocrine sweat glands around the outside of the vagina on the labia majora.

When these fatty acids (lipids) and proteins arrive on the skin’s surface, millions of bacteria are waiting and eager to gorge themselves. As the bacteria break down lipids and proteins, smelly acids are left behind. This causes body odor and that terrible smell we know all too well.

What Causes Excessive Groin Sweating?

First of all, it’s not unusual to sweat between the legs, thighs, and in the groin area. Hot, muggy weather and physical exertion will cause you to sweat, especially down there. The sheer number of sweat glands in the groin can cause profuse sweating.

If hot temperatures or physical exertion are not the cause of your excessive groin sweat, something else may be at work. That something else is called hyperhidrosis. It’s a medical condition that affects an estimated 3% of the population.

There are two kinds of hyperhidrosis: generalized hyperhidrosis and primary focal hyperhidrosis. Generalized hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating over your entire body. It is usually caused by an unrelated underlying condition, like diabetes, cancer, or other disease or disorder.

The other type of hyperhidrosis–and the prime suspect for overactive sweat glands in the groin area–is called primary focal hyperhidrosis. It usually affects one specific area of the body, i.e. the underarms, face, head, hands, feet, or the groin.

Common Causes of Groin Sweat

So, why does your crotch sweat so much? Here are several likely causes:

High Temperature

Even minimal moving around in hot environments will cause you to sweat in the groin area.

Exercise

Any form of vigorous exercise will cause you to sweat in the crotch (and other places). Exercise that’s focused on the lower body will produce more sweat in and around your groin.

Pubic Hair

Because apocrine glands are found in and around the groin, pubic hair traps bacteria and moisture from sweat, creating a virtual greenhouse for bacterial growth. The rapid surge in bacterial population causes itching, discomfort and groin sweat odor. If proper cleansing does not take place, the buildup of sweat and bacteria can lead to groin sweat rash, thigh chafing, and infection.

Bad Underwear

There is good underwear, and then there’s bad underwear. We’re not talking about your Batman briefs. We’re talking about underwear that’s made of synthetic fabrics that don’t breathe. These types of undies don’t wick away moisture and they trap sweat and heat in the groin area. Always choose underwear made from natural, breathable fabrics that can absorb and wick away moisture and allow ventilation. Natural fabrics are also non-allergenic and less likely to cause a rash.

Obesity

You knew it was coming. Yes, if you’re overweight, the chances of excessive groin sweat are much higher. The body is naturally insulated by fat. Excess fat in and around the hips, stomach, and thighs will cause excessive groin sweating.

Feminine Hygiene Products

May panty liners and pads are made of materials that don’t breathe. Wearing them may increase the temperature resulting in increased vaginal sweating. If you must wear pads and panty liners, try changing them at frequent intervals.

Lack of General Hygiene

This probably goes without saying: Good hygiene is critical. Clean your groin area every day, either by bathing, taking a shower, or using a cleansing wipe. To win the battle of groin sweat, you have to start out right–and that means starting out clean.

Hyperhidrosis

Uncontrolled and excessive groin sweat may be a sign of hyperhidrosis. Generalized hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating all over the entire body. Primary focal hyperhidrosis is sweating in one particular part of the body. If you’re experiencing excessive and profuse sweating only in the pubic area, you might be suffering from primary focal hyperhidrosis. A qualified doctor can make that diagnosis.

Menopause

The changing hormone levels in women over the age of 45 often cause hot flashes, which can lead to heavy perspiration–even in the crotch region. Night sweats are also commonly associated with menopause.

Anxiety or Stress

If you’re sweating a lot, it may be due to anxiety and stress.

Diabetes

Diabetes can cause glucose levels to swing wildly, which in turn can cause excessive sweating in both men and women.

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism is caused by an overactive thyroid gland. Other symptoms include weight loss, elevated heart rate, nervousness, and fatigue.

Got Groin Sweat? 10 Ways to Deal with and Stop Crotch Sweat.

Here are the best ways to prevent and control unwanted sweating in your crotch:

1. Wear the Right Clothing

One simple yet effective way to stop sweating and prevent that heat-related groin rash is to wear the right clothing. Synthetic fabrics like rayon and polyester are tightly woven and don’t allow adequate ventilation. While they can wick away moisture, they will retain groin sweat odors. Use caution when choosing clothes made from these fabrics. Some synthetic blends are breathable and are moisture wicking, too.

Clothing made from natural fabrics, like cotton, linen, and wool, are breathing fabrics which allow air to reach the skin. These fabrics (except cotton) also will wick away perspiration, allowing it to evaporate. Cotton, while super absorbent, holds on to moisture longer than other natural materials–and even other synthetic fibers. Silk is also a natural fiber but is not moisture wicking. Silk hangs on to odor, requires special care, and is fragile.

2. Loose is Better Than Tight

Skinny jeans and tight leggings are all the rage. You may love them, but they won’t love you back. Pants that are tight in the crotch area are going to spike the thermometer down there. If you’re wearing skin-tight clothing, fabric will rub against your skin. Friction creates heat. Then heat and friction are going to gang up on you, making you sweat. The sweat will make you feel uncomfortable, and when bacteria are added to the equation, the result can be offensive sweat odor along with the potential for a burning groin sweat rash.

Instead, to minimize heat and moisture, you should opt for loose-fitting pants. Looser pants will provide plenty of room for movement without creating friction. Less friction means less heat, and less heat means less crotch sweat. Loose joggers are great for casual days. For other, less casual situations, choose something comfortable that won’t rub you the wrong way.

3. Sweat-Resistant Underwear

When it comes to underwear, it’s best to choose function over fashion. Sweat-friendly fabrics are especially important when choosing what to wear underneath it all.

Many manufacturers within the athletic apparel industry have developed special fabrics that do a great job of wicking away moisture so it can evaporate. If sweat is allowed to evaporate quickly, bacteria won’t be able to breed and multiply.

These new, space-age fabrics are capable of not only of moisture-wicking, but they can even help regulate temperature, neutralize odor, and fight bacteria. Bamboo underwear, for example, is rapidly growing in popularity. Underwear made from bamboo is soft and moisture-wicking. Additionally, it can help regulate temperature and kill bacteria. Sweat-proof underwear that will help prevent groin sweat is available for both men and women.

4. Change Your Clothes

It may be obvious, but another simple way to control the problem of sweat glands on the rampage is to change your clothing after experiencing a crotch-sweating episode. This is more easily done when at home or after a workout at the gym, but what about other situations? Yes, it could get awkward and may not be an option at times.

You’ll want to do this for a couple of reasons:

First, yeast is a fungus that loves moist, warm climates, like the one between your legs. Spending too much time in sweaty underwear can lead to an opportunistic yeast infection that includes vaginal itching and burning. Unfortunately, yeast infections can be difficult to treat.

Second, if you continue to function in sweat-soaked underwear, you’re going to feel terribly uncomfortable. And when the unpleasant odor becomes noticeable to you and others, you’ll wish you had a spare pair of underwear in your purse or bag.

5. Hygienic Trimming

Ever wonder why we have so much pubic hair? It’s bad enough that we have so many sweat glands in the crotch area. Pubic hair does have a purpose and function: It can act as a friction reducer from our clothing and also works to wick away groin sweat.

But hair traps bacteria on your skin. In genital areas, that can be both good and bad. The good kind of vaginal bacteria helps to prevent yeast from overgrowing. But when groin sweat mixes with bacteria, oil, and pubic hair, there will be unwanted and unpleasant smells.

If you have excessive sweating in the vaginal area, you can reduce the chances of problems with an occasional trim. Be careful, though! You don’t want to nick or cut the skin while trimming. Specialized electric trimmers are available for this task. Also, grooming scissors for pets which have rounded tips can do the job, too.

6. Powders and Creams

Starting your day by dabbing on a moisture-absorbing powder may be the solution for you. If so, you’ll be able to make it through the day without accumulating problematic amounts of groin sweat–along with the accompanying smell and discomfort.

When it comes to powders, there are three popular choices: baby powder, talcum powder or a starch-based powder like corn starch. Many doctors recommend talcum powder, as it tends to be more effective than corn starch products against crotch-area sweat. Powders enriched with antifungal agents are also available. If using baby powder, be careful not to apply inside the vagina. Researchers have uncovered a potential association between baby powder and ovarian cancer if baby powder gets into the body.

Absorbent powders and body powder lotions can also be a good way to reduce “swamp crotch.” Chafing, sticking, and a vinegar-like odor often plagues men with excessive groin sweating. There are dozens of products specifically formulated to control sweating in the nether region and help prevent a rash from groin sweat.

Creams for application in the groin area are intended to treat irritation and rash that result from groin sweat. Jock itch (tinea cruris, aka crotch rot) is a fungal infection that primarily afflicts men, though women can get it, too. Jock itch causes a rash, pain, and itching in and on the groin folds. It’s easily treated with antifungal creams and it can even clear up on its own if the crotch area is kept clean and dry.

7. Antiperspirants

Antiperspirants are not the same as deodorants. Deodorants are fragrance products that mask or neutralize body odor. Antiperspirants, on the other hand, stop sweat before it gets to the surface of the skin.

All antiperspirants contain an aluminum salt compound–usually aluminum chloride. When aluminum chloride comes into contact with moisture (your groin sweat), it forms a gel-like plug that blocks sweat glands from secreting sweat. It’s been used for this purpose for nearly 90 years. The plugs are temporary and will dissipate over time, requiring reapplication to extend perspiration protection.

Should you use a deodorant or an antiperspirant in your groin area? The answer is yes–but be careful.

The skin on your private parts is more sensitive than your armpits or other areas that are subject to a lot of sweating. You don’t want to use a product down there that may irritate your skin and lead to even more serious problems.

A deodorant may help with groin sweat odor, but it won’t do anything to prevent moisture, bacteria growth and possible crotch rash. A deodorant can only partially help solve your groin sweat problems.

Many dermatologists and the International Hyperhidrosis society suggest using an antiperspirant to stop groin sweat, especially if you’ve been diagnosed with primary focal hyperhidrosis.

According to the International Hyperhidrosis Society:

“Antiperspirants are considered the first line of treatment for excessive sweating and can be used nearly anywhere on the body where sweating is a problem. That’s right, antiperspirants are not just for your underarms – you can use them on your hands, feet, face, back, chest, and even groin.”

Check with your doctor if you have concerns about using an antiperspirant in and around your groin–or if you experience irritation, swelling or pain when using an antiperspirant to stop crotch sweat.

8. Body Wipes

A quick, easy and convenient way to temporarily deal with groin sweat is to use body wipes. They are available in single-use packages or in travel versions that can be carried in your purse or pocket.

Flushable (bathroom) wipes are great for this. Most are formulated with vitamin E and aloe, are pH balanced, and they are gentle on the skin. Don’t use wipes with alcohol or antibacterial wipes, as they can kill good vaginal bacteria.

And guys, there are even wipes specially formulated for you and your anatomical differences. Whether its male groin sweat or female groin sweat, there’s a body wipe for you that can help you deal with groin sweat and feel fresh.

9. Botox Injections

Botox injections have been FDA approved for the treatment of excessive sweating of the underarms (axillary sweating) and have become a widely-accepted practice. An increasing number of doctors–particularly dermatologists–are now using Botox to treat profuse sweating of the feet, face, and head.

Today, dermatologists are taking the lead, using Botox to treat other localized areas–including the groin, under the breasts, and on the chest and back. While considered “off label” or “not as intended,” Botox injections in the groin have been successful for many patients.

Botox works by interrupting the signals that your nervous system sends to activate your sweat glands. The beneficial effect usually lasts 3-6 months and must eventually be repeated. When done correctly, there is no negative effect on sexual function.

10. Last Resorts

If your problems with groin sweat are so severe that none of these remedies and treatments are effective, there are other approaches you might want to consider.

Anticholinergics

These drugs are usually taken orally (by mouth). Anticholinergics act by preventing the nervous system from communicating with sweat glands, which stops the sweat glands from activating. Potentially serious side effects can be experienced with these drugs, and they must be prescribed by a qualified physician.

Sweat Gland Removal

As a last and final treatment, doctors can surgically remove sweat glands. This procedure is not reversible and can cause compensatory sweating in other parts of the body.

All Your Sweaty Groin Questions Answered

Groin sweating can be head scratching. Why it’s happening, how it’s happening and what can you do fix it? For your convenience we’ve organized a list of additional groin faqs to help you get to the bottom of your sweat down under.

When should I see a doctor about my groin sweating?

If lifestyle changes, good personal hygiene, and other non-prescriptive treatments aren’t working for you, consult with your doctor.

Can I put deodorant between my legs?

You can, but it won’t do anything more than mask bad groin sweat odor. Ladies, be sure to avoid getting any inside the vagina.

Can I use an antiperspirant on my groin?

According to the International Hyperhidrosis Society and a growing number of dermatologists, the answer is yes. Remember that your skin in the groin area is more sensitive than other areas. Discontinue if you experience discomfort, redness, or swelling. For women: Be careful not to put any inside the vagina. There are no sweat glands there, anyway.

Can excessive sweating be cured?

If excessive sweating is due to an unrelated disorder or disease (generalized hyperhidrosis), successfully treating that condition usually stops the sweating. Otherwise, excessive sweating can only be successfully managed and treated.

Why does my groin sweat smell so bad?

Sweat in the groin area is different than the sweat we experience elsewhere on the body because groin sweat is secreted by apocrine sweat glands. Groin sweat contains fatty acids and proteins which feed bacteria. As the bacteria break down the nutrients in groin sweat, foul-smelling acids are left behind. Additionally, pubic hair traps heat and sweat, creating the perfect breeding environment for bacteria and more bad smells.

Why does my groin sweat at night?

If you’re experiencing night sweats in the groin area, it could be primary focal hyperhidrosis. Other causes could be diabetes or low blood sugar. Women may be having night sweats due to changing hormone levels brought on by menopause.

Dealing with Groin Sweat

Everyone can experience groin sweat. Often, excessive sweating in the crotch area causes an embarrassing, unsightly appearance and offensive odor. Preventative treatments and remedies range from inexpensive and non-invasive to expensive medical procedures. It’s best to start with simple remedies, then work your way down the list until you find a solution that works for you.

If you’re sweating excessively in the groin region, it may be due to any one of a number of causes. Fortunately for all of us, there are ways to curtail, manage and even eliminate crotch sweating and the accompanying and physical and social implications. One or more of these treatments will likely work for you, and your problems with groin sweat will dry up and disappear.

Stinkaphobia. It’s that pervasive fear of taking your shoes off in public. You know what will happen. It’s happened before. Waves of noxious foot odor will begin radiating from your sweaty smelly feet, gradually filling the room with suffocating odor and offending the noses of everyone within sniffing distance. It’s time to put an end to stinky feet! Here are 12 effective ways to battle foot odor:

12 Way to Get Rid of Stinky Feet

  • 1. Wash Your Feet Often
  • 2. Exfoliate
  • 3. Keep Your Feet Dry
  • 4. Choose Your Socks Wisely
  • 5. Wear the Right Shoes and Rotate Them
  • 6. Odor-Fighting Insoles
  • 7. Shoe Deodorizers
  • 8. Soak Your Smelly Feet
  • 9. Foot Sprays and Powders
  • 10. Is It Something You Ate?
  • 11. Treat Athlete’s Foot or Foot Fungus
  • 12. Try an Antiperspirant

If you have a fear of taking your shoes off in any kind of public setting, you’re not alone. Whether it’s a long airplane ride, trying on a new pair of shoes, entering a home where wearing shoes inside is taboo, or any of countless other possible shoeless situation, your stinky feet will embarrass you.

A Few Smelly Feet Facts

Your feet, especially the soles, are home to the highest concentration of sweat glands anywhere on your body. As many as 250,000 eccrine sweat glands are in each of your feet. The sweat glands in your feet can produce up to a pint of sweat every 24 hours.

Believe it or not, foot sweat is normally odorless. But when it comes in contact with the abundance of hungry bacteria hanging out on your skin, that’s when the trouble begins. The small amount of nutrients contained in foot sweat, along with dead skin cells, provide a feast for skin bacteria and fungi. The more we sweat, the more there is for bacteria to eat. The more they eat, the more we stink. This break-down of sweat and the rapid growth of bacteria are responsible for the bad foot odor we all dread. If you’re on your feet most of the day, the likelihood of stinky feet is dramatically increased.

We are all subject to sweaty, smelly feet, regardless of the temperature or season of the year. Teenagers and pregnant women are more likely to suffer from stinky feet because of the hormonal changes taking place in their bodies.

Foot odor is normal and doesn’t necessarily mean there’s an underlying health problem–although a health issue is certainly possible. One such serious sweating disorder is called hyperhidrosis. It’s a medical condition that affects about 15 million people in the USA. Those who suffer from hyperhidrosis sweat excessively and for no apparent reason. Excessive foot sweating is known as Plantar hyperhidrosis.

Common fungal infections, like athlete’s foot, produce dry flaky bits of skin that bacteria feed on. The resulting bacteria bloom and grow on your feet, augmenting the smelly feet problem. The “sweat + bacteria = stinky feet problem” is made worse when your feet are hermetically sealed in shoes and socks that prevent any ventilation. Then, when you finally take off your shoes… well, you know it’s going to be bad news for every nose in the room.

Why Do I Have Stinky Feet?

Before we get to talking about how to get rid of sweaty, stinky feet, let’s look at the common causes.

Shoes Made of Synthetic Materials

If you wear shoes made of plastic, vinyl, or other materials that do not “breathe,” you’re essentially guaranteeing that your feet will stink. These kinds of shoes trap sweat and provide the perfect habitat for growing the pesky bacteria that make your feet smell so bad.

Old Shoes and Shoes Worn Too Long

Remember that old pair of shoes that smells so bad? In time, dead skin and bacteria begin to linger longer in your shoes. Every time you slide your feet in them again, the bacteria begin to party. And, if you wear the same shoes day in and day out, they’re going to quickly become “those smelly shoes.”

Socks: Dirty or Not, Here I Come!

Let’s start with the gross part. Dirty socks are going to be one of the most frequent causes of stinky feet. If you wear a pair of socks for more than one day before washing, the buildup of bacteria is going to be banana-town-crazy. And, if you wear clean socks that don’t breathe, sweat will be trapped and you’ll end up with stinky socks, shoes, and feet. If the water you wash your socks in is not hot enough, the bacteria will not get killed off and you’ll be starting each new day with a serious foot odor disadvantage. Do your feet smell like what the circus left behind?

Fungal Infections and More

Fungus that attacks the feet, including athlete’s foot (tinea pedis) and nail fungus, will lead to stinky feet. Itching, cracking, redness, and scaling–especially between the toes–are common symptoms of foot fungus.

Another, more serious infection is trench foot. It’s caused by extended exposure to wet, cold and unsanitary conditions. It got its name from World War I soldiers who spent weeks and months in dirty, wet trenches. The bad foot odor is caused by decay as blood supply to the feet deteriorates and tissue begins to die.

Stress and Anxiety

Stress and anxiety can increase the amount of sweating you experience. And since the highest concentration of sweat glands is on your feet, you know what will happen in stressful situations.

Plantar Hyperhidrosis

Plantar hyperhidrosis is one of the four main types of primary focal hyperhidrosis. If you suffer from plantar hyperhidrosis, even the best foot hygiene won’t be enough to help.

Hormones

If you wonder why your feet smell, hormones may be the answer. There’s nobody that scores quite so high on the stinky feet scale as kids and teenagers. Some pregnant women may come close. The cause? Changing hormones.

12 Tips to Prevent Stinky Feet

Fortunately for all of us, there is a stinky-feet remedy for every circumstance. Here are 12 ways you can get rid of that smelly foot odor:

1. Wash Your Feet Often

Mom told you to wash your feet thoroughly, and she was right. Don’t just casually let the suds from your shower wash over your feet. You’ve got to exercise some tough love on them. Wash your feet with an antibacterial soap that will kill the bacteria. Use a washcloth or body scrubber to really get at them, and don’t forget to scrub between the toes–bacteria often find refuge there. If you don’t shower every day, make it a habit to wash your feet. Starting with clean feet will delay and minimize the inevitable onset of bacteria and chain reaction with sweat feet.

2. Exfoliate

Exfoliation is a technique used to remove and get rid of dead skin cells. Remember, a dead skin cell is the breakfast of champions for bacteria. If you don’t remove dead skin cells, they will build up providing an all-you-can-eat buffet for the mean, little critters. Exfoliation will remove those dead skin cells and reinvigorate your feet. Use a natural bristle brush or loofah to exfoliate twice a week. Here’s something to remember: A fibrous loofah or bristled brush is the perfect hangout for bacteria. Make sure you clean them with antibacterial soap after each use.

3. Keep Your Feet Dry

One of the easiest ways to fix stinky feet is to keep them dry. After showering, bathing, or a soaking your feet, dry off completely with a clean towel. Take a few extra seconds and dry thoroughly between your toes. The drier your feet, the less worry you’ll have about foot odor.

4. Choose Your Socks Wisely

Your choice of socks will go a long way to helping you get rid of smelly feet. Wouldn’t it be great if wearing the right socks was the best remedy for stinky feet? Well, it might just be. Take a look in your sock drawer. Push aside the orphans and mismatches and look at their material. Cotton socks are popular, but they are NOT a good choice for controlling sweaty and stinky feet. Sweat absorbed by cotton fiber does not evaporate. Sweat, bacteria, and foot odor will lurk in those cotton socks until they’re washed again. The best socks for stinky feet include:

Merino Wool: Merino wool is able to absorb up to 30% of its weight in moisture without feeling damp. It’s light, soft, will help reduce foot odor, and won’t trap moisture next to your feet.
Coolmax: Dupont invented Coolmax in the 1980s. It’s a polyester based fiber that wicks away moisture from your skin. It’s often combined with other fabrics.
Olefin: In 1963, Italian scientists won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for Olefin. It’s strong, lightweight, dries quickly. Olefin also resists soil and stains, and wicks away moisture up to 25 times faster than other synthetic materials.

5. Wear the Right Shoes and Rotate Them

Just like choosing the right socks, it’s crucial that you wear the right shoes. If you’re wondering what to do about your smelly feet, avoiding stench-promoting shoes will go a long way. Stay away from shoes made from artificial materials like plastic or vinyl. Always choose footwear made from leather, canvas, or other natural materials that breathe. If weather permits, consider wearing open-toe sandals. Keep your shoes dry and rotate your footwear every day. Shoes should be allowed to rest for at least 24 hours before wearing them again.

6. Odor-Fighting Insoles

Among the products for curing stinky feet, some of the most popular foot care products are removable insoles that fight foot odor. They work to deodorize your shoes. Most of them are made from activated charcoal. Activated charcoal, unlike the traditional type, expands and forms pockets that absorb sweat moisture and odor. They can absorb foot sweat throughout your day (or night). The activated charcoal ingredient not only absorbs the odor but also neutralizes it. Activated charcoal insoles must be replaced every 60 days or so as their ability to absorb moisture and odor dissipates over time.

7. Shoe Deodorizers

If you’re still having trouble battling the stinky odor lingering in your footwear, you may want to try deodorizing your shoes. There are several methods that produce good results:

  • Wash Them: If the shoes are washable, throw them in the washing machine or wash them by hand. Use a mild detergent. You could also add some white vinegar to kill bacteria.
  • Use a Homemade Shoe Powder: You can make your own deodorizing powder with baking soda, cornstarch, and tea tree oil. Combine 3 tablespoons of baking soda, 1 tablespoon of corn starch and 5 drops of tea tree essential oil. Sprinkle the mixture into each shoe and let them stand overnight. Repeat as necessary.
  • Stuff Them: Stuff your shoes with newspaper, cedar wood chips or cedar shoe trees. Unwanted moisture will be absorbed, and the cedar will leave your shoes with a pleasant scent.
  • Use a Shoe Deodorizing Spray: Another way to get rid of shoe odor is to use a commercial deodorizing spray. They’re widely available and can kill odor-causing bacteria and rid your shoes of disgusting foot odor.
  • Freeze Them:Yup, stick those smelly old dogs in the freezer overnight. The freezing temperature can kill odor-causing bacteria. You’ll want to put them in a plastic bag to isolate them from that container of Chunky Monkey ice cream you’ve been thinking about.

8. Soak Your Stinky Feet

Soaking your feet can help cure stinky feet. They may also prove helpful as an effective home remedy for athlete’s foot. There are several different ways to soak your stinky feet. Here are the most popular methods:

  • Epsom Salt Foot Soak: Epsom salt draws moisture out of your feet. Less moisture means less bacteria. Dissolve half a cup of Epsom salt in a large bowl or tub of warm water and soak for 10 to 20 minutes.
  • Vinegar Foot Soak: Vinegar also makes your feet uninviting for bacteria. Mix 2 parts warm water with 1 part vinegar. Soak your feet for 15 to 20 minutes. Caution: If you have scratches or open sores, don’t use this soak.
  • Essential Oil Foot Soak: Some essential oils have antifungal and antibacterial properties. Fill a large bowl or small tub with hot water (not scalding hot). Combine with a half cup of Epsom salt, 10 drops of tea tree oil and 10 drops of eucalyptus oil. You may also add 1/4 cup of lemon oil or apple cider vinegar. Soak for 15 minutes.
  • Mouthwash Foot Soak: Mouthwash products contain active ingredients that can kill fungus. This home remedy treatment is not so much for foot odor itself, but for killing fungus that’s causing the foot odor. Fill a plastic tub with 1 part mouthwash and 2 parts of warm water. You may add some white vinegar too. Soak your feet for 45 to 60 minutes. It’s recommended that this soak is repeated every day until the fungal infection disappears.

9. Foot Sprays and Powders

Another way of going after stinky shoes and feet is with a foot spray or powder. There are foot sprays for shoes that kill bacteria and deodorize. You can also spray rubbing alcohol inside your shoes. Some sprays are designed to be applied directly on the feet. The highest reviewed are made of 100% natural ingredients including lavender, chamomile, ginger, cocoa, and rooibos tea. They kill bacteria and also soothe the skin. Also, you can try a foot powder made from corn starch, baby powder, or baking soda. These household powders absorb moisture and can help keep feet dry. Some will even make your feet smell good.

10. Is It Something You Ate?

Many types of food can help or hinder your efforts to get rid of stinky feet. Here’s some foods you should avoid…

Caffeinated drinks and hot peppers: These are known to increase body temperature and encourage more sweating.
Processed and refined carbohydrates: Sadly, pasta, bread, baked goods, and white rice can promote stinky feet.
Foods that contain lots of sulfur: Onions, broccoli, cabbage, garlic, and onions can cause stinky foot odor as they’re broken down by your digestive system.
High protein foods: Eggs, red meat, and fish are foods high in choline and carnitine. When these compounds are digested, they can cause foul-smelling fish-like odors.
Foods to Eat

Foods rich in chlorophyll: Leafy greens and sea vegetation (kelp and seaweed) can help rid the body of stinky-feet compounds.
Herbs can serve as a cleansing agent.

Foods with lots of zinc can help reduce body odors, including foot odor. Among the foods high in zinc are peanuts, pumpkin seeds, and–yes, it’s true–dark chocolate (ideally no more than 1 ounce per day).

11. Treat Athlete’s Foot or Foot Fungus

Chances are you’ve had athlete’s foot. It’s that itchy, burning, painful condition caused by a fungus that loves warm, moist feet. Rash, scaly, and cracked skin are the tell-tale symptoms. Adding insult to injury, athlete’s foot also causes your feet to stink. Fortunately, athlete’s foot will clear within one to two weeks with proper treatment. Here are a few ways to treat and prevent athlete’s foot:

Keep your feet clean and dry. Go barefoot when you can. Change socks a couple of times a day, and wear shoes and socks that breathe.

Use an antifungal cream, spray or powder. Well-known brands include Lotrimin, Tinactin, and Micatin. All are widely available and don’t require a prescription.

Avoid going barefoot in public places like swimming pools, locker rooms, showers, etc. Wear sandals or flip-flops to prevent infection.

12. Try an Antiperspirant

An antiperspirant for feet? Yes. While we think of antiperspirants to control underarm sweat and body odor, they’re not just for your underarms. According to the International Hyperhidrosis Society, “Antiperspirants are considered the first line of treatment for excessive sweating and can be used nearly anywhere on the body where sweating is a problem.”

If you experience excessive sweating on your feet and the smelly feet problem that comes along for the ride, a prescription strength antiperspirant may be exactly what you need. If you’ve been diagnosed with plantar hyperhidrosis, you definitely want to try one. Antiperspirant products for controlling excessive foot sweat contain the same active ingredient, aluminum chloride, found in other antiperspirants.

One application of a prescription strength antiperspirant on your sweaty feet can last for several days. Foot antiperspirants are available as a spray, towelettes or a cream. Once the foot sweating is controlled with a good foot antiperspirant, the stinky feet problem will be significantly reduced.

How Do I Prevent Foot Odor?

“An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” as the old saying goes. It’s particularly true when it comes to preventing stinky feet. Preventing foot odor before it happens is the best way to treat smelly feet.

Remember to follow these tips to keep your feet smelling nice and clean:

  • Wash your feet often. Good personal hygiene is always a great idea.
  • Scrub your feet. Exfoliation will remove dead skin and bacteria.
  • Keep your feet dry. Dry thoroughly after bathing or showering and, if possible, air your feet out throughout the day. Dryness kills sweaty, stinky feet.
  • Wear socks that breathe. Consider specialty sports socks which can wick away moisture. Stay away from heavy socks and even cotton socks if foot perspiration is a problem.
  • Wear the right shoes. Always choose shoes that are made of natural materials that breathe. Rotate your shoes. If possible, don’t wear the same pair on consecutive days.
  • Use odor-fighting insoles infused with active charcoal. They’ll absorb moisture and neutralize stinky shoe odor.
  • Deodorize your shoes often. Wash them if they’re washable. Use a powder or spray deodorizer to sanitize and kill smelly feet odor.
  • Soaking your feet with Epsom salt, essential oils, antibacterial mouthwash or vinegar can kill odor-causing bacteria.
  • Stay away from caffeinated beverages and spicy foods. Eat foods with chlorophyll, herbs, and zinc.
  • Promptly treat athlete’s foot or other infections. They all cause your feet to smell bad.
  • If you have plantar hyperhidrosis (or your feet just sweat a lot), use a prescription strength antiperspirant wipe or cream.

We are all vulnerable to stinky feet. It’s a universal problem. Understanding the causes of foot odor and knowing how to get rid of smelly feet can greatly improve your quality of life. Your social interactions will become much more pleasant, and your confidence and self-esteem will skyrocket. The next time you need to remove your shoes, you’ll be able to smile without worrying about stinky feet.

Guys, do you struggle with a hot, smelly groin? This topic might be uncomfortable (no pun intended), but it’s important. You’re looking for some serious and effective answers to help you out of a sticky situation. So here it is: Let’s talk about the super annoying, super awkward problem of stinky, sweaty balls.

7 Ways to Get Rid of Stinky, Sweaty Balls

  • 1. Develop Good Grooming Habits
  • 2. Carefully Manscape
  • 3. Use Powder
  • 4. Wear Breathable Clothing/Underwear
  • 5. Try a Deodorizing Cream
  • 6. Cut Down on Chafing
  • 7. Carry Wipes or a Spray

All guys have to deal with it–no matter your age, activity level, or body chemistry–particularly during hot and humid summer months. Having sweating balls is the worst feeling ever. Plus, sitting in a pool of your own ball sweat can lead to nasty odor, painful itching and even infections like jock itch.

Fortunately, stinky ball sweat is easily treatable. There are plenty of steps you can take to cut down on the sweat and embarrassing odor associated with a solid case of swamp crotch.

What Causes Ball Sweat (And Odor)?

In general, there are many environmental and body-chemistry factors that contribute to excessive sweating. Or, you may have overactive sweat glands, a condition known as hyperhidrosis. Read on for a few likely suspects that could be contributing to your case of swamp crotch.

Heat and Humidity

Heat makes us sweat. Seems like a no-brainer, right? Whether you’re living in the tropics or stuck in an office with the heat cranked too high, when your body temperature rises, you start to sweat. And your balls can get extra sweaty since they live in a dark and warm environment. Keep in mind that sweating is your body’s natural air conditioning system, designed to cool your body temperature. While it’s great that sweat keeps us cool, there’s no denying it causes some unpleasant side effects.

Sweat is usually fine when it has a chance to dry on the surface of our skin. The problem is, our balls don’t usually get a chance to fly free in the breeze. If you try it in most places, you’ll probably get arrested. It’s highly doubtful that the sweat pooling in your crotch has a chance to dry properly. Instead, it hangs out down there, keeping your groin area full of moisture and forming the perfect habitat for odor-causing bacteria and fungi.

Wearing the Wrong Clothes

Wearing the wrong clothes can end up trapping unwanted moisture around your sack. If you know the day could become warm, one of your best options is to dress in layers. This allows you to remove clothing as needed to help lower your overall body temperature. This will help you sweat less and keep your gonads dry.

Diet

Believe it or not, a diet high in processed foods and trans fats can lead to higher levels of sweat in general, including excessive ball sweat. In addition, some foods, like certain fish, can cause odors when secreted through your sweat glands. Furthermore, many cruciferous vegetables, like broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage, along with garlic and onions, can also release a sulfur smell when secreted through sweat glands.

If you notice extra sweaty or smelly balls after eating these foods, you can cut down on the odor by making sure you eat them only when fully cooked. Interestingly, the after-effects are much diminished through the cooking process.

Heavy Workouts

Whether it’s CrossFit, trail running, or cross-country biking, intense exercise can lead to a sweaty, swampy crotch. It makes sense, right? If you’re breaking a sweat everywhere else, the amount of sweat downstairs is usually significant, too. The harder you work out, the more you sweat. The more you sweat, the stinker your balls become.

Skin Folds

There’s no denying the truth. Our saggy, wrinkly balls make a prime environment for bacteria and yeast to grow. As skin folds rub together, they slough off dead skin cells, which can help both yeast and odor-causing bacteria to thrive. Let’s face it–there’s a lot of loose skin flopping around down there, so even the slightest rise in temperature can turn your pubic area into a sweaty, smelly mess.

Concentration of Sweat Glands

You have two types of sweat glands that densely populate the groin area – eccrine and apocrine glands. Both produce sweat, and the apocrine gland goes a step farther to add a musky scent. When the smell and sweat combine with the yeast and bacteria that often grow in this area, it’s a perfect recipe for stinky, swampy balls.

get rid of sweaty balls

7 Ways to Get Rid of Stinky, Sweaty Balls

A lot of these steps seem like good, old-fashioned common sense – but there are some nuances you may find helpful. It’s important to know what to do when your old friend swamp crotch comes to visit. If you sweat at all, and most of us do, you’re likely at some point to be a victim of stinky, sweaty balls. Below are some remedies to help you prevent and minimize the embarrassment and discomfort that comes from having smelly balls.

1. Develop Good Grooming Habits

Guys, this should go without saying, but we need to shower. Every day. Maybe multiple times a day, depending on the ambient temperature and your activity level. The reality is that when sweat sits on your skin for an extended period of time and has a chance to mix it up with the bacteria that live on the surface of your skin, you’re in for a pretty nasty time.

Showering regularly and washing your manparts can go a long way toward minimizing the embarrassing odor that often accompanies sweaty balls. Keep in mind that bacteria thrive in a warm, moist environment, so the longer you let your testicles wallow in sweat, the more bacteria have a chance to develop and grow.

A morning shower goes a long way toward resetting the bacteria button every day, but simply rinsing your sweaty balls with water isn’t good enough. Look for products specifically designed for your private parts that can kill bacteria, moisturize, and knock out odors. You can even find products that can help soften body hair in the groin area, which helps prevent chafing (your balls will be delighted).

At the very least, use regular soap down there–both bar soap and liquid versions will get the job done. But try to use unscented, gentle products and make sure you rinse well. The skin folds of the scrotum can trap fragrances and chemicals from shower products, which can lead to irritation later in the day. And if you switch over to cool water at the very end of your shower, you can help cut down on the chance that you’re sweating when you get out of the shower.

When toweling off, dry your groin carefully. Some experts even recommend blowing air on your testicles using a hair dryer on a cool setting. This can help remove any moisture you missed while toweling off. If you don’t want to use a hair dryer and have time, you can also simply wait a few minutes before getting dressed to allow your pubic area time to air-dry completely.

2. Carefully Manscape

Many of you won’t like the sound of this, but carefully maintaining and grooming the pubic area can go a long way toward fighting the discomfort, and especially odor, associated with sweaty balls. Pubic hair can become a solid breeding ground for bacteria and fungi, trapping them and seriously compounding the problem. You must trim. Some men prefer to remove all the hair down there, but it’s not always necessary.

You’ll want to pay attention to the entire groin area and its associated body hair–including the area in front of the balls, the balls themselves, and even the inner thigh area and the area above the penis.

A good manscape session includes essential trimming, so find a good, reliable cordless electric trimmer specifically designed for grooming your groin area. Don’t try to skimp and use a facial hair trimmer down there– trust me, it won’t go well. You need one that’s designed with a powerful motor and ergonomic design specially to tackle the genital area. Use the included adjustable guard to help ensure there are no dangerous nicks or scrapes along the way.

Once you’ve done everything you can with your electric trimmer, you can also go one step farther by refining the balls with a safety razor made especially for this job. This elevates both softness and smoothness–and, unlike a pair of hairy balls, when balls are smooth, it’s harder for them to trap sweat and odor.

3. Use Body Powder

One of the most effective things you can do is keep your private area dry so that it’s an inhospitable environment for bacteria and yeast to populate. Using a body powder can help reduce sweat, deodorize, and leave a clean and fresh scent on your private parts. Some powders may also include menthol, which provides a fresh, cooling sensation.

Some men have found success by using antifungal powders. If you’re a DIY kind of guy, you can even use simple cornstarch if you have it in your pantry. If you prefer natural ingredients, you can use products that contain tea tree oil and oatmeal, both of which guard against bacterial growth. Apply the powder directly to your nether regions or sprinkle powder into your underwear before putting them on.

If the messy application from body powders is not your thing, try a body powder lotion. It’s a lotion that goes on silky smooth and dries into a powdery fresh protective barrier that reduces sweat, moisture, odor and chafing.

4. Wear Breathable Clothing/Underwear

Remember, the goal is to keep your nether regions as dry as possible, so don’t constrict your junk. Some experts recommend wearing boxers instead of tight briefs. You want to allow air to circulate around the “cajones” so that sweat has a chance to evaporate instead of pooling and festering.

Lucky for you… there are underwear brands out there made especially for you and your sweaty balls. Many brands are now introducing materials designed to keep your privates cool and fresh. Some even use antimicrobial fabrics that actively fight odor-causing bacteria. Cotton is always good; it’s light and absorbs moisture well. Even better, a cotton-polyester blend can push moisture toward the surface of the material, which allows it to evaporate as your body intended.

And for Pete’s sake, change your underwear at least once a day. You may even want to keep an extra change of underwear with you during the day. This will give you the option of putting on fresh undies rather than sitting in a pool of swampy sweat.

5. Try Deodorizing Creams

Some manufacturers have begun making creams specifically for the jock area. Look for a version that goes on smoothly, has a mild scent, and dries on contact. While they are often effective, you should be aware that some deodorizing creams may leave a white residue on both your hands and your privates after it dries. You can also find a gel-talcum formulation designed to both moisturize and deodorize; it goes on dry from the very beginning and can help keep you funk-free downstairs.

Some of the best versions contain zinc oxide, which provides an effective barrier against chafing and irritation, and helps prevent growth of bacteria and yeast.

6. Cut Down on Chafing

Chafing is one of your greatest enemies. Your testicles can rub against each other during a strenuous workout or even just walking around during the day, resulting in everything from minor irritation to cuts/openings in the skin and even bleeding. Since chafing exacerbates problems in the nether regions, you may want to try an anti-chafing gel. This allows those foldy scrotum layers to pass over one another without creating a lot of friction and irritation.

If you have an intensely irritated groin area, you may also consider bandaging it to prevent chafing while it heals. This will help keep you more comfortable while also stopping further breaking of the skin.

7. Carry Wipes or a Spray

When you’re on the go and can’t make time for a shower, carry deodorizing wipes with you for quick sweaty balls fixes. You can find wipes made specially to combat ball sweat. Many are natural and non-toxic, and contain ingredients like allantoin and aloe vera which fight odor and bacteria without irritating your skin. Keep these stashed where you can easily access them in an emergency situation–your wallet, office desk, gym bag, or back pocket.

Along the same lines, you can also find freshening spritz designed to revive and refresh your junk. Simply spray it around your private area, and the pH-balanced ingredients wipe out sweat and odor. A lot of people who suffer from frequent sweaty balls keep this kind of product stashed conveniently where they can access it for a quick freshen-up when there’s no time for a shower.

Can Sweat Cause Jock Itch?

Can your sweaty balls cause jock itch? Well, sort of. Tinea cruris, also known as jock itch, is a fungal infection that develops within the scrotum area, causing redness, itching, scaling, flaking, and general discomfort. The infection is caused by mold-like fungi that often live on the surface of people’s skin, along with their hair and nails. Most of the time, they’re harmless. But bacteria and fungi love warm, moist environments, and your sweaty groin is an ideal place to live, under the right conditions.

If you’re not keeping your jock area dry during the hot, humid summer, you may be creating a perfect storm of fungi in your crotch. It’s very common for the infection we call jock itch to develop around the inner thighs, groin, and buttocks. While sweaty balls don’t directly lead to the infection, they do help create the right kind of environment for fungi to thrive.

Jock itch is highly contagious. You can catch it from close contact with an infected individual, or even from sharing towels or clothing. Those who are overweight may be more likely to develop jock itch since the skin folds of the groin area are prone to trapping sweat for long periods of time, where fungi can thrive. And jock itch isn’t just for jocks–you don’t have to be an athlete to catch it, you just have to human, which means basically no one is immune.

The good news is that jock itch is typically confined to the epidermis, the top layer of skin, and is easily treatable with over-the-counter or prescription topical medications, like creams. You can prevent jock itch by following all the same guidelines in this post about preventing and fighting sweaty balls and odor in general. In addition, avoid sharing towels or washcloths with others who might have a fungal infection. Consider wearing flip-flops when using public showers at your local gym.

Keep in mind, though, that every rash of the pubic area isn’t necessarily jock itch. If you develop a rash that doesn’t respond to topical medications and isn’t improving or clearing up, make sure to talk with your dermatologist to make sure you’re not dealing with something more serious.

The Battle Against Sweaty Balls

Every man has experienced stinky, sweaty balls at some point in life. Smelly balls syndrome eventually affects us all. If you’re not vigilant, sweat in the groin and testicular area can lead to embarrassing smells and uncomfortable rashes like jock itch. But you don’t have to be the guy with the smelly balls. You can fight back. You can take simple measures to prevent ball sweat, and you have many options for fighting it once it appears. And just so you know, us guys are not alone in this one – women face many similar issues when it comes to preventing and fighting boob sweat.

Fortunately, there are a lot of medical information and scientific products at our fingertips that can help cut down on swamp crotch and scrotum stench. With a little pre-planning, careful hygiene and smart clothing choices, you can keep your private parts as dry and odor-free as possible. You can live your life without stress, fear or self-consciousness, and the battle against stinky, sweaty balls can be won.

Out of the calm comes the impending doom. It happens when you interact with others. Perhaps it’s a meeting, a presentation, a first date, or even a simple chat with a significant someone. You begin to sweat because you’re nervous. Then you get even more nervous because you’re sweating. You’re caught in the vicious vortex of anxiety sweating.

anxiety sweat

11 Tips to Beat Anxiety and Reduce Stress

  • 1. Let Go and Relax
  • 2. Try Meditation, Visualization or Yoga
  • 3. Dress to Sweat Less and Stress Less
  • 4. Limit “Sweat Triggers” from Your Diet
  • 5. Drink Your Water!
  • 6. Consider a Home Remedy
  • 7. Splash Some Cool Water on Your Face and Wrists
  • 8. Carry a Handkerchief or Baby Wipes
  • 9. Use a Prescription-Strength Antiperspirant
  • 10. Anxiety Medications
  • 11. Other More Expensive and Invasive Treatments

Understanding your nerves and social anxiety is the first step to beating stress sweat.

What is Anxiety?

Anxiety is the emotion you feel when you’re afraid or worried. It’s a natural response to stress. When you feel threatened, physically or emotionally, you feel apprehension and fear about what might be coming.

Anxiety is normal and can be healthy. If anxiety is due to a physical threat, adrenaline is injected into the bloodstream and prepares you with the fight or flight reflex.

Emotional anxiety is that worrisome feeling and unease, sometimes vague, that occurs when no physical threat or danger is apparent, but we fear some social or mental threat. Our emotional anxiety can be caused by negative emotions such as sadness, fear, anger, and rejection, to name a few.

Emotional anxiety is normal. However, normally occurring anxiety and anxiety disorders are two very different things. When our emotional anxiety becomes chronic, hard to control, and interferes with daily life–it’s probably an anxiety disorder.

Why Does Anxiety Cause Excessive Sweating?

We have a love/hate relationship with sweat. The body’s sweating mechanism is a marvel of physiological engineering. When triggered by the hypothalamus in the brain, apocrine and eccrine sweat glands secrete sweat. The evaporation of sweat, composed mostly of water, salt and electrolytes, creates a cooling effect that helps maintain body temperature. Sweating at the gym or when working out is desirable and keeps us healthy.

When does sweat turn from desireable to deplorable? When it’s anxiety sweat — sweat that is excessive, embarrassing and only increases its flow when you begin to stress about it.

Stress and anxiety cause the body to secrete the fight or flight hormones that prepare us for action. These hormones cause our breathing rate to increase, our heart to beat faster, our blood pressure to rise, and–you guessed it–our sweat glands are activated to produce more sweat. A lot more. More than we need, and certainly way more sweat than we want.

Why Does Sweating Lead to Anxiety?

Nervous sweating often leads to even more sweating–sometimes uncontrollably–because we feel self-conscious about it during social interaction. It’s a vicious cycle that feeds on itself.

If you suffer from anxiety sweating, this cycle of stress sweat is probably familiar.

You sweat >>> you stress about sweat >>> your stress causes more sweat >>> your sweat causes more stress… you get the picture.

For many of us, stress and anxiety rear their ugly heads when our confidence is low. We wonder if we have what it takes to succeed in a particular set of social circumstances. In a way, our own bodies betray us by signaling to the outside world that we’re nervous. What do those who suffer from social anxiety fear?

Everyday situations that cause social anxiety sweating are:

  • Public speaking
  • Making a request or presenting information
  • Meeting new people
  • Wanting to impress or be accepted
  • Fear of rejection
  • Being judged or evaluated- as in a job interview
  • Looking odd or feeling out of place
  • Being thrust into unfamiliar situations
  • Wanting to be in control

Do I Have Anxiety?

Let’s be clear: Bouts of anxiety are a natural part of life. It’s a normal response to stressful events and situations we all encounter. Family or relationship problems, changing employment and financial worries are some of the common events that can cause anxiety and some degree of anxiety sweating.

But the kind of normal anxiety that we experience from time to time is much different than the kind of chronic, ever-present anxiety that disrupts our lives at every turn. When the symptoms of severe anxiety overshadow the events that caused them and turn everyday life upside down, they could point to an anxiety disorder.

Here are some of the most prevalent signs and symptoms of anxiety disorders:

Excessive Worrying

This kind of worrying is generally linked to anxiety disorders is way out of proportion to the event that triggers it.

Agitation

Anxiety is our way of telling the nervous system that we’re facing some kind of threat. When that happens, blood is diverted away from your digestive system, your heart rate increases as does the rate of your breathing. And, you sweat excessively. While all this may be appropriate and helpful if a real threat is present, it’s debilitating when the threat is only imagined.

Feeling Restless

Restlessness can be a symptom of anxiety disorder, especially when it occurs in children and teens. Not everyone who has been diagnosed with anxiety experience restless feelings, but it is one of the signs doctors look for in diagnosing anxiety.

Fatigue

If you become easily fatigued, it may be a sign of anxiety. It’s often a sign of depression, too.

Difficulty Concentrating

Many people who suffer from anxiety report having trouble concentrating. Studies including children, teens, and adults demonstrate that 60% to 90% of people diagnosed with anxiety have serious difficulty concentrating.

Feeling Irritable

Even those of us who experience normal anxiety levels feel more irritable when we’re feeling anxious. A study including over 6,000 adults found that more than 90% reported having feelings of heightened irritability when their anxiety disorder was in high gear.

Muscle Tension

If your muscles feel tense on most days, that can be another symptom of anxiety disorder. Some doctors have found that treating muscle tension with muscle relaxants can at the same time reduce feelings of anxiety.

Trouble Sleeping

One of the most frequently reported symptoms of anxiety is falling asleep and waking up often during the night. It’s a chicken and egg conundrum. Does anxiety cause insomnia or does insomnia cause anxiety? We just don’t know.

Panic Attacks

Panic disorder is a specific kind of anxiety disorder. A panic attack produces intense episodes of fear. Panic attacks can trigger rapid heartbeat, increased sweating, chest pain, and even nausea.

Fear of Social Situations

Social anxiety disorder is not uncommon and affects an estimated 12% of adults at some point in their lives. If you feel anxious about social events and avoid them, it can be a sign of social anxiety disorder. Fear of being judged, embarrassed, humiliated, or scrutinized by others are red flags that point to social anxiety. Extreme shyness and remaining silent in groups can signal social anxiety, too.

Excessive Sweating

Cold sweats, night sweats, and excessive sweating on the hands, palms, forehead, face, under the arms–and even sweaty feet– can all be symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder. Excessive sweating and uncontrolled sweating could also be caused by hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis is often the root cause of social anxiety.

Diagnosing generalized anxiety disorder includes a physical exam to determine if anxiety might be caused by an underlying medical condition, such as hyperhidrosis, or medications you’re taking. Your medical history and a psychological questionnaire will also be used to arrive at a diagnosis. One such anxiety disorder test includes questions like these:

  • Do a lot of things cause you to worry or feel anxious?
  • Do you think you worry excessively?
  • Do you worry most days?
  • Has it been six months or more that you’ve been worrying like this?
  • Do you have difficulty controlling your worry?
  • Have you noted physical symptoms like, trouble sleeping, feeling restless, chronic fatigue, tense muscles, trouble with concentration or feeling easily irritated?
  • Is your ability to function at work, in social situations, at school or in other areas of importance to you, negatively affected by your worrying?

If you’re wondering if you have an anxiety disorder or if you have anxiety attack symptoms, visit with your doctor. Anxiety disorders and panic attacks can be treated and managed.

What Causes Anxiety?

Stress is the number one cause of anxiety. For those who suffer from anxiety sweating, the phrase, “Don’t sweat it,” seems like mockery. Anxious people stress over almost everything, and that stress makes them sweat. A lot. Learning how to stop stress sweat and finding an effective stress treatment are high priorities.

Stress and sweat travel together, and they’re rarely separated. There are three basic causes of sweat: heat, activity, and–you guessed it–stress. We produce different types of sweat depending on the cause.

Sweat from heat and activity is secreted by the eccrine sweat glands. It is composed of 99% water and small amounts of protein, lipids, and other nutrients. It’s the kind of sweat that cools us down as it evaporates.

In contrast, stress sweat comes from apocrine sweat glands. Of the 2 to 4 million sweat glands that cover our bodies, most are eccrine glands. Apocrine glands are concentrated in areas where there is an abundance of hair follicles, like armpits, and around the genitals. Apocrine glands secrete sweat that is thicker than heat sweat and contains more lipids, nutrients, and proteins. Stress causes the apocrine glands to push stress sweat to the surface of the skin.

Waiting on the skin’s surface is bacteria. When bacteria come into contact with the high levels of protein and nutrients in stress sweat, the bacteria begin to feast. The result is not only unsightly moisture, but it also produces a strong odor. A really bad, offensive odor. To answer the question, “Does stress sweat smell worse than sweat from exercise?” the answer is a resounding YES.

Here’s another interesting tidbit. Recent studies have found that people can tell if sweat odor is caused by emotional stress. Your smelly stress body odor lets everybody know that you’re anxious.

Stress and stress sweat can be caused by perceived physical threats, emotional anxiety, pain, and mental duress. Most of us experience stress sweat before a job interview, making a presentation in a meeting, receiving criticism or evaluation or even running late for an appointment.

How to Stop Stress Sweat

Ideally, the best way to stop anxiety sweating is to simply stop the stress. But for most of us, that’s just not an available option. So, here are a few ways to stop stress sweat and the unpleasant odor it brings:

Deodorants

Deodorants can stop stress sweat odor, although they can’t stop the sweat itself. Fragrances mask the undesirable odor and may help reduce bacteria, but they can’t do anything about those telltale sweat marks around your armpits.

Antiperspirants

Everyday antiperspirants can temporarily block sweat glands when the aluminum chloride ingredient comes in contact with sweat. These products usually contain a fragrance as well.

Prescription-Strength Antiperspirants

Prescription-strength antiperspirant products contain higher concentrations of aluminum chloride and can be purchased without a prescription. A single application can last up to 7 days. Prescription-strength antiperspirants can be an effective stress sweat treatment that works for many who suffer from stress sweating caused by anxiety or hyperhidrosis.

Other Treatments

If you find that antiperspirants or prescription antiperspirants don’t adequately manage or stop your stress sweat, there are other stress sweat treatments. However, these are more invasive and expensive. Treatment options include Botox injections, microwave treatments, and even surgical sweat gland removal.

How to Deal with Anxiety and Stress Sweat

Here are 11 ways to deal with sweat caused by stress and chronic anxiety:

1. Let Go and Relax

Much of the anxiety we all experience from time to time is due to our need to feel in control. Letting go of the urge to control every situation can go a long way to reducing the stress we feel. It sounds overly simplistic but relaxing a little can make a big difference.

2. Meditation, Visualization or Yoga

Meditation can help you contain your anxious feelings and relax your breathing. Relaxed breathing can quell an active stress response and help reduce stress. Visualizing desired outcomes and behavior can help form a healthy response to a stressful situation. Yoga is a mind-body activity that brings together physical activity, breathing control, meditation, and relaxation.

3. Dress to Sweat Less and Stress Less

Wearing loose-fitting clothes that breathes easily can help reduce sweating due to anxiety. Avoid tight-fitting clothing and artificial fabrics that aren’t absorbent and may constrict airflow. Don’t wear the same shoes every day and avoid socks made of cotton as they don’t wick away moisture. Wearing the right socks and changing them often will help keep sweaty feet at bay.

4. Limit “Sweat Triggers” from Your Diet

Your diet and blood sugar level can either help or hinder your efforts to control sweating due to anxiety. Here are some foods and beverages to avoid:

  • Stimulants, like caffeine, can put your nerves on edge. Minimize or eliminate coffee, tea, and caffeinated soft drinks.
  • Fatty, processed foods are low in fiber and harder to digest. Longer digestion times raise your body’s temperature and can trigger more perspiration.
  • Spicy foods.

5. Drink Your Water

Don’t skimp on your water consumption. Water contributes to just about every critical body function. When you don’t get enough water to keep your body running smoothly, it can lead to stress and anxiety. In fact, dehydration and stress go hand-in-hand. Stay hydrated to keep anxiety and sweat at bay.

6. Consider a Home Remedy

Home remedies for controlling sweat include herbal products like sage, chamomile, valerian root, and St. John’s Wort. When applied to the skin, apple cider vinegar is an astringent that can contract skin pores. Tomato juice is thought to have the same astringent effect as apple cider vinegar. Other natural treatments include tea tree oil (another astringent), fresh lemon rubbed on your underarms, and applying cornstarch, baking soda, or baby powder to sweaty areas. These remedies may be less effective if your sweat is caused by an anxiety disorder. But give them a try; they may work for you.

7. Splash Some Cool Water on Your Face and Wrists

Breaking away to a restroom for a few moments to splash some cool water on your face and wrists can help reduce profuse sweating caused by anxiety. Cooling your face and wrists signals the body that its internal temperature is okay. Also, taking, a minute or two away from the action will provide time to take a few deep breaths, slow down your breathing, and can help you relax.

8. Carry a Handkerchief or Baby Wipes

This is a simple but effective way of temporarily dealing with excessive sweat. When you experience forehead sweat or sweaty palms, a handkerchief can mop up profuse sweat before it becomes noticeable. If you can duck into a nearby restroom, a baby wipe can be used to clean up under your arms or wipe away nervous sweating.

9. Use a Prescription-Strength Antiperspirant

Applying a prescription-strength antiperspirant helps prevent sweat before it can cause you anxiety. A prescription-strength antiperspirant, like SweatBlock, can eliminate armpit sweat for up to 7 days. The powerful aluminum chloride ingredient blocks sweat glands and prevents perspiration from reaching the skin’s surface. Wetness and bad odor are prevented before they even happen. And now, there are specially formulated antiperspirant creams that can be applied to the hands and feet as well.

10. Anxiety Medications

If your profuse sweating is caused by stress, anxiety medication may help. Benzodiazepines are often prescribed for panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and social anxiety disorder. Brand names include Xanax, Librium, Klonopin, Valium, and Ativan.

11. Other More Invasive and Expensive Treatments

If none of these remedies are helping you, it may be time to consider other more complex treatments. These medical treatments can be expensive and require a doctor’s care.

Botox Injections

Botox is a neurotoxin made from botulism microbes. Botox injected directly into the areas where sweating is a problem blocks the nerves from communicating with the sweat glands. While effective, Botox injections must be repeated every 6 months or so to prevent chronic anxiety sweat.

Microwave Therapy

Microwave therapy makes use of a device that sucks sweat glands close to the surface of the skin and then destroys them with microwave energy. A qualified doctor must perform this procedure.

Anticholinergic Drugs

Anticholinergic drugs work to block the hormone the nervous system uses to send signals to your sweat glands. When the signals are blocked, you don’t experience sweating of any kind. These drugs are expensive and come with a number of unwanted side effects.

Sweat Gland Surgery

As a final and last resort, doctors can surgically remove your sweat glands from the sites most prone to excessive and uncontrolled sweating. There are some potentially serious drawbacks to this procedure, and that’s why it’s reserved for only the most serious cases.

Dealing with Anxiety Sweating

Everybody experiences anxiety from time to time. But when anxiety takes control of your life and leads to excessive sweating (which in turn causes more anxiety), there are steps you can take to minimize your stress and calm your sweat glands.

The information in this article should better inform and educate about anxiety sweating and what can be done to curtail or eliminate it. Seek to understand the cause of your anxiety and try these tips for reducing sweating and staying calm. One of these solutions is bound to work for you. Think how much better life could be when anxiety sweating is no longer a problem. With the help of these remedies, you’ll be able to calm your mind–and your sweat glands.

Are you afraid to raise your arms? Do you often wear a coat or jacket to hide your sweaty armpits– even when it’s hot? Is your excessive armpit sweat always on your mind? If so, you’re among the millions of people who want to know why– and how– to stop sweaty underarms.

Why Do Armpits Sweat So Much?

Apocrine sweat glands are the real culprits when it comes to armpit sweat. Apocrine glands are found in high concentrations in the armpits, the groin, and areas around the nipples and breasts. Apocrine glands are a dual threat: Not only are they the cause for embarrassing and excessive underarm sweating, but the sweat from these glands also smells bad when it comes into contact with bacteria lying in wait on your skin. Soaked armpits and BO (body odor) are traveling companions. Fortunately, both can be controlled or eliminated.

sweaty armpits

Profuse armpit sweating can be caused by several factors:

Nervous Sweating

Whether it’s a job interview, first date, or an important business presentation, anxiety can cause nervous sweating, especially under the arms. If you are embarrassed by your sweating, that can make you even more nervous– which leads to more sweating. It’s a vicious cycle. When the stress or anxiety ends, so does the excessive armpit sweat.

Hot, Humid Environments

What happens to us on hot, sweltering days? Tidal waves of sweat wash over our us, making armpit sweat even worse. Like automatic sprinklers, your sweat glands turn on full blast until you cool down. Even though it’s healthy and normal, visible sweat is often embarrassing.

Physical Exercise

When you work out or engage in any strenuous exercise, eccrine sweat glands work overtime to stabilize body temperature. Your hypothalamus, which acts as your body’s thermometer, signals your sweat glands to secrete increased amounts of salty, smelly perspiration. Your heart rate increases, your blood pressure spikes, and you start breathing heavily. This elevated activity tells your sweat glands to pump harder.

Diet

Your diet matters– you really are what you eat, as the saying goes. Your eating habits can have a significant impact on your sweating.

Pregnancy

When you’re pregnant, hormone levels go bonkers, your metabolism can go wacky, and your blood pressure climbs. This causes your body to produce more sweat. But not to worry– in nine months, these bodily functions should normalize.

Menopause

Ladies, menopause plays havoc with your hormones, especially estrogen. The most common symptoms of hormonal changes are hot flashes and increased sweating. As far as hormones are concerned, menopause is a lot like pregnancy and will normalize in time.

Diabetes

Two things frequently happen to people with diabetes. First, diabetics tend to be overweight. Second, diabetic neuropathy caused by higher than normal levels of glucose can occur. Normal nerve function can be adversely affected if blood sugar levels stay high for too long. These two physiological factors dramatically increase the likelihood of increased sweating.

Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis is a medical situation known for excessive and uncontrolled sweating, usually with no discernible cause. Axillary hyperhidrosis, the medical term for excessive armpit sweat, is profuse and uncontrolled sweating of the underarms. While it’s a physiological condition, people who have it affirm that it also negatively affects their quality of life– physically, socially, emotionally and psychologically.

9 Ways to Stop Sweaty Armpits:

Knowing what causes armpit sweat is all well and good. But knowing how to stop sweating is even better. Most of these remedies can be accomplished at home without seeing a doctor or undergoing an invasive treatment. A few remedies will require a doctor’s care. Read on and see which remedies may be right for you.

1. Stay Hydrated to Reduce Underarm Sweating

Drinking lots of cool water throughout the day will help maintain your body’s internal temperature and control the sweating mechanism. Ample hydration can short circuit the body’s nervous system response to factors that trigger sweating by keeping body temperature lower, which in turn, reduces sweat production.

How much water should you drink? As much as it takes to prevent thirst, and enough so that your urine is more on the clear side than on the yellow. For some of us, this means drinking more than we’re used to. The rule of thumb, according to conventional wisdom, is to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water every day. If you know you’ll be in a situation or environment that will create more sweating, drink even more.

2. Wear Breathable Clothing

Another natural and often effective way to combat excessive sweating is found in the clothes you wear. Your choice of clothing can either increase perspiration in the underarm areas, or help you feel more comfortable and confident.

Clothing made from natural materials will help you stay cooler and avoid sweaty armpits, reducing those nasty sweat stains. Fabrics such as cotton, wool, silk, and linen weave together more loosely, enabling them to breathe. These natural fibers also absorb moisture. By keeping moisture off the skin, you can prevent sweat from mixing with the bacteria that causes a strong smell and brings unwanted attention.

On the other hand, clothing made from man-made fibers like nylon, rayon, and polyester doesn’t breathe well. These artificial materials are woven together much more tightly and actually prevent moisture from evaporating. Do we need to go into detail about what trapped heat and moisture in and around your armpits will do to your social life? Global climate change is bad enough without creating a mini-greenhouse effect in your underarms.

To be fair, there are some man-made microfiber fabrics that are designed to wick away moisture from the skin so it can evaporate more quickly. If you’re going to wear clothing made from artificial fibers, make sure it’s not going to make life more difficult.

3. Use Antiperspirant

One of the questions we hear most often is “what’s the best deodorant for sweaty armpits?” You probably already use a deodorant every day to prevent embarrassing body odor. Deodorants are a one-trick-pony, however, and only cover up the odor. While stopping odor is good, stopping sweat is better.

For that, you need more than a deodorant: You need an antiperspirant. Deodorant and antiperspirant are not the same, learn more here.

An antiperspirant containing some form of aluminum salt compound (usually aluminum chloride) can reduce underarm sweat. Antiperspirants are available in many forms, including roll-ons, sprays, and solid rub-on sticks. There are formulations specifically designed for men and for women. They are readily available in every grocery store and drug store.

The aluminum chloride (or similar) ingredient works to block sweat glands in the armpits. When aluminum chloride comes into contact with water, it combines with moisture in perspiration to create a gel-like plug that temporarily blocks the sweat glands. Since sweat cannot reach the skin’s surface, you stay dry.

Everyday antiperspirants can be an effective armpit sweat treatment for those who don’t sweat excessively. The plugs dissipate over time, so everyday antiperspirants are just that– they must be applied every day. And, be careful: You’ll want to wait a day or so after shaving your armpits, as antiperspirants can cause mild skin irritation.

4. Try a Clinical or Prescription Strength Antiperspirant

For many of us, everyday antiperspirants are just not enough. If that’s true for you and your armpits feel like a wet sauna all the time, you may want to try a prescription strength antiperspirant. These antiperspirants contain higher concentrations of aluminum chloride.

These are the strongest antiperspirants you can get without having to visit your doctor. Because clinical strength antiperspirants are more powerful, they’re an ideal solution for people who suffer from excessive armpit sweating or axillary hyperhidrosis.

5. Learn to Manage Stress and Anxiety

Stress seems to be inescapable. Public speaking, meeting new people, a job interview, family concerns, or just trying to get through traffic can cause stress, anxiety, and nervous sweating. When you become anxious, the flight responses kick in– your breathing rate increases, your heart begins to race, your mouth suddenly feels like the Mojave Desert, and– you guessed it– your sweat glands switch into overdrive.

How can we sweat less when faced with stressful situations? Try to understand what triggers your anxiety, so you can stay relaxed. Letting go of the constant need to be in control can help quiet your body’s response to anxiety.

Other important elements of stress management include proper exercise, getting enough sleep, and replacing negative thoughts with optimistic ones. You may find meditation or yoga helpful in managing anxiety. Find what works for you and your armpits will stay drier.

6. Is Your Diet to Blame for Sweaty Armpits?

Are you one of those people who finds that certain foods and beverages cause more underarm sweat? Some of the things we take into our bodies not only cause us to sweat more profusely, but they cause us to smell bad too. Among the repeat offenders are caffeinated beverages, alcoholic drinks, onions, garlic, and peppers.

It might not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the world runs on caffeine. It’s in hot morning beverages, soft drinks, energy drinks, and countless other beverages and snacks. If your morning starts with a few cups of coffee, and your day is punctuated with a popular caffeinated soft drink or two, you have an important choice to make.

Coffee and tea not only raise your internal temperature, but the caffeine they contain sends your sweat glands into high gear. Additional sources of caffeine throughout the day certainly don’t help. Spicy foods can also cause your body to pump out more sweat. Peppers contain a compound called capsaicin, which can signal your sweat glands to work harder. Changing your diet can help reduce sweating.

7. Check Your Medications

If you’re sweating more than usual– not just in your armpits, but on your feet, palms, groin, neck, or thighs– you might want to reevaluate the medications you’re taking. Here’s a list of some most common medications known to cause excessive sweating.

  • Antidepressants
  • Migraine Medications
  • Pain Relievers
  • Diabetes Medication
  • Asthma Inhalers
  • Heartburn and Reflux Medicine
  • Sildenafil (Viagra)
  • Breast Cancer Medications

8. See Your Doctor

Unrelenting and excessive sweating may be caused by an underlying illness or condition. A visit to your doctor is the best way to determine if there’s something more than sweating occurring. Excessive sweating for men and women can be caused by heart disease, thyroid problems, hypoglycemia, leukemia, tuberculosis, and other disorders.

Hyperhidrosis is another condition responsible for excessive sweating. Primary focal hyperhidrosis affects a certain area (or areas) of the body. Excessive armpit sweating is called axillary hyperhidrosis, which is a form of primary focal hyperhidrosis.

The second form hyperhidrosis is called generalized hyperhidrosis, and it affects the entire body. This type of hyperhidrosis is often caused by an underlying illness or condition. Your doctor will be able to accurately diagnose any illnesses or condition that may be responsible for your excessive sweating.

9. Consider Other Medical Solutions

If none of the remedies we’ve discussed so far helps reduce your excessive armpit sweating, you may want to explore more expensive and invasive ways of reducing underarm sweat.

Botox Treatments
Botox (Botulinum Toxin) is best known as a treatment for reducing wrinkles. Botox can also reduce the effects of excessive sweating, especially in the armpits, by temporarily disrupting the chemical substance that signals armpit sweat glands. Botox treatments for excessive underarm sweat are temporary and must be repeated every 6 to 12 months.

Nerve-Blocking Medications for Hyperhidrosis
Some medications taken orally can block the chemicals that allow certain nerves to communicate with each other. These are called anticholinergics. The effects are similar to those achieved through Botox injections. The medication works by blocking the chemical acetylcholine in its travel to the receptors on the sweat glands. These drugs are not for everyone and they do come with unwanted side effects.

Topically applied anticholinergics, like Qbrexza (recently FDA approved), are also available for axillary hyperhidrosis.

Microwave Treatments for Excessive Sweating Symptoms
If the thought of having your armpit sweat glands microwaved (or nuked in today’s vernacular), doesn’t bother you, this approach might work. Treatments like miraDry use microwave energy to destroy the sweat glands responsible for underarm sweat. After local anesthesia is administered by your doctor, a vacuum-like hand-held device is used to pull sweat glands close to the surface of the skin. While the device cools the upper layers of your skin, the microwaves destroy the sweat glands in your underarms.

Sweat Gland Removal Surgery
Extremely severe underarm sweating may be treated by permanently removing sweat glands. The procedure requires the services of a plastic surgeon. Either a traditional surgical approach or a less invasive treatment called “suction curettage” can be used. Suction curettage is a modified form of liposuction. It’s an outpatient treatment so there’s no need to spend a night in the hospital.