Tips, Tools and Tricks to beat unwanted, embarrassing sweat.

When sweating reaches epic proportions, you need something more than pedestrian store-shelf antiperspirants. You need a heavy weight contender – a prescription, or prescription “strength” antiperspirant. Here’s your guide to prescription-only and clinical strength antiperspirants.

prescription antiperspirant

What is prescription antiperspirant?

As the name implies, prescription antiperspirants require a prescription and a doctor’s supervision. They cannot be purchased anywhere but a pharmacy. The concentration of active aluminum ingredient in these products is generally around 20%. Prescription options are not to be taken lightly. Misuse of prescription antiperspirants can lead to serious unwanted side effects. (we’ll talk about this later)

How does prescription antiperspirant work?

All antiperspirants, regardless of brand name or strength level, use aluminum salt as the active ingredient. The most common aluminum salt compounds found in today’s antiperspirants are aluminum chloride, aluminum chlorohydrate, aluminum chloride hexaydrate and aluminum zirconium tricholorhydrex glycine.

While the effectiveness of these varies, each of these aluminum compounds works to reduce sweating in the same basic way. When they get close to water, in this case perspiration, they soak up the moisture and thicken into a gel-like substance. By spreading aluminum chloride, or one of its cousins, on areas that sweat, the resulting reaction forms a gel-like plug that blocks the sweat glands and prevents sweat from reaching the skin’s surface. Once this happens the body’s feedback mechanism stops the flow of perspiration.

The plugs dissipate over time and the sweat glands begin to function as before. That’s when the antiperspirant must be reapplied. Depending on the strength of the antiperspirant, the reapplication time may range from several hours to several days.

Prescription Antiperspirant vs. Prescription “Strength” Antiperspirant. Is there a difference?

It’s not uncommon for people to confuse the two. But they are different.

Prescription strength simply means really strong. A prescription strength antiperspirant will have more Aluminum salts or use a more potent form of Aluminum. For example, Aluminum Chloride is a lot stronger than Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex (Used in antiperspirants like Dove, Old Spice and Degree.)

Most clinical and prescription strength products will use Aluminum Chloride (usually around 12%-15%)

Prescription Strength and Clinical Strength are often used interchangeably, but they’re pretty much the same thing.

Prescription-only antiperspirants are even stronger, require a prescription, and can only be purchased at a pharmacy. They usually contain a higher concentration of Aluminum Chloride (20% or more) and can be more effective in extreme sweating cases. Last of all, a prescription option will most likely carry with it additional health risks and side effects. (more on this below…)

Prescription Antiperspirant Options:

Some of the more common prescription antiperspirant brands include:

  • Drysol is a popular prescription antiperspirant designed to treat hyperhidrosis and excessive sweating. Can be used on the underarms, scalp, hands, and feet. Active Ingredient: Aluminum chloride hexahydrate (20%)
  • Xerac AC is a topical, prescription-only treatment designed for use on the underarms, palms and feet.
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum Chloride Hexahydrate (6.25%)
  • Formalaz is a sweating treatment specifically designed to combat foot odor and sweat. A prescription-only option for plantar hyperhidrosis or foot sweating. Active ingredient: Formaldehyde (10%)

Prescription antiperspirant is strong stuff and should only be considered after exhausting all other over-the-counter hyperhidrosis and excessive sweating treatments.

Best Prescription Strength Antiperspirant Products:

Try some of these popular prescription strength and clinical strength antiperspirants before resorting to prescription-only. Many of these products can be purchased online via Amazon or at your local drug store.

  • SweatBlock Clinical Antiperspirant
    “When nothing else works!” The original 7-day antiperspirant. Formulated to reduce excessive sweating and axillary hyperhidrosis. According to users, SweatBlock keeps you dry for an average of 6.4 days and seems to work when nothing else will.
    Effective for: Armpit sweating and hyperhidrosis
    Application: Towelette (wipe)
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum Chloride (14%)
  • Driclor
    This another over-the-counter prescription strength option. It’s made in Australia and can be used for treating excessive sweating of the hands, feet and armpits. If you’re worried about sweat stains in your shirt, you’ll want to avoid this one.
    Effective for: Hands, Feet, and Armpit Sweatin
    Application: Roll-on
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum hexahydrate (20%)
  • Certain Dri Prescription Strength
    The strongest antiperspirant in the Certain Dri family. Designed for underarm use and can last up to 72 hours per application.
    Effective for: Underarm Sweating / Axillary Hyperhidrosis
    Application: Roll-on
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum Chloride (12%)
  • Odaban Antiperspirant Spray
    Offers 24-hour protection and may be the strongest non prescription antiperspirant available. It contains high concentrations of aluminum chloride which can increase effectiveness. But with increased effectiveness comes increased chance for skin irritation and burning.
    Effective for: Armpits, Hands, Feet
    Application: Spray
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum chloride (20%)
  • Maxim Prescription Strength Antiperspirant
    Over the counter hyperhidrosis treatment designed for underarm use.
    Effective for: Underarm Sweating / Axillary Hyperhidrosis
    Application: Roll-on
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum Chloride (15%)
  • ZeroSweat Antiperspirant AKA “Z Sweat” or “0 Sweat”
    For excessive sweating. This Certain Dri knock-off claims to “Keep You Dry – Guaranteed”.
    Application: Roll-on
    Active Ingredient: Aluminum Chloride (15%)

If none of the above options work for you, it’s time to look at a prescription only product.

Should I Use a Prescription Strength Antiperspirant?

Choosing a prescription antiperspirant isn’t the same as picking out a pair of shoes or doing price comparisons on vacuum cleaners.

This is a personal question and you and your doctor are the only ones qualified to tackle it. But here’s a few things to consider as you venture down the path of prescription hyperhidrosis treatments.

How severe is your sweating? You wouldn’t be here reading this fascinating article if sweat wasn’t somewhat excessive. But how bad is it? If it’s an occasional inconvenience, you probably don’t need prescription strength. If profuse sweating has transformed you into a cave-dwelling hermit who avoids all social interaction, you’re barking up the right tree.

Which sweating treatments have you already tried? Again, if you’re reading this, you’ve probably tried A LOT. But if you’ve only experimented with Old Spice and Degree, you still have a lot of non prescription options on the table. It’s best to exhaust all over-the-counter antiperspirant options before reaching for a prescription solution.

Have you talked to your doctor? Your doctor will be able to help you more than any blog post or article. If you’ve tried everything and nothing seems relieve your excessive sweating, talk to your doctor about available prescription anti-perspirants.

Ultimately, your doctor will know which antiperspirant options are safe and can guide you through the process of finding one that works best for your body chemistry and severity of sweating.

Prescription Antiperspirant Risks & Side Effects:

The best part about prescription anti-perspirants is that they’re super strong. The worst part… they come with side effects and potential health risks like:

  • Allergic reactions like hives, rash, itching, chest tightness, swelling of the face, lips, tongue or throat.
  • Severe burning, itching, redness or swelling of treated areas.

These precautions should be observed when using Prescription antiperspirants:

  • Always consult a doctor before using any Prescription antiperspirant.
  • Tell your doctor if you are using Antabuse (disulfiram) before using.
  • Do not use any other deodorant or antiperspirant (unless your doctor says otherwise)
  • Avoid getting Prescription antiperspirant in your eyes, nose, mouth or on your lips.
  • Do not use any antiperspirant on irritated or broken skin.
  • Wait at least 24 to 48 hours when applying to shaved areas.
  • Prescription antiperspirants may stain clothing and metal surfaces.
  • It is not known if the use of Drysol and other Prescription antiperspirants may harm an unborn baby.

Alternative Treatments to Prescription Antiperspirant:

It might be worth exploring outside the realm of prescription antiperspirant. Hyperhidrosis has been around for a long time and many treatments have been developed over the years. Their effectiveness varies, but some have proven very efficient at stopping embarrassing sweat. Here’s a few of them…

  • Clinical Strength Antiperspirants. Over-the-counter clinical antiperspirants are stronger than your average Dove or Speedstick, but don’t require a doctor and don’t come with as many side effects or potential health risks. We like this one (wink… wink)
  • Qbrexza Cloth. A prescription-only treatment for axillary hyperhdirosis. This medicated cloth is designed for underarm topical use. It contains a nerve blocking solution that stops underarm sweat in its tracks. It can be extremely effective, but comes with a long list of unwanted side effects.
  • Iontophoresis is a treatment that uses electric currents in water to drive medications into the skin. Can be very effective, yet very expensive.
  • Botox injections in affected areas can curtail sweating for months before they must be repeated. Effective, but painful and not permanent.
  • Miradry is a procedure that uses microwaves to nuke your sweat glands. No more sweat glands leads to no more sweat.

So, your favorite shoes stink. You don’t dare take them off even though your feet are screaming to be let out. Embarrassing, but true. Don’t worry, help is on the way.

Here’s 16 Home Remedies for Stinky Shoes:

  • 1. Wash + exfoliate feet (especially in between toes)
  • 2. Stop sweaty feet to stop stinky shoes
  • 3. Foot and shoe deodorant spray
  • 4. Wear shoes that breathe (reduce sweat + bacteria)
  • 5. Alternate your shoes – give them time to air out
  • 6. Use shoe insoles to fight foot odor
  • 7. Sprinkle baking sode in those stinky shoes
  • 8. Keep shoes fresh smelling with dryer sheets
  • 9. Deodorize shoes with cat litter or wood chips ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 10. Clean shoes with rubbing alcohol
  • 11. Steam clean shoes
  • 12. Denture tablet shoe soak
  • 13. Freeze the stink out of your shoes
  • 14. Spray essential oils into your shoes
  • 15. Use tea bags to keep shoes smelling fresh
  • 16. If all else fails: Spring for new shoes

Where do stinky shoes come from anyway? The answer is… well… obvious. First comes foot sweat, then comes bacteria, then comes stinky feet, socks and shoes.

Why do my feet stink?

Foot odor is a universal problem unless you happen to live someplace where shoes are not worn. Most of us spend many hours a day in our shoes, so let’s talk about what causes foot odor.

Our feet smell because they sweat inside our shoes. When the sweat reaches the skin’s surface the foot sweat encounters bacteria that break it down. The decomposing sweat releases an offensive odor. The medical term for smelly feet is Bromodosis. The common term is stinky feet.

Here’s a fun physiological fact: There are more sweat glands in human feet than anywhere else on the human body.

You’re more likely to have smelly feet if you’re in your shoes most of the day. Stress can cause sweaty, stinky feet, as can a medical disorder called hyperhidrosis. Athlete’s foot and other fungal infections can also lead to bad foot odor. Hormonal changes that are prevalent in teenagers and pregnant women can cause abnormal sweating which leads to heightened foot odor.

Stinky feet = stinky shoes.

Let’s first talk about how to prevent stinky feet and then we’ll talk about how to get the smell out of shoes and other helpful odor-fighting remedies.

1. Wash + exfoliate feet to prevent stinky shoes

Since stinky shoes start with stinky feet, seems like that’s a good place to begin. Practicing good foot hygiene can help keep the foot odor down.

Wash your feet every day. Even if you don’t shower or bathe every day, take the time to wash your feet with warm soapy water. Rinse thoroughly and then dry with a clean, dry towel. Make sure you clean between your toes where bacteria love to grow.

Exfoliate. Removing dead skin can reduce foot odor. Scrub your feet with an exfoliating pad or pumice stone.

Keep your feet dry. The bacteria that reacts with sweat thrives in moist areas. If your socks or shoes are wet, you’ve set up a feast for odor-causing bacteria. Wear breathable socks made of fabric that will wick away foot perspiration. Wearing shoes without socks may be fashionably cool, but it’s never a good idea. If you like stinky tennis shoes, don’t wear socks.

2. Stop sweaty feet to stop stinky shoes

If you’re often plagued by sweaty feet, you’ll want to focus on stopping some of that sweat. An antiperspirant lotion like SweatBlock is perfect for reducing excessive sweat on the feet. Your feet contain more sweat glands than any other part of your body. Bacteria love sweaty feet and and stink loves bacteria.

If you can reduce some of that foot sweating, you can reduce a lot of the stink that comes along with it.

3. Use a foot and shoe deodorant spray

A deodorizing foot spray is a great way to freshen both your shoes and your feet at the same time. Just shake the can a few times and you’re ready to spray. This quick and effective remedy is perfect for active walkers, sports enthusiasts, and students after gym class. The small spray bottle fits easily in your backpack or gym bag, and the fresh smelling spray will make your feet and shoes smell great right away. The deodorant spray provides natural anti-fungal protection and works on all types of shoes, sandals, and slippers.

4. Wear shoes that breathe

One of the most effective remedies is simple: Wear the right shoes. The best shoes for stinky feet are made from leather or breathable fabric. These materials allow moisture to vent to the outside world. Avoid shoes made of vinyl or other man-made materials. Non-breathable shoes act to prevent moisture dissipation and evaporation. And once you unlace those babies, you and anybody in the area will be reaching for a gas mask.

5. Alternate your shoes – give them time to air out

The smell of your shoes can be greatly reduced by not wearing the same pair on consecutive days. Of course, this means you’ll need more than one pair of shoes. Assuming that you have at least two pairs, alternate the days you wear them. Give ‘em a well-deserved rest. On their days off, pull out the tongue, loosen the laces and put them in a ventilated spot where they can air out.

6. Use shoe insoles to fight foot odor

Another way to minimize shoe odor is with specially treated insoles. Several varieties are available at your favorite grocery or drug store. They’re treated with activated charcoal or baking soda (or both) and neutralize unpleasant odors. They not only provide long-lasting odor protection (a few weeks or months), but they can also absorb foot moisture and add extra footbed cushioning.

Most brands come in a standard size that can be easily cut to fit any size shoe. These odor-neutralizing insoles are especially useful in taming those smelly gym shoes.

7. Sprinkle baking soda in those stinky shoes

Baking soda is another good home remedy for stinky shoes. Sprinkle generous amounts of baking soda in the offending shoe(s). Let the power of baking soda do its thing overnight. Dump it out in the morning and, boom, your shoes are as fresh as new. Well, maybe not quite that fresh, but they’re ready for the upcoming day.

One caution: Be careful about using baking soda too often with leather shoes, as it can extract the moisture from the leather and cause it to dry out and crack.

8. Keep shoes fresh smelling with dryer sheets

If we’re going to talk about how to deodorize shoes, we should mention using dryer sheets. It’s another unusual idea to freshen stinky shoes.

Take a standard dryer sheet, tear it in half and place one half in each shoe. Let the shoes sit overnight. Really stinky tennis shoes may require more time. Just remember to pull the dryer sheets out before putting on the newly freshened shoes.

Bonus tip: If you keep your gym shoes in a gym bag, throw a dryer sheet into the bottom of the gym bag. It will act as a shoe and gym clothes deodorizer.

9. Deodorize shoes with cat litter or wood chips

If your shoes are attracting attention (the wrong kind) because of shoe odor, here’s a hack you may want to try. You’ll need some cedar wood chips or kitty litter. You’ll also need some clean old socks or paper towels.

This cure is easy: Fill up a pair of old, but clean, socks with either cedar wood chips or cat litter. Place one of the socks in each shoe, and let them stand overnight. The wood chips or kitty litter will absorb the foot odor hiding in the shoes. Citrus peels can also do a passable job of refreshing your shoes.

10. Clean shoes with rubbing alcohol

Rubbing alcohol can be used to kill odor and clean your shoes. There are two methods.

The first utilizes a mixture of water and alcohol. Take a cup of water and a cup of rubbing alcohol. Mix them together in a spray bottle. Spray the solution on the inside and outside of each shoe. Place the treated shoes in a well-ventilated area where they can dry.

The alcohol acts to kill the bacteria that causes stinky shoes. The alcohol will also help dry out areas where moisture collects.

The second method uses alcohol and cotton balls. Saturate several cotton balls with rubbing alcohol. Place the saturated cotton balls in each shoe, filling up all the space. Be sure to get them way down in the toe area, and let the shoes stand overnight. Things should be looking up and smelling much fresher in the morning.

Tip: How to wash tennis shoes and sneakers to get rid of foot odor

Today’s tennis shoes (athletic shoes) and sneakers often cost north of $100. To keep them looking and smelling like new, you can use your washing machine. To protect your investment, there are a few steps to follow. This method works well for fabric and leather athletic shoes.

  • 1. Remove the laces (if any) and any removable insoles or inserts.
  • 2. Wipe away any loose dirt and debris.
  • 3. Place shoes, minus laces and inserts, in a mesh bag or pillowcase. Secure the opening so the shoes can’t come out.
  • 4. If you have a washing machine with an agitator, include some towels along with the shoes to balance the load. If you have a newer machine without an agitator, you probably don’t need the towels.
  • 5. Wash in warm water with a heavy-duty detergent.
  • 6. Air dry your newly cleaned shoes. NEVER put them in the dryer.
  • 7. Use a solution of water and baking soda to hand clean the insoles/inserts.

11. Steam clean shoes to kill bacteria and odor

Steam can help eradicate bacteria and foot odor in your shoes. If you have a dryer with a steam feature, give that a try. Be sure that you try this method on shoes that can tolerate moisture.

Another method using steam requires a steam cleaning appliance. These are used for cleaning and disinfecting things around the house. Just stick the steam machine’s nozzle into each shoe for about 30 seconds. Let them completely dry before wearing again.

12. Denture tablet shoe soak

You’ll only want to use this method on shoes that can be submerged completely in water without damage.

Take a bucket or medium size bin. Fill it with hot water. Drop in 3 to 4 denture tablets and allow them to dissolve. Toss in your sneakers and let them soak for 2 to 3 hours. Not only will they smell better but they’ll be germ-free, at least for a while.

13. Freeze the stink out of your shoes

Disgusting foot odor is caused by bacteria lurking in the dark recesses of your footwear. Putting them in the freezer overnight kills this bacteria. These foul-intentioned germs can’t stand the cold environment. But first, you’ll want to protect whatever else is in the freezer by following these simple steps:

  • Make sure your shoes are completely dry.
  • Put them in a sealable plastic bag or wrap them tightly in plastic wrap.
  • Leave them in the freezer for the night.
  • Remove them in the morning

In the morning, don’t be afraid to stick your nose where it normally doesn’t belong. You’ll be pleased to find that the shoe stench is gone.

14. Spray essential oils into your shoes

Essential oils are a big thing for millions around the world. If you’re a fan of essential oils and their natural “super powers,” this essential-oils-for-stinky-shoes treatment will surely appeal to you. Be sure you’re using high-quality essential oils.

  • 1. Grab a small spray bottle. The 2.7-ounce size is ideal.
  • 2. Fill halfway with unscented witch hazel.
  • 3. Add distilled water leaving just a little space at the top of the bottle for these essential oils:

    6 drops peppermint essential oil
    4 drops tea tree oil (aka melaleuca oil)
    2 drops eucalyptus essential oil
    1 drop thyme essential oil

  • 4. Screw the spray top onto the bottle.
  • 5. Shake well.
  • 6. Spray lightly the entire interior of the shoe. Don’t forget the toe box.
  • 7. Place the treated shoes in a sealable plastic bag to heighten effectiveness.
  • 8. Let dry.

Each time you detect offending shoe odor, spray again. Not only will this essential concoction deodorize your shoes, but it also has the power to kill odor-causing bacteria. It might just be the best deodorizing spray you’ve ever tried.

15. Freshen your shoes with tea bags

This home remedy for shoe odor works the same way as the cat litter and wood chips methods. All you need are some stinky shoes and unused tea bags.

Place two or three tea bags inside each shoe. Let stand for several hours or overnight. The dried tea in the bags will absorb that bad odor emanating from your shoes. Simple. Easy. Effective.

16. If all else fails: Spring for new shoes

All the above remedies for smelly shoes have been tested, tried and proven. But if your favorite shoes just don’t respond well to one or more of these methods, it may be time to hang ‘em up for good and buy a new pair. New shoes smell great– for a few days. But then, the creeping bad shoe smell will return. So, keep experimenting with these cures for stinky shoes. The inevitable occasion will arrive when your shoes must come off in public. And this time? You’ll be ready.

So, you think you sweat more than normal? A lot of people worry about whether they perspire a “normal” amount. We get it.

Excessive sweat is embarrassing and can throw a wrench into any social situation. Sweating is good and certainly has its benefits (like preventing heat stroke). But it also comes with a host of humiliating side effects (sweaty pits, sweaty handshakes, sweaty feet, sweaty face, etc…)

Wondering why you might be sweating more than normal? You’re in luck, we’ve compiled a list of the most common sweat triggers and how to avoid them.

8 Things That Can Trigger Unwanted Sweat:

  • 1. Stress
  • 2. Crazy Hormones
  • 3. Your Choice of Food
  • 4. Not Eating Enough Food
  • 5. Your Mood (Excited, Happy, Scared)
  • 6. Social Anxiety
  • 7. Being Physically Fit or Overweight
  • 8. Medications

A lot of different things can cause excessive sweating. But there’s always a reason. Sure, you might have a medical condition, such as primary hyperhidrosis, a sweating disorder that makes you perspire more than the average person. But that’s not as likely as you might think. Hyperhidrosis affects less than 5% of the population. There’s a good chance you just have a random sweat trigger you didn’t know about.

1. You’re Really Stressed Out

What do you do if you randomly start sweating for no apparent reason? Freak out? Yeah, a lot of people do. Well, did you know that freaking out about sweating is probably just making you sweat more?

That’s right. Stress is a HUGE sweat trigger.

If you notice that you’re sweating at a random time, quickly do a mental stress check.

  • Is something upsetting you?
  • Have you been brooding about something for most of the day?
  • Are you worried about something?

If you answered, “yes” to any of these questions, your stress may be to blame for your random bout of nervous sweating.

2. Your Hormones Are In Overdrive

Pregnancy and menopause can really mess with a woman’s hormones. In fact, this hormonal rioting can cause mood swings, odd cravings and … overactive sweat glands.

Have you ever heard a pregnant woman complain about night sweats or hot flashes? Yeah, those mini sweat sessions happen because your hormones are out of whack.

Unfortunately, there’s not a lot you can do to prevent this kind of hormonal sweating (aside from delivering your baby or magically skipping menopause).

Fortunately, both pregnancy and menopause are temporary life phases. When they leave, your hormones will chill out and sweating can return to normal.

Pregnancy and menopause aren’t the only things that screw with your hormones. Puberty and overactive thyroid issues can also lead to belligerent hormones and excessive sweating — especially underarm sweating.

3. You’re Eating Foods That Promote Sweating

The food you eat — and what you drink — could be causing you to sweat excessively. This usually happens when you eat food that’s hard to digest because your body has to work a bit harder, which increases your heart rate and sends signals to your sweat glands telling them to get to work.

Which Foods Cause Severe Sweating?

Red meat can be really hard for your body to digest, so if you’re worried about perspiring a lot during (or right after) a meal, you might want to stay away from burgers and steaks. Instead, choose chicken or fish. And of course, vegetables are always a great option. You should also avoid eating fatty fast foods, white bread, and chocolate. These foods lack the enzymes needed for smooth digestion, which means your body works harder to process them.

This probably doesn’t come as a big shock, but if you’re concerned about profuse sweating you should also avoid spicy, hot food. Yeah, those chili fries you love that are topped with jalapeno peppers are a MAJOR sweat trigger. Spicy foods contain capsaicin — a chemical that tricks your body into thinking your core temperature is rising, causing your sweat glands to kick into action, which causes you to perspire.

If you’ve been cursed with body odor that smells a bit fishy, you might have a condition called trimethylaminuria. It’s a genetic condition that makes it difficult for your body to break down trimethylamine — a chemical compound produced when you digest certain foods such as legumes, eggs, and fish. If this is the case, you should eliminate those foods from your diet and talk to your doctor.

4. You Need to Eat More

Are you hangry? If so, your blood sugar is probably a bit low. And one of the symptoms of low blood sugar is excessive sweat or cold sweats. In particular, the sweat glands along your hairline are affected by low blood sugar. So if you’re feeling a bit moody and sweaty, you really might need to grab a Snickers bar like the commercial says. Other symptoms of low blood sugar include:

  • Dizziness
  • Shakiness
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Blurred vision
  • Slight nausea

5. Your Mood (Extremely happy or scared out of your mind)

Did you know that when you’re happy or scared you sweat? This also happens when you’re doing something that you’re really passionate about (and no we aren’t just talking about sex).

You might have noticed that when you engage in activity that you’re passionate about, your body is all of the sudden covered in a thin layer of glistening sweat. That’s because all of these emotions — happiness, fear, and love — are associated with a slight increase in your body temperature. And of course, when your body temperature rises, your sweat glands go to work.

6. You Have Social Anxiety

If you get nervous before events that require you to socialize with others, you’ve probably noticed that your sweaty spurts also happen about the same time. That’s totally normal if you have social anxiety.

It’s common for people with social anxiety to constantly battle excessive hand sweating. But you can use relaxing techniques to help get you through overly stressful situations or talk to your doctor. There’s a good chance your doctor may be able to prescribe an anti-anxiety medication to help you control nervous bouts of sweating. Another great way to combat nervous sweat is by using a clinical strength antiperspirant like SweatBlock. If you’ve got excessive hand sweating or super sweaty feet, you can try a hand or foot antiperspirant to reduce unwanted sweating. We recommend this one.

7. You’re Really Fit or Overweight

Your physical fitness levels can determine the amount of sweat your body produces. For example, if you’re slightly plump around the middle, your body works harder carrying the excess weight. This causes your heart rate to increase and you to perspire. But people who are really, really fit often sweat a lot too. This is typically caused by sweating a lot when exercising. See, if you exercise regularly, your body gets really good at sweating so it does it more often. Of course, that doesn’t mean you should stop working out. Instead, use a clinical-strength antiperspirant, such as SweatBlock, to control the amount of sweat your body produces.

8. Your Medications Are Causing You to Sweat (Diaphoresis)

Diaphoresis is the medical term used to describe excessive sweating caused by certain medications. Some of the more common culprits include SSRIs, heart medications, and painkillers. But they aren’t the only medications that can make you sweat. So if you’re taking a new prescription and it’s causing heavy sweating randomly, you might want to have a chat with your doctor.

What to Do If Sweat Becomes Excessive

It’s important to remember that perspiration is a normal process. In fact, it’s even good for you to sweat. But if you sweat excessively, you should consider using a clinical-strength antiperspirant or talk to your doctor about treatment options.

How Does Sweating Help the Body?

You have approximately 2.5 million sweat glands on your body (some people have up to 4 million). So what you probably don’t realize is that you’re actually sweating all the time. You just don’t normally notice the sweat because it evaporates quickly. If your body produces sweat faster than it evaporates, it’s noticeable. That’s when excessive sweating can become embarrassing.

But sweating is actually good for you — at least in normal amounts. We sweat to regulate our body temperature. So if you didn’t sweat at all, your body would overheat — and no one wants to have heat stroke. If you think you sweat more than “normal,” you might be right. In this case, you might want to consult your doctor to determine whether you have hyperhidrosis or you have sweat triggers that you don’t know about. Even if you don’t have hyperhidrosis, your doctor will be able to help you determine the best way to keep your sweating in check.

How to Stop Sweating

Remember, you don’t want to stop sweating completely. But you may want to stop sweating in specific areas of your body. For example, if you sweat when you’re nervous, you probably have clammy hands. That can be embarrassing when you meet someone new or you’re on a date and you want to hold hands. If that’s the case, you should be looking for ways to stop sweating on your hands.

Who Treats Excessive Sweating?

If clinical-strength antiperspirants and other home remedies don’t keep you from sweating profusely, you should consult your doctor to see if you have hyperhidrosis. Your primary care doctor can discuss treatment options that can reduce sweating, such as prescription creams and medication, with you, but if the problem is severe, you might be referred to a dermatologist. A dermatologist is a doctor who treats skin conditions specifically. So he or she may discuss more elaborate treatment options, such as Botox, with you.

Ultimately, it’s important to remember that everyone sweats. Because everyone is different, there really isn’t a “normal” amount of sweat your body should produce. But if excessive sweating becomes a problem, makes you feel self-conscious, or keeps you from attending normal social events, you should talk to your doctor or see a dermatologist.

Remember that hat you always used to wear? You know, the one that fit perfectly? The one you always relied on? Maybe it’s the one tucked away on the top shelf or hiding under the bed riddled with sweat stains.

Wanna get rid of those unsightly sweat stains? Here are several ways to remove sweat stains from hats. Choose wisely, depending on what your hat is made of, certain methods will work better than others.

6 Ways to Get Sweat Stains Out of Hats:

  • 1. Hand Washing
  • 2. Dishwasher and Cap Cage (top rack)
  • 3. Spot Treatment
  • 4. Washing Machine
  • 5. Dry Cleaning
  • 6. Enzyme Treatment

Proceed with caution, using the wrong method could destroy your hat … along with any sweat stains. Before moving ahead with any of these hat cleaning methods, verify the following details:

Hat Material: You can usually find manufacturing and material information on the inside of your hat. If there isn’t a tag or it doesn’t specify what the hat is made of, check the manufacturers website for additional details.

Manufacturer Washing Instructions: Washing instructions can also be found on the inside of your hat. Again, if you can’t find any tags indicating washing or manufacturing information, check the manufacturers website.

Is the Hat Colorfast? Before you attempt to wash your hat, find out if it’s colorfast. Moisten a clean, white cloth in lukewarm water and rub it on a hidden part of the hat to see if the dye runs. If some of the colored dye transfers to the rag, don’t completely soak the hat in water as that will ruin it. If the hat’s color doesn’t transfer to the rag, it’s colorfast.

A few other tips to remember:

  • ALWAYS follow recommended washing instructions from manufacturer.
  • Don’t use bleach or detergents that contain bleach.
  • Don’t chuck your hat in the laundry with the rest of your dirty clothes. (trust us, it won’t end well.)
  • Don’t put your hat in the dryer… ever!
  • Don’t put your hat in the dishwasher with dirty dishes.
  • Don’t air dry your hat in direct sunlight.

1. Get Sweat Stains Out of Hats by Hand Washing

We’ll start here as hand washing is truly the best and safest method for removing sweat stains from your hats. Hand washing is particularly useful for hats made of cotton — like baseball caps and golf hats.

IMPORTANT: DO NOT use this method on hats or caps made of felt, leather, silk, wool or satin. For best results, make sure your hat is colorfast.

  • 1. Fill a sink or bucket with warm water. Add 1 tablespoon of powdered or liquid laundry detergent. Be sure to use a bleach-free detergent to avoid fading. Stir mixture until detergent disolved fully into water.
  • 2. Spot treat stains. Before putting your hat in the water/detergent mixture, pre-treat the sweat stains with a spray stain remover like OxiClean or Puracy Natural Stain Remover. If you’ve got some real stubborn stains, try using a soft toothbrush to spot clean.
  • 3. Place the hat in the water and swish it around a few times. Let the hat soak for up to four hours while stirring ocassionaly.
  • 4. Rinse with cool water. After the hat has soaked for several hours, remove from water and rinse with cool water. Rinse until all the soapy water is removed and the water runs clear. Lightly squeeze the hat to remove the excess water. Take care not to ruin its shape.
  • 5. Let the hat air dry. Stuff the wet hat with a rolled-up hand towel and allow the hat to air dry. Drying time can take up to 24 hours or longer depending upon the ambient humidity. Do not air dry the hat in direct sunlight and do not put it in a clothes dryer unless you want it to be several sizes smaller.

2. Use Your Dishwasher to Get Sweat Stains out of Hats

As strange as it may seem, using a dishwasher to remove sweat stains from hats can work in some instances.

IMPORTANT: If the hat is made of cotton, jersey mesh, or a blend of polyester fabrics, the dishwasher method should work. If the hat’s brim is made of cardboard, DO NOT wash it in the dishwasher. Spot clean instead.

Follow these simple steps to get salty sweat stains out of hats using your dishwasher:

  • 1. Use the top rack. It’s vital that you put the hat on the top rack to keep it away from the heating element in the bottom of the machine. Otherwise, you could shrink or warp your beloved cap beyond recognition. For the best possible outcome, use a “cap cage” or “baseball cap rack” to protect the hat’s shape. These can be purchased at many hat stores or from online shopping sites.
  • 2. Use a non-bleach dishwashing detergent. Carefully read the ingredients of the dishwashing detergent you use as chlorine bleaches will permanently alter hat’s color. If sweat stains aren’t too serious, try washing without detergent.
  • 3. Use a cold water washing cycle and deactivate the heated dry option. Use the gentlest cycle your machine offers. Wash the baseball cap or golf hat alone. You don’t want sweaty hat residue on your dishes or last nights lasangna on your hat.
  • 4. Reshape and dry your hat. Once the wash cycle is done, remove the hat. Using your hands, gently reshape the hat and brim if needed. Place it on a towel to air dry. Using a fan will speed up the process. Wait to wear your clean hat until it’s completely dry.

3. Spot Treatment

IMPORTANT: This method works well for leather hats you don’t want to completely soak. Do not try this method on your felt hats, unless you love that greasy stain look.

  • Check for colorfastness.
  • 1. Pretreat affected areas (if needed). If the sweat stains are particularly nasty, try applying a mild stain treatment. As always, make sure you’re not exposing your hat to a bleaching agent such as chlorine.
  • 2. Mix up a mild cleaning solution. Use a small amount of mild detergent (bleach free) or shampoo and mix with cool water in a pail or container. Stir to mix completely.
  • 3. Gently scrub the stain. Using a clean cloth, dip a corner in the cleaning solution you just mixed up. Gently rub it on the stain(s) until gone. Use unused portions of the cloth to wash individual sweat stains. Clean the hat’s sweatband in the same way. White vinegar can also be used to remove sweat stains. Apply 1 tablespoon of white vinegar onto each sweat stain and gently scrub until the stain is gone.
  • 4. Rinse with cool water. After the sweat stains are removed, use a new cloth and cool water to wipe away the soapy cleaning solution. If the hat is made of cotton or other water-safe material, you can use a gentle stream of cool water to rinse. If your sweat-stained hat is made of leather, use a moist sponge to rinse the sweat stains.
  • 5. Air dry your hat without added heat. Let your hat air dry. Don’t dry in direct sunlight and don’t use heating devices (hair dryer or clothes dryer).

4. Cleaning Hat Stains with Washing Machine

While not a recommended first option, a washing machine can be useful in removing sweat stains from some hats.

IMPORTANT: This method should only be used with colorfast ball caps, golf hats or knit hats made of cotton, twill or a washable polyester blend. Do not use the washing machine method if the brim or bill of the hat contains cardboard.

  • 1. Pre-treat with stain remover. If the hat is badly sweat-stained, use a prewash stain removal product. You may want to place the hat in a garment bag if you’re going to wash it with other clothing.
  • 2. Wash hat on gentle, cold cycle. Set the water temperature to cold (never use hot water). Add laundry detergent according to the maker’s instructions. Do not add any bleach and be sure the laundry detergent does not contain bleach (color-safe bleaches may be okay.)
  • 3. Remove hat promptly and air dry. Once the wash cycle is complete, remove the hat and form it with your hands. Allow it to air dry completely. Do not place the hat in the dryer or use any means of heated drying.

5. Dry Cleaning Sweat-Stained Hats

Some sweat-stained hats can be damaged with water-based cleaning methods. Felt hats, top hats and fedoras, for example, do not take well to water.

It’s not recommended to dry clean top hats or fedoras. Hats made of felt, like cowboy hats, can be dry cleaned to remove salty sweat stains. They will likely need to be reblocked after cleaning to restore their shape. Be sure the dry cleaner you choose has experience dry cleaning hats.

If you have a dress hat that needs to have sweat stains removed, take it to a hatter, a haberdasher or a Western wear store. Specialized treatments will be needed to remove the sweat stains from dress hats.

While baseball caps and similar style caps can be dry cleaned to remove sweat stains, it’s often not worth the cost.

6. Enzyme Treatment for Hat Sweat Stains

  • 1. Mix warm water with an enzyme-based cleaner like those used to clean pet urine. These can be found online or in retail stores. Fully dissolve the enzyme cleaner.
  • 2. Soak. Soak your cotton or polyester blend hat in the mixture for 20 minutes. It may take an hour or two if the stain is stubborn.
  • 3. Wash. Hand wash the hat or place in your washing machine as instructed above.

Sometimes you need a little more help, like if the stains are particularly stubborn or if the hat is white. Here are some tips to help in these cases.

How to get stubborn sweat stains out the hats

Some sweat stains are just plain stubborn and won’t come out with any of the methods we’ve covered so far. To get stubborn sweat stains out of hats, try the following method using baking soda.

  • 1. Make a sweat stain removal paste. Put four tablespoons of baking soda in a small bowl or container. Mix in warm water and stir until all the baking soda is moist and a paste is formed.
  • 2. Apply the paste to the stain. Dab some of the paste on the sweat-stained hat with a spoon. Using a clean soft bristle toothbrush, scrub the baking soda mixture into the stained area. Allow the paste to soak in for several minutes, up to an hour.
  • 3. Rinse the baking soda paste away. Once the clock has ticked away 60 minutes, rinse the paste away with a stream of cool water. Rinse until all the baking soda has been removed.
  • 4. Air dry the hat. Stuff a small clean towel into the hat to absorb excess moisture. Let the hat air dry completely. A fan or open window can shorten the drying time. Do not put the hat in a clothes dryer or in direct sunshine.

How to get sweat stains out of white hats

White hats stained with yellow sweat stains can be especially difficult to clean. But all is not lost. Using hydrogen peroxide you can salvage that pristine look. Be aware: Hydrogen peroxide is a powerful bleaching agent. Use cautiously.

  • 1. Carefully drip a few drops of hydrogen peroxide onto the yellow stains on the brim of the hat.
  • 2. Gently scrub the stain with a clean, soft bristle toothbrush.
  • 3. Let the hydrogen peroxide soak each stain for about 10 minutes.
  • 4. Using cool water rinse away the hydrogen peroxide and allow the hat to air dry.
  • 5. If the hat is washable, you may want to wash it by hand or use one of the other methods described above. Do not use hydrogen peroxide on colored hats.

How to Prevent Sweat Stains in Hats

The best way to get rid of sweat stains in your hat is to avoid them altogether. That’s easier said than done. We all sweat and sweat even more when wearing a hat. But there are some things you can do to prevent sweat from ruining your favorite hats.

Tips to preventing sweat stains in your hats and caps:

Sweat Less

Sweating can occur for a number of reasons: heat, stress, anxiety, diet, physical activity, etc… If you can prevent or reduce the sweating in the first place, you can cut down on the sweat stains.
Pssst… here’s a few tips to prevent unwanted sweat.

Hat Saver Spray

This hat spray treatment repels sweat and oils from your head. Just spray on your hat and let it dry for 15 minutes. It can keep sweat stains away and keep your hats looking new.

Hat & Cap Liners

Hat liners go on the inside of your hat and create a barrier between your head and the hat. The liner prevents sweat stains by absorbing the sweat instead of your favorite hat.

Face/Forehead Antiperspirant

Prevent the sweat and you can prevent the sweat stain. If you suffer from profuse face or forehead sweating, you may want to try a facial antiperspirant to reduce sweating.

Have you ever wondered why your favorite foods are often followed by an unexplained PDES? (Public Display of Excessive Sweating).

Soggy armpits and sweaty palms are just a few of the places this inconvenient sweat might rear it’s ugly head.

Here’s the deal… your diet affects your health, physique, skin complexion, and yes… even how much you sweat.

There are foods that will lead to profuse sweating and other foods that help tame overactive sweat glands.

In this article we’ll explore common foods that trigger embarrassing sweat and how to control it.

We’re not oblivious to the fact that a lot of these foods are delicious, convenient, and hard to avoid. If you’re not ready to give them up, use a clinical strength antiperspirant to keep heavy sweating under control.

Why We Sweat After We Eat

Gustatory sweating is the sheen of perspiration you get when eating or even just thinking about food. It can leave you in a sweat puddle faster than you can say, “Hold the jalapenos.”

If you eat enough of anything – except maybe celery or cucumbers – you’ll eventually start to sweat. That’s the thermic effect of eating food, also called “thermogenesis” or the “thermogenic effect.” But some foods have higher thermogenic effects than others, which makes your body produce more heat (sweat) during or soon after eating.

This can be for a number of reasons:

  • Your body is working overtime to digest fat, carbs, sugar or protein – or just a lot of calories.
  • Your nervous system is being overstimulated.
  • Your body is flushing excess compounds formed during digestion.
  • Your brain is chemically fooled into thinking your core temperature is too high.
  • Your heart rate is elevated and your blood vessels are expanded (vasodilation).
  • You’re experiencing a true increase in body temperature.

Is Sweating After Eating Normal?

Yes, usually. All of the reasons listed above are normal and not a cause for concern. Also keep in mind that there are lots of factors that can trigger excessive sweating – and many times they work together. If you can isolate your triggers, that can help.

What About Excessive Sweating on the Head, Neck and Face While Eating?

Let’s face it (ha!) – this kind of sweating is tough to deal with. In fact, many people battling excessive sweating have the hardest time coping with sweat on their face or neck — mostly because it’s nearly impossible to hide at the dinner table.

Some medical conditions, such as diabetes or chronic heart conditions, can cause you to sweat on the head, neck or face. If you are sure you don’t suffer from these conditions, your excessive head, neck or face sweating could relate to your diet.

The good news is that for head, face and neck sweating, an antiperspirant like SweatBlock can be really effective. It might sound weird, but it really does work. Before going to bed, wipe down your face and neck with a SweatBlock towelette, which will do its magic while you sleep, when your sweat glands aren’t as active. One nighttime treatment should be enough to reduce excessive sweating for four to seven days, but you can also carry a SweatBlock towelette with you — just in case.

You can also carry alcohol wipes to use in an emergency. If a situation pops up that calls for eating Kung Pao Chicken, quickly wiping down your face with an alcohol wipe can close your pores so the sweat can’t pour.

These tips on how to stop face sweating can also be helpful.

10 Foods That Will Make You Sweat

For your convenience we’ve put together list of the most common foods and food types that will lead to embarrassing sweat.

1. Processed, Fatty Foods

These snacks and treats are low in fiber and lack enzymes your body needs for digestion, so your body works twice as hard to process them. Some of the worst offenders? Chocolate, white bread and fast food. When your body works this hard, you can look forward to sweating profusely. Think of it like running a 5K – complete with rapid heart rate and sweating, but without the toned glutes and calves.

2. Sugar and High-Carb Foods

Some people report sweating after eating sugar, sweating after eating carbs, or sweating after eating a heavy meal. These calorie-filled options have high thermic effects in general, so it’s not uncommon for them to trigger a sweaty dining experience.

It’s more rare, but some people also can experience an insulin spike that drives blood sugar dangerously low after eating sugar or carbs. Symptoms include sweating, dizziness, fatigue and or perhaps you feel light-headed after eating. If you have any of these symptoms you should be checked out by a doctor.

3. Caffeine

Your morning espresso is good for more than a wake-up jolt – it can also fire up those sweat glands. Caffeine stimulates your central nervous system, increases your heart rate and raises blood pressure, all while cranking out the sweat. Basically, your body responds to caffeine like it would respond to a grizzly in the kitchen – you’re in fight-or-flight mode. And coffee can be a double-edged sword, because unless you take your java iced, you get the caffeine stimulation plus the extra temperature from the hot liquid that naturally triggers your internal fire alarm and heart palpitations.

4. Too Much Salt

Consuming too much sodium forces your body to dispose of the excess through your urine and skin – which, you guessed it, makes you sweat. Cutting down on salty snacks can reduce excessive sweating after eating, and this one seems like an easy place to start. Most Americans consume about 12 grams of sodium daily compared to the recommended 4 grams.

5. Spicy Foods

Didn’t see that coming, did you? But why, why, why all the perspiring after dining on the most delicious spicy foods? My stomach wants the spicy food, but my sweaty scalp is begging me to stay away. Short answer: Capsaicin. This chemical fools your brain into thinking your core body temperature is rising. The mouthwatering food triggers your parotid gland and the false alarm goes off triggering your sweat glands (your body’s cooling system). Here come the water works, just like your office sprinklers going off when someone lights a match. To prevent hot flashes and other excessive sweating, watch out for some of the worst offenders:

  • General Tso’s Chicken
  • Spicy Curries
  • Spicy Hot Wings
  • Wasabi
  • Hot Peppers

6. Alcohol

If you routinely down a few beers, cocktails or glasses of wine, you may find yourself feeling light-headed, sweating profusely or even waking up with night sweats. Alcohol does a lot of fun things to the body, but it also has some unpleasant effects – like increasing your heart rate and dilating the blood vessels in your skin. Sure enough, then your body heat increases and your natural cooling system – aka excessive sweating – kicks in. As your blood vessels widen (vasodilation), your pores also enlarge, making it easy for sweat to flow.

7. Ice Cream

It’s true – that cold, beloved treat on the hottest of days will betray you. The high levels of fat in your favorite scoop can actually heat up your internal thermostat. Remember the warning above about fatty foods and increased blood glucose from sugary foods?

8. Hot Foods and Beverages

Hot coffee, tea and soups, along with the steam that’s coming from your mug or bowl, can also rev up the sweat glands. Your body will do everything in its power to cool you down while you slurp. And if the soup you’re sipping happens also to be spicy, get ready for a double sweat whammy.

9. Onions and Garlic

So many health benefits… and so much sweat. Onions and garlic – and really any foods high in Vitamin B – can lead to excessive sweating. B vitamins raise the body’s internal temperature, which (surprise!) can make you sweat more than usual. Plus, the aroma from a garlic- or onion-induced sweat can curl your toes.

10. Protein ( Meat Sweats )

High consumption of protein causes the body to dispose of urea (a substance formed as your body breaks down protein) through – you guessed it – excessive sweating. Think back to the thermogenic effect: High protein foods give up at least 25 percent of their energy content as heat, which means that for every four bites of that scrumptious steak, an entire bite radiates from your body as pure heat – or pure sweat.

11. Smoking

As if the risk of emphysema and lung cancer weren’t enough, smoking can also lead to excessive perspiration. As nicotine is ingested, it causes the body to release acetylcholine. This raises the heart rate, increases body temperature and stimulates the sweat glands. You know the rest.

How to Stop Sweating After Eating

Rest assured, you don’t have to resort to a constant juice and water fast to prevent excessive perspiring after eating. If you are serious about controlling your excessive sweat, try some of these simple diet and lifestyle changes.

Fight Food With Food

Not every delicious food triggers a sweat storm. Here are a few foods that can actually help reduce excessive sweating:

Water

It might seem weird to add water to a sweat-fest, but keeping your body cool will keep it from working so hard to lower your internal temperature by sweating. So drink up!

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

These healthy foods help because of their high water content and digestive power. Some of the best are:

  • Grapes
  • Watermelon
  • Red cabbage
  • Peppers
  • Spinach
  • Broccoli

Olive Oil

Olive oil is a metabolism and digestion superhero. It can prevent surges in body temperature and the profuse sweating that follows. Try using it instead of vegetable or canola oil – or even butter. Other side effects include healthy blood pressure and lower cholesterol – so you’re winning either way.

Low-Fat or Skim Milk

Just like ice cream, that tasty whole milk you use on your morning cereal can turn up the heat. Swap it out for skim milk and enjoy the drop in temperature.

Oats

Your body can digest oats quickly because they’re rich in fiber and low in fat. You’re not working as hard, so you don’t need to sweat buckets to cool back down.

Bananas

With a powerful kick of potassium, bananas actually help you hydrate (potassium is an electrolyte). And good hydration means less excessive sweating. Winning!

Green Tea

Known for its calming effects, green tea can be a great meal addition that keeps your nervous system (and sweat) at bay.

Overall, one of the best things you can do is make sure you eat a balanced diet that includes essential nutrients and vitamins. Try substituting some of these foods or at least eating them in combination with your spicier, fattier favorites.

Studies show that a regular exercise routine can help regulate body temperature, too (Sorry – had to throw in that bit about exercise). 

When All Else Fails: Arm Yourself with a Strong Antiperspirant

Life – and great food – happens. You can’t avoid every potentially sweaty situation. But you can fight excessive sweating after eating by using a clinical strength antiperspirant like SweatBlock. Unlike deodorants that simply mask odor, antiperspirants have the ability to actually block sweat. Applying antiperspirant to clean, dry skin before going to bed can help you absorb it better.

Bottom Line: Can I Control Excessive Sweating After Eating?

Most of the time, yes, and it can be addressed using some of the tips here. We all sweat, and nearly everyone has started to perspire after eating something – whether it be spicy food or just something that doesn’t agree with us.

But if you find yourself sweating excessively after every meal, no matter what you eat or what tips you try, you should probably visit with your doctor to make sure you’re not dealing with an underlying health condition, such as diabetes or Frey’s Syndrome.

The fact is, excessive sweating after eating isn’t appetizing, and can be really embarrassing too. But with a combination of clinical-strength antiperspirants, such as SweatBlock, and your doctor’s recommendations, you can rein in eating-induced hyperhidrosis and get back to enjoying your feasts.

With all the women’s antiperspirant brands out there, it can be difficult find the one that works best for you.

If you sweat more than the average woman, then you already know that some of these so-called “best antiperspirants for women” hardly work at all!

You’ve tried different deodorants and other solutions. And while some of them may smell nicer than others, nothing seems to truly provide sweat relief, right?

This is why you need to be a little more prudent when trying to find the best antiperspirant. Here’s a few things to consider when choosing the best antiperspirant for you.

What’s the Best Women’s Antiperspirant? 6 Things to Consider

1) Do You Want to Stop Sweat or Stop Body Odor?

What do you actually want to do? Stop sweaty underarms or get rid of stinky armpits? Or both? It’s important to get clear on your goal. Many women would say “both”. Others might just want to cover up body odor or stop embarrassing sweat stains. Here’s the thing, antiperspirant will control sweat, deodorant will mask body foul odor. Understanding the differences between antiperspirant and deodorant will help you figure out the best solution for you.

Do you want to stop excessive sweating? Choose a strong antiperspirant. If you’re just trying get through the day without smelling like a jungle woman, go with your favorite women’s deodorant. But honestly, using deodorant and antiperspirant will get you the best results (staying dry, smelling fresh).

Here’s a little tip: Apply antiperspirant at night to clean, dry armpits. Then apply your deodorant the following morning. This trick will keep your underarms dry and odor free throughout the day. Antiperspirant deodorant combos aren’t nearly as effective as applying the two separately.

2) What is the active ingredient?

The first important step to finding the best antiperspirant for women is to eliminate all the options that are NOT true antiperspirants. This includes all the deodorants that are designed to merely mask the scent of body odor.

A true antiperspirant uses active ingredients like aluminum chloride that can block sweat. When considering antiperspirant options, look for something that has at least 12% Aluminum chloride. This will give you the best chance at stopping unwanted sweat.

Whats the most effective antiperspirant for women? Honestly, the best antiperspirants will work for both men and women. Men and women both have sweat glands that operate on the same set of biological rules. Stress, high temperatures, physical activity, or hyperhidrosis will make anyone sweat… regardless of gender.

3) Does it work? Is it highly rated/recommended?

Thanks to Amazon, Facebook, and other social platforms – we can learn quickly what products work and which ones don’t. Do a quick search on Amazon or Google and you’ll find thousands of reviews for antiperspirants.

Choose an antiperspirant that has a high number of customer reviews and no lower than a 4 out 5 star rating. This means that the antiperspirant has been tested on a large scale and the results are reliable. A 5-star antiperspirant with 3 customer reviews should probably be avoided.

When comparing antiperspirants, take the time to look for feedback from customers who have tried the product first-hand. Read some of the good reviews and read some of the bad. Not every product works for everyone. But reading reviews can help you get an idea of who is using the product and how they get the best results.

4) Is it safe?

You want to be sure that the antiperspirant you’re applying to your skin is safe to use – regardless of what the manufacturer claims. Do your homework to find out if the product has been independently evaluated and recommended by prominent medical professionals. Look for antiperspirants that have been FDA approved or use FDA approved formulas.

5) Does it have a money-back guarantee?

There’s no reason why you should be wasting money endlessly on antiperspirants. Stick to products that offer a money-back guarantee.

This not only ensures that you’ll get a refund if you’re not satisfied by the results, but also, it’s a sign that the manufacturer stands by the quality of its product and cares about its customers.

6) Is it strong enough for extreme sweating?

If you suffer from excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis), traditional drug store antiperspirant just won’t cut it.

Nobody understands the embarrassment of sweating more than hyperhidrosis sufferers. Women (and men) with this condition sweat profusely regardless of physical activity or emotional state. The sweat just comes… and most of the time it comes without warning or explanation.

If you suffer from hyperhidrosis, you need a strong antiperspirant. SweatBlock clinical strength antiperspirant was tested on the Rachael Ray show. It had no problem stopping sweat for firefighters, yet it continues to be a popular antiperspirant choice for women.

Here’s just a few of the reviews from women who use SweatBlock:

The best antiperspirant I’ve ever ordered from Amazon – Cristina

“I just got SweatBlock the other day and it has already been life-changing. I always sweat through my clothes, can’t tell you how many shirts I’ve ruined. The biggest problem I have is work clothes – those silk type button up shirts from express, nice blouses, dresses, etc…always ruined or just embarrassing walking around with sweat stains. I keep a fan on at work, and always wear a sweater to hide my sweat, or I’m running into the bathroom to try to dry up with paper towels. I tried a “life hack” I read and tried sticking panty liners in my shirts for awhile…but once they got wet they’d just fall off (even more embarrassing than sweat stains are random wet panty linters falling out of your shirt).”

“I actually stumbled across SweatBlock because I was looking for the sweat guards you can sew into your clothes for a more permanent solution. I read the glowing reviews on this product and since I have prime I was able to get it the next day so I figured I’d try this first. I followed the directions and dabbed one of the pads in my armpits. I made sure to dab the whole area and get the sides, a little on my back – just everywhere in that area where I sweat. I let it dry while I brushed my teeth, and put on a sweatshirt and laid down in bed to read a book. I woke up the next morning thinking I had screwed it up because usually when I accidentally fall asleep in a sweatshirt I sweat all night. I was pleasantly surprised when I noticed my sweatshirt wasn’t wet! I went to work that morning in a sweater I usually sweat through and didn’t have any issues all day! I was SHOCKED. The armpit areas of this sweater always get soaked but I’m able to hide it by keeping my arms down. I couldn’t believe I didn’t have to do that this time.”

Sweat, I Banish You! – Shannon

“I have been using SweatBlock for about a month now. The results of this product have exceeded my expectations. I have been living my life as an excessive sweater since middle school. I would always wear sweatshirts to cover up my sweat stains and learned to accept this uncomfortable feeling physically and emotionally. Entering my career in an office setting gave me anxiety because I knew dressing professionally would mean that I would not be able to wear what I want, or suffer the consequences of embarrassing sweat stains. All the money I spent on clothes that were quickly ruined by yellow deodorant stains were costing me a fortune. All the time I spent in the bathroom trying to dry my shirts was affecting my productivity at work. I couldn’t even go to a meeting or have a conversation with my boss, a coworker, or a client with out sweat running down my arms. I had enough! I was researching getting Botox injections to help with my excessive sweating when I came across SweatBlock. I figured I would give it a try as my last resort option.”

“The first week I used the product I was applying it every night after the first 3 or 4 days. I used the same wipe for 3 applications. I was still sweating but not as much. I ordered a Thompson Tee thinking I would still need some extra protection. I started applying Certain DRI as my normal deodorant in the morning. THE SWEAT STOPPED! I returned that Thompson Tee without having to wear it once! I have regained my confidence in the workplace even in the most stressful of situations. I am not constantly thinking about how I move my arms and trying to hide my sweat stains. I can buy clothes and not worry about having to throw them out within in a month because of yellow deodorant stains.”

This Product is Amazing! – Lorena

“This product is amazing! I was diagnosed with hyperhidrosis when i was 16 and nothing worked i thought i would give this a shot. To my surprise i applied it as directed with much doubt but it works! I did not have to reapply (i thought as much as i sweat i would surely have to reapply more than the directed once a week) but its working. Im in shock that finally at 37 years old i can wear what i want raise my arms, its so freeing.”

SweatBlock literally changed my life – Kim

“I had tried everything- prescription antiperspirant, prescription medications, natural products, bulky stick on sweat pads, and clinical strength products. Nothing really worked and I had just resigned myself to picking clothes based on whether they would hide my sweat stains. A friend recommended SweatBlock, and I figured I didn’t have anything to lose. It is amazing! I immediately had a significant reduction in perspiration and was even able to wear a light color shirt for the first time in years! I have been a loyal user ever since and recommend it to everyone.”

SweatBlock has worked wonders! – Emi

“I was never a big sweater, but once I got laser hair removal on my armpits , I was like a POOL under there. Sweaty, smelly, all things I never experienced before! So of course, I googled for a remedy that wasn’t Botox and I came across Sweat Block! My order came VERY quickly and I’ve been using it for two weeks now and, I have to say, they work! I work out a few times a week and do hip hop and Zumba and, even though I may still sweat, there’s really NO SMELL! Nothing is going to stop you from sweating fully unless you do something invasive, but Sweat Block really has worked wonders for me and I’m grateful. I’m on my 3rd box !! Highly recommend.”