Tips, Tools and Tricks to beat unwanted, embarrassing sweat.

With all the women’s antiperspirant brands out there, it can be difficult find the one that works best for you.

If you sweat more than the average woman, then you already know that some of these so-called “best antiperspirants for women” hardly work at all!

You’ve tried different deodorants and other solutions. And while some of them may smell nicer than others, nothing seems to truly provide sweat relief, right?

This is why you need to be a little more prudent when trying to find the best antiperspirant. Here’s a few things to consider when choosing the best antiperspirant for you.

What’s the Best Women’s Antiperspirant? 6 Things to Consider

1) Do You Want to Stop Sweat or Stop Body Odor?

What do you actually want to do? Stop sweaty underarms or get rid of stinky armpits? Or both? It’s important to get clear on your goal. Many women would say “both”. Others might just want to cover up body odor or stop embarrassing sweat stains. Here’s the thing, antiperspirant will control sweat, deodorant will mask body foul odor. Understanding the differences between antiperspirant and deodorant will help you figure out the best solution for you.

Do you want to stop excessive sweating? Choose a strong antiperspirant. If you’re just trying get through the day without smelling like a jungle woman, go with your favorite women’s deodorant. But honestly, using deodorant and antiperspirant will get you the best results (staying dry, smelling fresh).

Here’s a little tip: Apply antiperspirant at night to clean, dry armpits. Then apply your deodorant the following morning. This trick will keep your underarms dry and odor free throughout the day. Antiperspirant deodorant combos aren’t nearly as effective as applying the two separately.

2) What is the active ingredient?

The first important step to finding the best antiperspirant for women is to eliminate all the options that are NOT true antiperspirants. This includes all the deodorants that are designed to merely mask the scent of body odor.

A true antiperspirant uses active ingredients like aluminum chloride that can block sweat. When considering antiperspirant options, look for something that has at least 12% Aluminum chloride. This will give you the best chance at stopping unwanted sweat.

Whats the most effective antiperspirant for women? Honestly, the best antiperspirants will work for both men and women. Men and women both have sweat glands that operate on the same set of biological rules. Stress, high temperatures, physical activity, or hyperhidrosis will make anyone sweat… regardless of gender.

3) Does it work? Is it highly rated/recommended?

Thanks to Amazon, Facebook, and other social platforms – we can learn quickly what products work and which ones don’t. Do a quick search on Amazon or Google and you’ll find thousands of reviews for antiperspirants.

Choose an antiperspirant that has a high number of customer reviews and no lower than a 4 out 5 star rating. This means that the antiperspirant has been tested on a large scale and the results are reliable. A 5-star antiperspirant with 3 customer reviews should probably be avoided.

When comparing antiperspirants, take the time to look for feedback from customers who have tried the product first-hand. Read some of the good reviews and read some of the bad. Not every product works for everyone. But reading reviews can help you get an idea of who is using the product and how they get the best results.

4) Is it safe?

You want to be sure that the antiperspirant you’re applying to your skin is safe to use – regardless of what the manufacturer claims. Do your homework to find out if the product has been independently evaluated and recommended by prominent medical professionals. Look for antiperspirants that have been FDA approved or use FDA approved formulas.

5) Does it have a money-back guarantee?

There’s no reason why you should be wasting money endlessly on antiperspirants. Stick to products that offer a money-back guarantee.

This not only ensures that you’ll get a refund if you’re not satisfied by the results, but also, it’s a sign that the manufacturer stands by the quality of its product and cares about its customers.

6) Is it strong enough for extreme sweating?

If you suffer from excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis), traditional drug store antiperspirant just won’t cut it.

Nobody understands the embarrassment of sweating more than hyperhidrosis sufferers. Women (and men) with this condition sweat profusely regardless of physical activity or emotional state. The sweat just comes… and most of the time it comes without warning or explanation.

If you suffer from hyperhidrosis, you need a strong antiperspirant. SweatBlock clinical strength antiperspirant was tested on the Rachael Ray show. It had no problem stopping sweat for firefighters, yet it continues to be a popular antiperspirant choice for women.

Here’s just a few of the reviews from women who use SweatBlock:

The best antiperspirant I’ve ever ordered from Amazon – Cristina

“I just got SweatBlock the other day and it has already been life-changing. I always sweat through my clothes, can’t tell you how many shirts I’ve ruined. The biggest problem I have is work clothes – those silk type button up shirts from express, nice blouses, dresses, etc…always ruined or just embarrassing walking around with sweat stains. I keep a fan on at work, and always wear a sweater to hide my sweat, or I’m running into the bathroom to try to dry up with paper towels. I tried a “life hack” I read and tried sticking panty liners in my shirts for awhile…but once they got wet they’d just fall off (even more embarrassing than sweat stains are random wet panty linters falling out of your shirt).”

“I actually stumbled across SweatBlock because I was looking for the sweat guards you can sew into your clothes for a more permanent solution. I read the glowing reviews on this product and since I have prime I was able to get it the next day so I figured I’d try this first. I followed the directions and dabbed one of the pads in my armpits. I made sure to dab the whole area and get the sides, a little on my back – just everywhere in that area where I sweat. I let it dry while I brushed my teeth, and put on a sweatshirt and laid down in bed to read a book. I woke up the next morning thinking I had screwed it up because usually when I accidentally fall asleep in a sweatshirt I sweat all night. I was pleasantly surprised when I noticed my sweatshirt wasn’t wet! I went to work that morning in a sweater I usually sweat through and didn’t have any issues all day! I was SHOCKED. The armpit areas of this sweater always get soaked but I’m able to hide it by keeping my arms down. I couldn’t believe I didn’t have to do that this time.”

Sweat, I Banish You! – Shannon

“I have been using SweatBlock for about a month now. The results of this product have exceeded my expectations. I have been living my life as an excessive sweater since middle school. I would always wear sweatshirts to cover up my sweat stains and learned to accept this uncomfortable feeling physically and emotionally. Entering my career in an office setting gave me anxiety because I knew dressing professionally would mean that I would not be able to wear what I want, or suffer the consequences of embarrassing sweat stains. All the money I spent on clothes that were quickly ruined by yellow deodorant stains were costing me a fortune. All the time I spent in the bathroom trying to dry my shirts was affecting my productivity at work. I couldn’t even go to a meeting or have a conversation with my boss, a coworker, or a client with out sweat running down my arms. I had enough! I was researching getting Botox injections to help with my excessive sweating when I came across SweatBlock. I figured I would give it a try as my last resort option.”

“The first week I used the product I was applying it every night after the first 3 or 4 days. I used the same wipe for 3 applications. I was still sweating but not as much. I ordered a Thompson Tee thinking I would still need some extra protection. I started applying Certain DRI as my normal deodorant in the morning. THE SWEAT STOPPED! I returned that Thompson Tee without having to wear it once! I have regained my confidence in the workplace even in the most stressful of situations. I am not constantly thinking about how I move my arms and trying to hide my sweat stains. I can buy clothes and not worry about having to throw them out within in a month because of yellow deodorant stains.”

This Product is Amazing! – Lorena

“This product is amazing! I was diagnosed with hyperhidrosis when i was 16 and nothing worked i thought i would give this a shot. To my surprise i applied it as directed with much doubt but it works! I did not have to reapply (i thought as much as i sweat i would surely have to reapply more than the directed once a week) but its working. Im in shock that finally at 37 years old i can wear what i want raise my arms, its so freeing.”

SweatBlock literally changed my life – Kim

“I had tried everything- prescription antiperspirant, prescription medications, natural products, bulky stick on sweat pads, and clinical strength products. Nothing really worked and I had just resigned myself to picking clothes based on whether they would hide my sweat stains. A friend recommended SweatBlock, and I figured I didn’t have anything to lose. It is amazing! I immediately had a significant reduction in perspiration and was even able to wear a light color shirt for the first time in years! I have been a loyal user ever since and recommend it to everyone.”

SweatBlock has worked wonders! – Emi

“I was never a big sweater, but once I got laser hair removal on my armpits , I was like a POOL under there. Sweaty, smelly, all things I never experienced before! So of course, I googled for a remedy that wasn’t Botox and I came across Sweat Block! My order came VERY quickly and I’ve been using it for two weeks now and, I have to say, they work! I work out a few times a week and do hip hop and Zumba and, even though I may still sweat, there’s really NO SMELL! Nothing is going to stop you from sweating fully unless you do something invasive, but Sweat Block really has worked wonders for me and I’m grateful. I’m on my 3rd box !! Highly recommend.”

There are 4-5 million sweat glands on the human body. Over 250,000 of those sweat glands reside on your feet. It’s no surprise that sweat and stink find their way between your toes and in your tennis shoes.

We’re not gonna to mince words here. Smelly, sweaty feet can be as embarrassing as public flatulence. Sure, stinky feet may not be as audible. But unlike an untimely “break of wind”, that silent –yet deadly– sweaty foot smell doesn’t fade.

The smell, slipping, sliding, blisters and infection are just a few of the side effects of sweaty feet. For those who suffer with plantar hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating of the feet), things only get worse.

How to Stop Sweaty Feet

If you’re tired of soggy socks and toe-curling foot odor, we’ve got some tips to help you stop the sweat and stink. For your convenience, we’ve divided these tips into three categories: Prevention, Home Remedies, and Treatments.

Tips to Prevent Sweaty Feet (and stinky feet)

1. Wash your feet daily

Wash your feet daily with an antibacterial soap. Dirty, sweaty feet attract bacteria which can lead to foot odor.

2. Use Antiperspirant for Feet

With all those sweat glands hanging out on your feet, sweat can come fast and furious. A strong foot antiperspirant is one of the best ways to stop unwanted sweating.

3. Use a Foot Deodorant Spray

You put deodorant in you armpits to stop smell. Why not do the same with your feet? A deodorizing foot spray like Right Foot or Lumi Outdoors can de-stink your feet and your shoes.

4. Use Foot Powder to Keep Feet Dry & Fungus Free

After cleaning your feet, apply an anti-fungal foot powder. This will help reduce wetness from sweat and control foot odor.

5. Use an Alcohol Wipe Reduce Sweating

Wipe down your feet with an alcohol wipe to close up your pores and reduce sweating temporarily. Do this before you put on your socks and shoes for the day.

6. Use Cornstarch to Absorb Sweat and Keep Feet Dry

Like foot powders, cornstarch can absorb sweat and keep your feet dry and comfortable. Sprinkle clean feet with cornstarch and let sit for a few minutes before putting on shoes and socks.

7. Put Baking Soda in Your Shoes

After you remove your shoes, put some baking soda in them to soak up excess moisture. This prevents nasty smelling bacteria from festering.

8. Choose the Right Shoes

Wear breathable shoes if possible. Shoes with poor ventilation won’t do your sweaty feet any favors. Avoid plastic and leather shoes. And … always wear socks. (but never with sandals. PLEASE!)

9. Keep Shoes Dry to Prevent Bacteria Build-up

Alternate shoes to give them time to dry out. Dry shoes are less likely to be stinky shoes.

10. Wear Socks, Wear the Right Socks

If you’re wearing closed toe-shoes, you need to wear socks — clean, dry, socks. Change your socks daily and avoid wearing cotton socks. The best socks for sweaty feet are going to be breathable, moisture-wicking socks. Wool, bamboo, and anti-bacterial materials are all good options for preventing sweaty feet.

Home Remedies for Sweaty Feet

Even if you’re just looking for a smelly feet cure, it’s important to remember that sweat leads to bacteria … which leads to stink.

11. Diet and Exercise

Eating a healthy diet and avoiding spicy, processed, fatty foods can help reduce sweating. More water and less coffee (or caffeine) can also help.

Foot sweating is largerly influenced by emotional stress. So, keeping stress to a minimum is in your best interest. Regular exercise and relaxation techniques can help manage stress before it turns into pools of sweat in your shoes.

12. Soaking Feet in Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is a great home remedy for sweaty feet and stinky feet. It’s a natural astringent (tightens skin and closes pores) which can help reduce sweat — just like an antiperspirant. But it also keeps foot odor away with its antifungal and antibacterial properties.

Use a cotton ball to apply the vinegar to problem areas of your feet or you can do an apple cider vinegar soak. Mix 1 part apple cider vinegar, 1 part water, and 1/2 part baking soda in a large bowl or basin. Then soak for your feet for 15-20 minutes. This also works for sweaty hands.

13. Soaking Feet in Tea (Black or Sage Tea)

Like apple cider vinegar, black and sage tea are natural astringents. Many people claim that sage tea is one of the best remedies for sweaty feet and sweaty hands.

Just add 4 – 5 tea bags to a quart of boiling water. Once cooled, soak your feet for 15-20 minutes. Some report that drinking the tea can also be helpful in combating foot sweat.

14. Exfoliate Feet

This is more of a stinky feet remedy. Exfoliation is the process of removing dead skin cells from your body. Odor causing bacteria love to feed on these dead skin cells. Use an exfoliating brush or glove on your feet 2-3 times a week to help keep bacteria away.

15. Lemon Juice

Use cotton balls to apply fresh lemon juice to the soles of your feet before putting on your shoes and socks. It helps to close your pores and prevent sweating. Lemon juice can also work as a natural deodorant.

Sweaty Feet Treatment Options

16. Prescription Strength Antiperspirant

Clinical strength antiperspirants can be very effective in treating hand and foot sweating. Antiperspirant works by plugging up your pores and blocking sweat. By blocking the sweat, it can also prevent bad foot odor.

17. Iontophoresis Treatment

If antiperspirant doesn’t stop foot perspiration, Iontophoresis might be a good option. It’s been used for over 50 years to treat excessive sweating of the hands and feet. Iontophoresis works by using electrical currents to drive medication into the skin surface. It’s similar to an injection, but without the needles. Iontophoresis machines can be purchased and used in home. (cost ranges from $300-$1000)

18. Botox Injections (Botulinum Toxin)

Botox injections temporarily block the chemicals that activate the nerves that cause sweating. Affected areas of your feet will receive enough injections to ensure that all the nerves have been treated. The desired effects will last 3-4 months. Then treatments must be repeated. Botox injections for plantar hyperhidrosis (excessive foot sweating) can be very painful.

What Causes Sweaty Feet?

Sweating is an essential part of our body’s cooling system. To regulate body temperature, the body releases excess heat via sweat glands in the form of sweat. Our feet are not exempt from this process.

In fact, our feet have more sweat glands per inch than any other part of the body. That’s over 250,000 sweat glands on just your feet. The feet alone will produce roughly half a pint of sweat daily.

So, even if you don’t have an extreme sweating problem, you’ll likely still sweat quite a bit on your feet.

But there are things that can cause more-than-normal sweating on your feet. Your genes, for example, could be the main reason you sweat more than normal (thanks a lot mom and dad).

Your shoes, socks, diet, and emotional stress levels can also dictate how much your feet sweat.

One thing to note is that sweat glands on the soles of your feet respond mostly to your emotions. So people who are prone to anxiety, get nervous easily or have a lot of emotional stress are more likely to have sweaty feet.

For some people, foot sweat flows in niagra-like proportions. For others, sweating is unpredictable and happens regardless of physical activity or temperature. This type of extreme sweating is called Plantar Hyperhidrosis (or excessive foot sweating).

According to the Mayo Clinic, “Hyperhidrosis is abnormally excessive sweating that’s not necessarily related to heat or exercise.”

The most common types of hyperhidrosis are:

  • Craniofacial Hyperhidrosis (Head and Face Sweating)
  • Axillary Hyperhidrosis (Sweaty Armpits)
  • Palmar Hyperhidrosis (Sweaty Palms & Hands)
  • Plantar Hyperhidrosis (Sweaty Feet)

Think you might have plantar hyperhidrosis? Consult with your doctor about possible causes and best treatment options. Hyperhidrosis could be a side effect of certain medications or a symptom of more serious health conditions (i.e. diabetes, cancer, heart failure)

What Causes Stinky Feet?

Sweat isn’t the sole contributor to foul smelling foot odor. When the bacteria on your skin mingles with sweat, it causes that “stinky feet” smell (bromhidrosis).

For most people, the odor doesn’t start out strong. But over time, the smell gets locked into your shoes, and then, mixes with more sweat and bacteria.

In mathematical terms: Sweat + Bacteria = Stinky Feet

If you’re prone to anxiety or your hormones are out of whack, it only exacerbates the sweating and odor. That’s why teenagers have such sweet smelling feet (sarcasm alert).

How to prevent sweaty feet in shoes

If you wear tennis shoes, loafers, or similar closed-toe shoes, it’s important to keep them clean and dry. Sweat and odor can build up as you sweat each day. Alternating your shoes every day can give them time to dry out and reduce bacteria.

To help keep your feet from sweating while wearing this type of shoe, consider putting a bit of baby powder into your socks.

If you prefer, you can also use anti fungal foot powder, which you can purchase at amazon or most drug stores. It will help absorb the moisture and odor causing bacteria.

Also, when you take the shoes off, put a bit of baking soda inside them to absorb left-behind moisture and neutralize the smell.

How to prevent sweaty feet in flats and heels

If you have overly sweaty feet, you probably avoid wearing flats because they aren’t worn with socks — which helps keep moisture at bay. And of course, when it comes to heels, your options are pretty much limited to strappy dress sandals or nothing. Don’t worry! You don’t have to avoid those cute ballet flats or edgy stilettos anymore.

Try soaking your feet in a 1:1 mixture of white vinegar and hot water three times per week to keep the smell away. Then, apply rubbing alcohol to the bottom of your feet before putting on your flats to help close the pores and prevent sweating. You can also use SweatBlock antiperspirant towelettes instead of rubbing alcohol.

Common Problems Caused by Sweaty Feet

Did you know sweaty feet can actually cause other problems? Basically, when your feet sweat a lot, they end up sitting in excess moisture all day long.

It’s the perfect environment for infection to breed — and some of them are pretty darn serious! And, if you have excessively sweaty feet, you’re probably more prone getting warts and blisters too.

Can sweaty feet cause athlete’s foot?

Sweat doesn’t cause athlete’s foot, but sweaty feet could lead to it if you aren’t careful. Athlete’s foot is actually a fungal infection. It’s caused when the bacteria on your feet mingles with moisture for too long.

You’re more likely to get athlete’s foot if you wear wet shoes and socks for long periods of time. By taking steps to prevent your feet from sweating too much, you lower the risk of getting athlete’s foot immensely.

Keep in mind, athlete’s foot is really easy to catch if you come in contact with the fungus directly — and because you have naturally sweaty feet, the infection is more likely to grow and spread.

So instead of going barefoot outside, at the gym, in public showers, and at swimming pools, wear flip-flops to protect your feet!

Can sweaty feet cause itching?

When most people think of skin itching, they think of dry skin. But moisture can make your skin itch too. So yes, excess sweat can cause your feet to itch. However, once you’ve washed and dried your feet, the itching should stop. The only exception to this rule would be if the added moisture causes the skin on your feet to dry out.

Keep in mind, excess sweat isn’t the only thing that can cause your feet to itch. Athlete’s foot, allergic reactions, and scabies are also common causes. So if your feet itch a lot or itch consistently, regardless of what you do, you should have a doctor examine you.

Can sweaty feet cause trench foot?

Trench foot is a serious condition that’s caused by prolonged exposure to cold and wetness. But because it depends more on the water exposure than the cold, it’s possible for people to get trench foot in the dessert too. This condition can cause nerve damage and low blood circulation, which could result in amputation if not treated.

However, you have to remember that it’s prolonged exposure to moisture that causes it. That means it takes awhile to develop. Basically, you won’t get trench foot from wearing sweaty tennies one day. You can avoid this condition by removing wet shoes and socks as soon as possible, and then, cleanse and dry your feet.

Wrap Up

Sweaty feet aren’t fun. And the resulting foot odor is even less fun. Try some of the tips above and grab yourself a foot antiperspirant (This one comes highly recommended). If you don’t get the results you’re looking for, talk to your doctor about Botox Injections or Iontophoresis Treatment.

What’s worse than a pair of sweaty armpits?

A pair of yellow sweat stains on your favorite shirt.

There’s no silver lining to sweat stains (more like gold-ish). They’re embarrassing, distracting and ruin your clothes.

If you aren’t careful, they could derail your social life and end up costing you a small fortune. (replacing your favorite outfit every 2 weeks ain’t cheap.)

Here’s the good news, there are ways to prevent sweat stains and ways to get rid of sweat stains after they occur.

We’ll help you with both…

The best way to beat pit stains is to avoid them in the first place.

5 Tips to Prevent Sweat Stains

  1. Wear a cheap undershirt to avoid getting sweat stains on your dress shirts and nice clothes. For fitted and tailored shirts you’ll want to use sweat pads or sweat guards.
  2. Use a clinical-strength antiperspirant. A strong antiperspirant can prevent bacteria-prone sweat from staining your shirts. Apply antiperspirant before bedtime and let it dry completely before getting dressed. If you put on too much antiperspirant or don’t let it dry completely, it can lead to yellow pit stains.
  3. Trim your armpit hair. Your underarm hair can collect excess sweat, dirt, and bacteria (the perfect recipe for sweat stains). By trimming pit hair, you can prevent lingering sweat and odor causing bacteria.
  4. Wash sweaty shirts ASAP! The longer you leave a sweaty shirt to dry, the stronger the stain sets in. Handwash sweaty clothes with a little bit of laundry detergent and cold water to keep the stain from setting in.
  5. Take it easy with the deodorant. Like some antiperspirants, deodorant can also cause yellow stains on your shirts. To avoid this, apply a light layer to your underarms and let it air dry before dressing. The secret here is to get the deodorant in your pits without getting it on your shirt.

If you can’t stop the sweat stains, these tips will help you to remove them.

How to Get Rid of Pit Stains

Treating sweat stains can be tricky. If you don’t wash your sweat-soiled clothes quickly and properly, the stains can set in — and may not come out at all. But the good news is, it is possible to remove sweat stains from your clothes. In fact, once you know how, it’s actually pretty easy to do.

How to Clean Pit Stains That Aren’t Totally Set In

Do you typically get pit stains on your shirt while you’re working out or while you’re cutting the grass on a hot day? If so, these are the easiest type to remove.

Sweat stains are a lot harder to remove from your clothing once they’ve set in, and for pit stains to set in, they have to dry. So if you can treat your shirt immediately, you won’t have to worry about sweat stains ruining it. And the best part is, all you need to do is run the soiled part of your shirt under some cold water. Then, gently rub the stained part of the fabric together to loosen up the stain and rinse it thoroughly. Once its dry, you can wash it with the rest of your laundry without any worries.

Can Pit Stains Be Removed If They’re Set In?

If you have sweat stains on a shirt that are already set in, they can still be removed. But it will take a bit more work than putting the shirt in cold water. There are several home remedies that will get rid of pit stains, but you need to make sure the one you use works for the type of shirt you have. For example, the process to remove sweat stains from colored clothing is different than the stain removal process you should use on white clothing — which is why we’ve outlined different techniques for you below.

How to Get Rid of Pit Stains on White Shirts

Getting pit stains on white shirts sucks. They are often even more noticeable than sweat stains on colored shirts, so when it happens, it’s can be really embarrassing — especially if you’re on a date or about to go into a big meeting.

But don’t worry. You don’t have to throw out your favorite white T-shirt or nice, crisp dress shirt. Instead, follow these instructions to remove sweat stains from white clothing.

What you need:

  • 1 cup of white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup of baking soda
  • 1 tablespoon of salt
  • 1 tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide
  • 2 cups of warm water
  • A bowl large enough to hold your shirt and the cleaning solution
  • Small bowl
  • Metal spoon
  • Towel

Once you’ve gathered all of your ingredients:

1. Pour two cups of warm water and one cup of white vinegar to your bowl.

2. Place the shirt in the water and vinegar solution so that the sweat stains are completely covered, and let it soak for between 20 and 30 minutes.

3. Combine the hydrogen peroxide, baking soda, and salt together in a small bowl. Then, use the spoon to mix the ingredients together until it forms a paste.

4. Cover a flat work surface with the towel.

5. Remove the shirt from the large bowl, and then, wring out any excess liquid.

6. Spread the shirt out over the towel, use the spoon to spread the paste mixture over the soiled parts of the shirt. Let the mixture sit on the shirt for about 20 minutes.

7. Once the paste is set in, wash the shirt with a load of whites as you normally would.

How to Get Pit Stains Out of Colored Shirts

You might be surprised to discover that the same process you use to get sweat stains out of white clothing can’t use on colored clothing — the hydrogen peroxide can ruin them.

To remove sweat stains from colored clothing, soak the item in a mixture of cold water and white vinegar for between 20 and 30 minutes. Then, run cold water over the soiled area, and gently rub the area with your fingers to loosen the stain. Then, wash the clothing like you normally would — in a load with like colors.

If you don’t have white vinegar on hand, crush a few aspirins up. Then, mix the crushed aspirin with water to make a paste. Apply the paste to the soiled area, and let it sit for about an hour before washing the piece of clothing in the washer and dryer.

Why Do Pit Stains Become Yellow?

It isn’t your sweat that causes pit stains to turn yellow. In fact, sweat is actually colorless. (Well, most of the time. There is a condition called chromhidrosis that causes people to have yellow, blue, or green sweat. But for most people sweat doesn’t have a color.)

When your sweat mixes with the bacteria on your skin, your deodorant, your antiperspirant, and even your clothing, it can cause yellow stains to appear on your clothes. But it’s the mixture of the sweat, bacteria, and chemicals that cause the yellow hue — not the sweat alone.

How to Get Rid of Yellow Pit Stains

Yellow underarm stains are probably the most embarrassing, and getting rid of them isn’t easy either. But it can be done.

What you need:

  • Liquid dish soap
  • Baking soda
  • Cold water
  • Toothbrush
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Small mixing bowl

When you have your ingredients ready, lay your shirt on a flat surface — inside out.

1. In a small bowl combine equal parts of liquid dish soap, baking soda, and hydrogen peroxide — about a tablespoon of each should do the trick. (If you’re working with a colored shirt, replace the hydrogen peroxide with cold water.)

2. Spread the mixture on the stained area of the shirt.

3. Use the toothbrush to work the mixture into the stain. It will loosen the stain up a bit so the ingredients can work their magic.

4. Let the mixture sit on your shirt for about an hour. Then, use your washer and dryer to clean the shirt as you normally would.

If you have yellow pit stains that are really hard to get out, use an old toothbrush to scrub regular table salt into the stain to loosen it up even more.

Can You Bleach Pit Stains?

While it might seem like bleach would be the best option for removing pit stains from white clothing, it isn’t. In fact, it can actually make the stain worse. So you should avoid using bleach to remove sweat stains from your clothing.

If you prefer not to use a homemade solution, Oxiclean and Puracy Natural Stain Remover are both good alternatives and can work wonders on yellow underarm stains.

Can Dry Cleaners Remove Pit Stains?

So you might be wondering what you should do if you happen to get pit stains on a shirt that’s specifically marked “Dry Clean Only.” In that case, it’s probably not a good idea to try to remove the pit stains on your own.

Professional dry cleaners are able to remove sweat stains from your shirts, but the stains aren’t removed using the normal dry cleaning process. Because of this, it’s important to point the stains out to the cleaner when you drop off your garments. This way, the technician knows that your shirts need to be pre-treated to remove the stains before they are dry cleaned.

Also, because sweat stains are harder to remove the longer they are left to set in, it’s a good idea to take your shirts to the cleaners frequently. It’s actually a good idea to take the shirt to the cleaners the same day if possible.

If you can’t get to the dry cleaner right away, apply a small amount of lemon juice and cold water to the sweat stains on your shirt. This should help prevent the sweat stains from really setting in. Make sure you only use a tiny amount though. It’s okay for the underarm area of the shirt to be slightly damp, but you don’t want to saturate it.

How to Remove Pit Stains From Shirts Before They Set In

Excessive sweating is a lot more common than you probably think. Unfortunately, it’s something that a lot of people have to deal with on a regular basis — and no one wants to walk into a client meeting or complete a presentation with pit stains on their shirt. It’s embarrassing.

If you know you have an important event or you frequently sweat through your work shirts, keep a spare in your office. As soon as you notice sweat stains appearing, change your shirt. Then, take the soiled shirt into the bathroom and run the stained area under cold water. This keeps the stain from setting in completely. You can then hang your shirt in your office to dry. Because the sweat stains didn’t have time to set in, you don’t have to worry about using special cleaning techniques on the shirt later.

If you don’t have a private office, you can still use this technique. Simply keep your spare shirt in your desk drawer or in your car so you have it when needed.

Do Pit Stains Come Out of Silk Shirts?

Pit stains do come out of silk shirts, but we don’t recommend you try to remove the stain yourself. Most silk shirts should only be dry cleaned because the fabric is so delicate. Because of this, you should leave the sweat stain removal to the pros.

Instead of trying to remove sweat stains from a silk shirt yourself, take the shirt to the dry cleaner as soon as possible. As we mentioned above, be sure to point out the stains when you drop off the shirt so it gets the little extra care it needs.

How to Prevent Sweat Stains

Most of the time, it’s a lot easier to prevent sweat stains than it is to remove them. So if you’re prone to excessive sweating, you should consider going on the defensive. But before you learn how to prevent pit stains, you need to understand what actually causes them.

How Do Pit Stains Happen?

According to Mike Thomas of Proctor & Gamble, antiperspirants are actually one of the biggest causes of armpit stains. See, antiperspirant gets absorbed into your clothing, and when it mixes with your sweat, you get nasty yellow pit stains.

But antiperspirants are also the one thing that can help reduce the amount of sweat you produce. Yep, that’s right, we’re back to the Catch-22. If you avoid using antiperspirant, you’re going to sweat a lot more, but using it leaves you with pit stains. So what do you do?

Well, you’re not going to stop using antiperspirant — or deodorant for that matter. Instead, you’re going to change the way you use it.

An Ounce of Prevention

The first thing you need to do when you’re trying to prevent pit stains is to alter your normal routine a bit. The idea is to get your sweating under control first. So instead of applying deodorant and antiperspirant in the morning before you put on your clothing, you’re going to do it at night.

Before you go to bed, take your shower and make sure your underarm area is fully dry. Then, apply a light layer of antiperspirant. We recommend using our SweatBlock towelettes because the clinical-strength antiperspirant actually works to reduce the amount of sweat your body produces for between four and seven days. After wiping your underarm area with the towelette, allow it to dry completely before putting on your pajamas. Then, all you need to do is go to bed and let SweatBlock do the work.

See, the sweat glands in your armpits aren’t as active when you’re sleeping. So it’s a lot easier for antiperspirant to get down into your pores and start working. When you get up in the morning, swipe a thin layer of deodorant onto your armpits — remember, you only want to use a thin layer because sweat stains are caused by the mixture of your deodorant, antiperspirant, and sweat. Now, the most important part is, don’t put your shirt on until your deodorant is fully dry. The key to preventing pit stains is keeping the area as moisture free as possible.

If you need a bit of added protection through the day, carry a travel-size bottle of baby powder with you. It’s easy to apply it to your underarms in small amounts, and it will absorb any moisture in the area right away. Also, don’t forget your undershirt and/or sweat guards. They will help prevent any random sweat stains from soiling your nice clothes. If you prefer an undershirt instead of sweat guards, Thompson Tee undershirts are a good option because they are form fitting, durable, and have a sweat-proof layer of fabric added to the underarm area.

How to Stop Pit Stains Caused By Nervous Sweating

Neverous sweating sucks. We’ve all been there.

It’s totally natural for your body to produce a bit more sweat when you’re nervous, but that doesn’t mean you should have to deal with sweat stains on your shirt too.

There are several things you can do to help prevent nervous sweating, which in turn, helps stop the pit stains.

  • Rub an alcohol wipe over your underarm area. Rubbing alcohol helps block your pores, which prevents excess sweat.
  • Use SweatBlock towelettes to help reduce the amount of sweat produced in your underarm area for between four and seven days.
  • Dab a slight bit of baby power on your armpits to absorb any excess moisture.

How to Prevent Pit Stains on White Shirts

Unfortunately, pit stains show up a lot easier on white shirts than they do colored ones. So the easiest way to prevent pit stains from appearing on white shirts is to wear an undershirt or sweat guards to keep the sweat at bay. Sweat guards are also commonly known as garment or dress shields. Some attach to your clothing, while others slide over your arm, attaching to the top of your arm using an elastic band.

You can even make your own garment pads by cutting a panty liner in half. Then, attaching the side with the adhesive to the armpit area of your shirt. This way they absorbent pad soaks up any armpit sweat you have throughout the day.

How to Hide Pit Stains

If all else fails, dressing strategically to hide your pit stains is a great option.

Try following some of these tips to hide embarrassing sweat stains.

Choose your shirt color wisely. Gray, bright, and light-colored shirts aren’t very forgiving, but black and navy shirts hide sweat stains well.

Layer bright colors over neutrals. If you’re worried about sweat stains, bright colored shirts are the worst option. So instead of choosing a bright colored shirt, opt for a neutral brown, navy, or black shirt and wear a bright jacket over it.

Wear cotton or linen shirts instead of shirts made of polyester or rayon. Synthetic fabrics don’t let your skin breathe at all. If possible, consider choosing a shirt made with moisture-wicking fabric.

Choose loose-fitting clothing. Shirts that are cut with long, flowing sleeves let air flow freely, which keeps your shirt away from your skin as much as possible.

In the end, a good strategy for preventing sweat stains is the best way to get rid of them: Stay clean, stay hydrated, eat healthy, dress strategically, manage stress, and use a strong antiperspirant like SweatBlock (be sure to apply at night and let it dry before getting dressed).

Sweaty Hands…

It’s difficult to understand how frustrating they are until you experience them. And we’re not talking about the occasional sweaty-palm experience…

We’re talking about embarrassing, sweaty handshakes that sabotage first impressions. The clamminess that keeps you from holding your partner’s hand on a date. Or the hand perspiration that soaks keyboards, important paperwork and game controllers.

But we don’t have to tell you how bad it is. You already know. That’s why you’re here. You want to know WHY and HOW to stop those sweaty hands and palms.

While we may not have the perfect sweaty hands cure for you, we do have a few tips to get you going in the right direction.

7 Tips and Remedies to Stop Sweaty Hands

  1. Use a specialized Hand antiperspirant
  2. Keep alcohol hand wipes handy for a quick fix
  3. Use baby powder or cornstarch to absorb palm sweat
  4. Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated and keep your body cool
  5. Avoid sweat-inducing foods like caffeine, alcohol, red meat and spicy snacks
  6. Eat vitamin-rich foods that promote balance and healthy digestion
  7. Home remedies such as sage tea soaks, rose water, or coconut oil (see below)

Before we break down these tips in detail, let’s explore some of the causes of sweaty, clammy hands…

sweaty palms causes

What Causes Sweaty Palms?

Most people experience sweaty palms during stressful situations, anxious moments, high temperatures, or physical exertion. For example, it’s not uncommon to get clammy hands during a tense movie, playing your favorite video game, climbing, or weightlifting.

These activities and higher stress levels will raise your body temperature. This makes your sweat glands release extra heat via sweat. Unfortunately, your palms don’t get a pass on this cooling process.

Can Anxiety Cause Sweaty Hands?

Anxiety, stress, and nervousness are actually some of the main culprits of sweaty hands. In fact, you’ve probably noticed that your hands start sweating before you have to speak in front of an audience or during an intimate first date. It’s completely normal.

Stress, anxiety, and nervousness are all feelings that trigger a fight-or-flight response in our bodies. These responses release the stress hormones cortisol and epinephrine.

While the hormones help you cope with whatever is making you anxious, they raise your body temperature too. Of course, your body sweats to regulate your temperature, so when you’re anxious, your sweat glands are activated.

Are Sweaty Palms Genetic?

If your hands consistently perspire, you might have inherited a few bad genes. Excessively sweaty palms can actually skip generations, so it’s possible that you inherited the problem even if your parents don’t have it.

According to studies, two-thirds of patients with hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating) have a family member with the same condition.

Hand sweat is normal, but for some, it happens in Niagara Falls-like proportions and for absolutely no reason at all. This type of sweating is called palmar hyperhidrosis.

What is Palmar Hyperhidrosis?

Palmar Hyperhidrosis is excessive and uncontrollable sweating of the hands or palms.

If this describes your situation, you’re not alone. Palmar Hyperhidrosis affects about one percent of the American population.

While anyone can suffer sweaty hands periodically, if the situation persists it is important to seek a medical assessment from a dermatologist to determine if you have palmar hyperhidrosis.

Symptoms can appear anytime, regardless of your age, but they commonly appear during adolescence, and in some cases persist throughout life.

What Causes Palmar Hyperhidrosis?

Experts don’t know the exact reason for sweaty palms. Some believe that a hyperactive sympathetic nervous system could be the cause.

The sympathetic nervous system manages the fight-or-flight response which releases adrenaline, increases heart rate, constricts blood vessels, and controls sweating. In other words, a hyperactive sympathetic nervous system can result in hyper hand sweating.

Palmer hyperhidrosis can wreck confidence and cause extreme stress. This can impact social interactions as well as professional ones, causing real issues in every aspect of your life.

In fact, many dermatologists believe that palmar hyperhidrosis causes a more significant negative impact on patient’s lives than any other dermatological condition.

sweaty hands, palms

How to Stop Sweaty Hands

So, how do you get rid of sweaty hands? We’ve put together a list of helpful tips, popular home remedies and professional treatments below.

1. Antiperspirant for Hands

Antiperspirant is the easiest way to really stop sweat. It’s accessible, affordable, and likely the most effective remedy on this list. Antiperspirants work by plugging up and shrinking your sweat pores. As a result, you’ll sweat less wherever you apply antiperspirant.

Will any old antiperspirant do the job? We recommend a specialized hand antiperspirant like this one.

Antiperspirant hand lotion is the best sweaty hand treatment we’ve found AND it won’t brake the bank. Gamers, musicians, professionals, athletes, weight lifters, climbers and nervous sweaters love this stuff.

How does it work? Dab a pea-sized amount of hand antiperspirant on your palms, rub it in, and let it dry for 30 seconds. The trick is to apply while your hands are completely dry. If they are wet -or- sweaty, the antiperspirant lotion won’t keep your hands dry.

You can apply 1-3 times a day to avoid potentially embarrassing situations. (awkward handshakes, slippery handholding, etc…)

2. Keep Alcohol-Based Hand Wipes Handy

If you need a quick fix for clammy hands, grab an alcohol-based hand wipe and rub it on your palms. Alcohol is an astringent that, when applied topically, can help keep your hands temporarily dry with its pore-shrinking abilities. This useful trick comes in handy right before an important interview or social event.

3. Use Baby Powder or Cornstarch to Absorb Sweat

Baby powder absorbs liquids. So every time you start to feel sweat on your hands, simply dust them with a small bit of baby powder. Consider carrying a travel-size bottle with you or keep one at work to use throughout the day. Look for a talc-free powder or you can use baking soda or cornstarch.

4. Drink Plenty of Water to Stay Hydrated and Keep Cool

Drink a generous amount of water throughout the day. Staying hydrated can cool your core temperature and help reduce excessive sweating.

Did you know that we humans often misdiagnose our thirst for hunger? Sometimes we interpret our body’s plea for water as a plea for a cheeseburger (spoiler alert: sweat-trigger!). So drinking more water can also help you avoid foods that trigger unwanted sweat.

confuse thirst for hunger.

5. Diet and Detox

If you’re searching for a sweaty hands cure? Food might be the “best medicine”.

Did you know that your diet can impact your sweating? Certain foods will increase your sweating while other foods can help you sweat less.

A healthy diet leads to balance and a healthier body. A poor diet leads to imbalance — physical, emotional, and mental. Imbalance can lead to chronic illness, weight gain, anxiety, and you guessed it: excessive sweating.

So… Less bad stuff + more good stuff = a happier, healthier, and less-sweaty you.

So examine your diet. You might be able to get rid of those sweaty hands with a few simple tweaks. Start with avoiding caffeine, alcoholic beverages, and spicy, fatty, fried, and processed foods. All of these can raise your body temperature and increase heart rate. When your body temperature rises, you perspire more to release the extra heat.

Next, replace the bad stuff with good food options like whole grains and almonds. Vitamins B and D can also be very useful in promoting balance. Here are a few of our favorite vitamin-rich food sources:

  • Low-fat or skim milk
  • Calcium-rich foods
  • Olive oil

You should also add fruits and vegetables that have a high water content to your diet. Like regularly drinking water, they help keep your body hydrated, which regulates your body temperature. Some options include:

  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Watermelon
  • Strawberries
  • Grapefruit
  • Apples
  • Blueberries
  • Plums
  • Oranges
  • Lettuce
  • Zucchini
  • Radishes
  • Celery

6. Home Remedies for Sweaty Palms

With home remedies, we always like to ask why and how? Why dump oatmeal on your head when you have acne? How will placing a banana in your armpit stop uncontrollable flatulence? So we’re not only going to give you the what, we’ll also throw in the how and the why.

SAGE TEA SOAK
Sage is known as Mother Nature’s antiperspirant. It contains a natural astringent called tannic acid. The tannic acid has the ability to constrict and shrink your skin and pores. This shrinking helps reduce sweat just like an antiperspirant.

How to use it:
1) Add 4-5 sage tea bags to a quart of boiling water.
2) Let the tea steep until it’s cool enough to touch.
3) Once cooled, soak your hands in the sage solution for 30 minutes.

Feeling Brave? Some “experts” claim that drinking sage tea can also reduce excessive sweat. Word of advice: don’t drink the tea you used to soak your hands. This also works well for sweaty feet.

ORGANIC ROSE WATER
Rose water can be purchased from any store that sells makeup and skincare products because it’s typically used as a skin toner. It works by closing the pores in your skin, which reduces the amount of sweat produced.

To use rose water on your sweaty hands, dip a cotton ball in it then, rub the cotton ball over your palms and let it dry. Lemon juice and apple cider vinegar can also be applied to your hands this way, but if you use either of them, you should rinse your hands off once they dry. As an alternative, you can also use witch hazel.

COCONUT OIL
After your daily shower, take a small bit of coconut oil and rub it between your palms until they are fully coated. Coconut oil is a natural antiperspirant and it has several other skin-related benefits so it will help keep your hands soft to the touch too.

REGULAR EXERCISE
It might seem odd to you to see exercising on a list of home remedies for sweaty hands. After all, when you exercise, you sweat. The thing is, exercise also helps reduce the amount of stress your body is going through. Because of this, your body’s core temperature sits lower on a regular basis, which reduces the amount of sweat your body produces overall.

It’s a good idea to fit in about 30 minutes or so of exercise five days per week. If you don’t want to hit the gym, consider taking a walk or riding a bike through your neighborhood each evening. Just don’t exercise too close to bedtime or you could have a hard time falling asleep.

Advanced Treatments for Palmar Hyperhidrosis

If palmar hyperhidrosis is what’s causing your sweaty hands, your doctor may recommend some of these treatments. However, using a clinical-strength antiperspirant is typically recommended before prescription treatments and surgery.

Prescription Medication

If antiperspirant doesn’t solve the problem completely, your doctor might recommend trying prescription medicines. These typically come in the form of topical lotions and creams. Some doctors may also suggest an anticholinergic medication. These come in pill form and work by blocking the neurotransmitter in your brain that controls your eccrine glands.

Botox Injections

When used to treat excessive sweating in small areas — such as the palms of your hands — botox has been known to effectively reduce between 82 and 87 percent of sweating. However, when used to treat sweaty hands, you have to get injections every six months and it can cause temporary pain and weakness in your hands. Because of this, it’s best to discuss all of your options with your doctor before trying botox injections.

Iontophoresis Treatments

There is also a treatment available for palmar hyperhidrosis called iontophoresis. This treatment has been known to reduce the amount of sweat produced in one’s hands by up to 81 percent, but the treatment can be a bit painful so it’s typically used as a last resort.

The treatment uses a medical device to pass a mild electrical current through water and the skin’s surface. No one is 100 percent sure how this works to prevent sweaty hands, but it’s thought that the electrical current and the minerals in the water thicken the outer layer of your skin, which in turn, blocks the sweat from getting to the surface.

You can have this treatment completed in your doctor’s office. Or if you prefer to complete the treatments at home, your doctor can write you a prescription that lets you purchase the medical device.

In some areas, the tap water is too “soft” for the treatment to work. Basically, this means that the water doesn’t have enough minerals and electrolytes. If this is the case in your area, you can add a teaspoon of baking soda to your treatment tray.

Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy (ETS) Surgery

This surgery is by far the most invasive of all hyperhidrosis treatments. The list of side effects is long and undesirable: irreversible compensatory sweating, extreme hypotension, arrhythmia, and heat intolerance.

This surgery is permanent. If cutting nerves and awful side effects sound appealing to you, this treatment might be up your alley. We stand with most doctors and recommend you steer clear.

You don’t have to let your sweaty hands control your life. It’s a common problem that can be treated. So instead of stressing yourself out over your condition, try a few home remedies and antiperspirants to see if they help. If you can’t find a solution on your own, talk to your doctor to determine what type of treatment is right for you.

Excessive underarm sweating is “the pits” – pun intended.

If you’ve ever suffered through an embarrassing sweaty hug, an awkward high-five, or a sweat-soaked job interview — this article is for you.

First, a question: What would freedom from excessive sweat mean to you?

More confidence? Less embarrassment? More living? Less hiding?

Or maybe it’s as simple as just wearing what you want without the worry of perspiration.

Let’s be honest: stopping unwanted sweat and regaining lost confidence can be “game-changing”. Wanna change your game?

Six tips to help you stop sweating so much:

  1. Use a strong antiperspirant.
  2. Apply antiperspirant correctly to maximize effectiveness.
  3. Dress strategically to reduce and conceal sweat.
  4. Manage diet to minimize sweat – Avoid sweat triggers.
  5. Exercise frequently to combat stress sweat.
  6. Relax – Don’t “sweat” your sweat.
And a few bonus tips…
7. 8 home remedies for excessive sweating.
8. Medications to control sweat.
9. Advanced treatments for hyperhidrosis.

Before we dig any deeper, check out this article about excessive sweating causes. Knowing the “why” to your sweat problem is an important step in choosing an effective treatment.

1. Use a Strong Antiperspirant

Antiperspirant Comparison Lineup.
Are you serious about stopping excessive armpit sweat?
Take your chalky, shirt-staining antiperspirant / deodorant combo and chuck it out the window. You need a solution specifically designed to stop sweat — a clinical-strength antiperspirant.

It’s not uncommon for people to turn to deodorant to prevent sweating. Unfortunately, deodorants can only mask the smell of bacteria-laden sweat, not prevent it.

Remember: Deodorant stops smell. Antiperspirant stops sweat.

You might have also discovered that drug-store antiperspirants just aren’t effective. They do more shirt-staining and stinging than sweat blocking.

The most effective antiperspirants will likely contain higher levels of aluminum chloride. (Aluminum chloride does the actual blocking of sweat).

If you want to take a serious shot at that pesky sweat, go for an antiperspirant with at least 13 percent aluminum chloride.

Many over-the-counter solutions are available. But not all are effective in treating profuse sweating (hyperhidrosis).

If you need something stronger, your doctor can recommend a prescription antiperspirant.

Bottom line, a strong antiperspirant is the easiest way to topically treat excessive underarm sweating. Although not a permanent fix, it’s still better than sticking your armpits with needles (Botox) or nuking your sweat glands (Miradry).

 

Pssst: Did you know there’s an antiperspirant that stops excessive sweat for up to 7 days? Try it today!

 

2. Apply Antiperspirant Correctly

Apply Antiperspirant.
Did you know you’ve most likely been using antiperspirant all wrong?

And you’re not alone…

Most of us wake up in the morning, take a shower, apply some antiperspirant and get on with the day. If you’re doing this, you’re doing it wrong.

Want to get the most out of your antiperspirant? Follow these simple steps:

Apply at night (or before bed):

Your antiperspirant needs time and a dry surface to effectively block sweat. At night, temperatures are lower and it’s the time of day when people are less active.

A full night of sleep plus lower sweat levels gives the antiperspirant ample time to work its magic.

Apply on a clean, dry skin surface:

Make sure your underarms (or other body parts) are dirt and residue free. Even the slightest residue from deodorant could sabotage your antiperspirants sweat-stopping abilities.

For best results, shower and ensure your underarms are completely dry before applying antiperspirant.

Optimal skin contact:

Antiperspirant works best when it has optimal contact with the skin surface. Not surprisingly, hairy armpits can prevent this from happening.

For best results, consider trimming or shaving that flattering underarm hairdo.

Warning: Do not apply antiperspirant immediately after shaving. Wait at least 24 hours to avoid unnecessary skin irritation.

Don’t give up if antiperspirant doesn’t stop sweat instantly:

Don’t lose hope if the sweat keeps flowing after just one application of antiperspirant. For some, it can take three to four days of consistent use to achieve desired results.

Once the antiperspirant starts working, you can apply as needed.

Be smart: If your antiperspirant is causing severe skin irritation or burning – STOP using it. Not everything works for everyone. Test antiperspirant on a small area of skin before applying to all your problem areas.

3. Dress Strategically:

Stop Sweat, Dress Strategically.
As the weather changes, so does your wardrobe. You dress light when it’s hot, and bundle up when it’s cold.

For a lot of us, excessive sweating just happens. It doesn’t matter how hot it is, how cold it is, if you’re running a marathon or sitting on the couch – the sweat comes… and comes…

It doesn’t hurt to have a few wardrobe tricks up your sleeve to conceal and reduce sweating when it matters most.

Dress in light, breathable fabrics with ample ventilation.

This keeps the temperature down and the air flowing to help reduce sweat levels. A word of caution, sporting a tank top to your next job interview may not be appropriate or effective.

Avoid these sweat amplifying colors when possible.

If you have an important engagement or social event – ditch the light blues, grays, and bright colors. They’ll betray you and steal your confidence faster than you can say “whoa nellie!”

Keep these sweat-concealing colors and styles handy.

Dark blues, blacks, dark colors and distracting patterns are excellent sweat-camouflage. Jackets, hoodies and sweatshirts are always useful in keeping sweat marks hidden.

But seriously, let’s just forget this whole “dressing strategically” bit. Grab a strong antiperspirant and you’ll be able to wear what you want, where you want, without the worry of sweat. We’ve heard this one is pretty good ;).

4. Manage Diet to Manage Sweat

Avoid foods that make you sweat more.
Your diet can influence your health, your physique, and your sweat levels. Eating certain foods can make you sweat more than normal. Avoiding other foods can help you sweat less.

Make these tweaks to your diet and it just may solve your sweat problem(s).

Stay Hydrated

Aside from keeping you alive, water provides other useful benefits. In this instance, it helps cool your body. Lower core temperature means your body doesn’t have to sweat as much to release extra heat.

On the other hand, dehydration can lead to more sweating. Moral of the story, drink plenty of water and you’ll sweat a lot less. You may have heard the eight cups a day rule, but experts suggest nine cups for women and 13 for men.

Avoid Spicy Foods

Your body reacts to spicy food the same way it would to a hot, sunny day. It makes you sweat, even if the outside temperature is cold.

Cut down on deep fried, fatty, processed foods

Avoid fast foods, chocolate, white bread, junk food, and other carb-loaded comfort foods. Some people swear that a low carb/no carb lifestyle can be a cure for excessive sweating.

Avoid Caffeine-Loaded Coffee & Energy Drinks

Unfortunately, your morning coffee isn’t just good for extra energy – it’s also great for extra sweat.

Take Vitamin B

Vitamin B helps your organs and other vital systems function properly. So when you have enough vitamin B in your body, it doesn’t work as hard, which of course means you produce less sweat.

Even better, adding a vitamin B tablet to your daily routine can also give you more energy throughout the day.

Eat Your Fruits and Veggies

Eating fruits and vegetables is a great way to reduce the amount of sweat your body generates.

Fruits and veggies can help aid in the digestion process and give you essential vitamins. If your digestion if off, your body automatically produces excess sweat.

Here are some fruits and veggies that promote healthy digestion:

  • Cucumbers
  • Celery
  • Watermelon
  • Spinach
  • Lettuce
  • Grapefruit
  • Bell peppers
  • Olive Oil

5. Exercise regularly to combat stress sweat

Reduce stress sweat with exercise.
Typically, we don’t think of exercise as a way of reducing sweat. But in this case, it can do exactly that.

Here’s how:

First, exercise can lower the stress hormone cortisol. Second, exercise can trigger the release of endorphins. Endorphins reduce your perception of pain, help you relax, and provide a feeling of satisfaction, kind of like morphine.

Lower stress hormone levels combined with the release of endorphins puts your body at ease. This can minimize the chance of an excessive sweat response to everyday stressors.

Less stressing = less sweating.

6. Relax – Don’t “sweat” your sweat.

Stress Sweat.
Stressing about your sweat will only make it worse. We call this the stress/sweat cycle. You sweat — your sweat leads to stress — then your stress leads to even more sweat… etc.. etc… etc…

Learn how to manage your stress and you’ll be one step closer to managing unwanted sweat.

Here’s the key: you need to trick your body into thinking common stressors are no big deal. Common stressors include job interviews, first dates, sales calls, tests, etc… (whatever stresses you out)

Nervous sweat or stress sweat happens when your body mistakenly thinks it’s in danger. A date or job interview are hardly dangerous.

Follow these steps to keep your body from going into full-blown panic mode when you encounter potential stressors:

Prepare: Before you encounter a stressful situation, study your thoughts. Ask yourself, what do you really have to be nervous about? Write it down. Once you’ve established the source of your stress, it becomes easier to dispel it.

Practice the meditation techniques below to prepare your mind for potentially stressful situations.

Breath: Tell yourself to breathe. It’s not uncommon for people to unknowingly hold their breath when under stress. Taking a slow, deep breath tells your body that it’s not in any sort of danger. Inhale deeply and slowly through your nose, hold your breath for three seconds, then exhale slowly through your mouth. Repeat this 10 times.

Focus on the Moment: Don’t get caught up in all the worst-case scenarios that stress puts you through. If you let yourself get carried away, you’ll end up sweating over those “what ifs” and lose focus on the moment at hand.

Don’t Obsess Over the Sweat: If you start to sweat, don’t worry about it. You don’t need to add another layer of worry to the stress ball which induced the sweating in the first place. Don’t let uninvited sweat marks distract you from important things in life.

7. Home Remedies to Stop Sweating

sage tea excessive sweating home remedy

If you’re prone to excessive sweating, there are home remedies that can help.

For the sake of transparency: These remedies are not lab tested, medically based, or proven to be effective on a large scale. It doesn’t mean they don’t work.

But, It’s important to remember that not all home remedies will work for everyone. Body chemistry varies from person to person. Some sweat more than others and for very different reasons. That’s why not every home remedy will control sweat for everyone.

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar is a natural astringent. When applied topically, it tightens skin pores and helps control sweat production. It can also help rid your body of odor-causing bacteria by balancing pH levels of the body. In a way, it’s a natural antiperspirant and deodorizer.

To apply vinegar to your skin:
1) Soak a cotton ball in apple cider vinegar until it’s fully saturated.
2) Apply apple cider vinegar to your problem areas at night just before you go to bed.

In the morning, wash the vinegar off of your skin before you start getting ready for the day.

If you prefer, you can also drink the apple cider vinegar, but be warned; it doesn’t taste like apple cider. Simply mix a couple of tablespoons of apple cider vinegar and honey into a glass of water and drink it daily. It helps to dry out your skin, which prevents sweat from coming through your pores.

Sage Tea

Sage is one of the better herbal remedies for excessive sweating. It contains a natural astringent called tannic acid. Tannic acid has the ability to constrict and shrink your skin and pores. This shrinking helps reduce sweat just like an antiperspirant. Sage also helps kill odor-causing bacteria found in the armpits and feet.

Sage for Sweaty Armpits…
Add two sage tea bags to two cups of boiling water. Let steep and cool to room temperature. Dab generously on underarms with clean towel. Repeat two or more times daily for best results.

Sage for Sweaty Hands and Feet…
Add four to five sage tea bags to a quart of boiling water. Let the tea steep until it’s cool enough to touch. Once cooled, soak your hands/feet in the sage solution for 30 minutes. Repeat his process daily (multiple times daily for best results).

Feeling Brave? Drink a cup of sage tea before bedtime. Some experts claim that drinking sage tea can also reduce excessive sweat.

Black Tea

Black tea makes a great natural antiperspirant due to its high levels of tannic acid. Its astringent properties tighten the skin and constrict the pores to reduce sweat.

Black tea for underarm sweating…
Add two tea bags of black tea to three to four cups of boiling water. Steep for 10-15 minutes and let cool. Dab thoroughly on underarms.

Black tea for hand and foot sweating…
Add two bags of black tea to four cups boiling water. Allow to steep in large basin or bowl for 10 minutes. When water is cool enough to touch, soak your palms or feet for 20 minutes. Like anything else, repetition is key. The effectiveness of the treatment can increase as you repeat this process daily.

Baking Soda

To be clear, baking soda will not stop excessive sweating. It does have sweat-absorbing properties that can keep you dry for short periods, but it’s more of an odor blocker than a sweat blocker.

Baking soda makes an excellent natural deodorant. It has the ability to lower pH levels in your body and absorb foul odors caused by bacteria. Many natural deodorants use baking soda as their primary deodorizing ingredient.

To apply, mix equal parts baking soda and cornstarch. Additonally, you can add lavender essential oil for its skin-soothing properties and sweet fragrance. Apply the mixture with a damp cloth to clean underarms. After 20-30 minutes, rinse with water. Again, repetition helps with effectiveness.

Chamomile Tea

As stated above, a great way to reduce excessive sweating is by managing stress and anxiety.

Chamomile is one of the best herbs for eliminating stress and promoting relaxation. Both things that contribute to excessive sweating. Chamomile can also aid in digestion and get rid of body odor.

What to do? Drink two to three cups of chamomile tea each day to stay calm and fresh smelling. Remember, less stress and anxiety can lead to less sweat.

You might also place a few drops of chamomile oil into your bath water for a nice chamomile soak.

Wheatgrass

Wheatgrass can influence common sweat triggers including: pH levels, metabolism, digestive system, toxin levels, and chronic illness. These are all contributors to sweat production. Adding wheatgrass to your daily regime can help keep these sweat triggers in the “off” position.

Drink wheatgrass juice daily to get maximum benefit (available in powder form also).

Witch Hazel

Witch Hazel is also one of nature’s natural astringents (ability to shrink skin and constrict pores). Some of the most effective antiperspirants contain witch hazel. It can be particularly helpful in preventing face sweating.

Application for sweaty face, armpits and feet: Soak a cotton pad in a witch hazel solution and apply to affected areas. You can leave the witch hazel on or wash it off after 30 minutes. Repeat this process daily for maximum effectiveness.

Potato

Some home remedy experts claim that potatoes can absorb excess sweat on the body. This one does seem a bit “out there” but many consider it an effective natural antiperspirant.

How it works: Take a small piece of potato, rub it on your sweat-prone areas. Let the potato residue dry completely on skin before getting dressed. Experts also suggest wearing light, loose-fitting clothing.

Can Baby Powder Stop Sweat?

Contrary to some advice, baby powder doesn’t stop sweat. It absorbs it. If you’re willing to put up with the mess, you can apply baby powder to sweat-prone areas. Look for a talc-free baby poweder that uses cornstarch or baking soda, especially for your more private body parts.

Can Alcohol Stop Sweat?

Alcohol doesn’t stop sweat completely. It works the same way vinegar does. It helps close the pores of your skin, which helps prevent excess sweating. You can use rubbing alcohol topically. Just apply it the same way you would the apple cider vinegar.

Alcohol wipes can be a quick, though temporary, fix for sweaty hands. Simply rub your palms with alcohol wipes before any social encounter. This can help your hands stay dry enough to avoid awkward sweaty handshakes.

Keep in mind, you can’t consume rubbing alcohol. Also, using it overnight isn’t the best way to use alcohol to treat excess sweating. It’s a better idea to keep alcohol wipes on hand to use them as needed.

8. Medications to Prevent Excess Sweating

Medications for excessive sweating
Home remedies and medications can also come in handy during your battle against perspiration. It’s important to remember, all you need to do is find the right combination of sweat-reducing methods for your body. Once you do, excessive sweating will rarely cross your mind.

What Medications Can Stop Sweat?

If you prefer to use medication to stop sweating, it’s an available option. You should talk to your doctor to determine which type of medication is right for you. In most cases, you have an option of either an oral or topical treatment.

Consider Prescription Anticholinergics

When all other options are exhausted, your doctor may prescribe you an anticholinergic medication. These work by blocking the binding of your brain’s neurotransmitters to the receptor in its nerve cells. Basically, the medication blocks the signals in your brain that tell your body to produce a lot of sweat.

Some commonly prescribed medications include:

  • Glycopyrrolate
  • Propantheline
  • Benztropine
  • Oxybutynin

Topical Prescription-strength Treatments

Instead of prescribing a pill, your doctor may prefer you try a topical treatment first. Typically, topical treatments are simply prescription-strength antiperspirants that work by closing the sweat ducts on the area of skin where the medication is applied. Prescription-strength antiperspirant typically has higher concentrations of aluminum chloride.

Most of the time, this type of prescription is only recommended to help with massive sweating problems. After all, your body needs to be able to sweat a little bit. So talk to your doctor about what’s best for you.

9. Hyperhidrosis Surgery and Other Advanced Treatments

Hyperhidrosis Treatments

Botox® to Stop Sweating

If a clinical strength antiperspirant isn’t working for you, Botox® may be a viable treatment to stop stubborn sweat. OnabotulinumtoxinA Injections (Botox®) work by blocking a specific neurotransmitter in your body that stimulates your sweat glands. It essentially blocks the chemicals responsible for turning your sweat glands “on”.

Botox® involves the insertion of small needles into sweat prone areas of your body (armpits, hands, feet, head and face). If needles make you squeamish, you may want to look elsewhere for your sweating cure.

Botox® is not a permanent fix, but it can be effective. In fact, a few injections into the armpits can prevent excessive sweating for up to 6 months. Because of this, many brides choose this option to avoid getting sweat stains on their wedding dress. Sometimes teenagers heading to prom might also get this treatment, with their parents’ approval and credit cards, of course.

miraDry

miraDry is a non-invasive process where your sweat glands are “zapped” with electromagnetic energy. No sweat glands mean no sweat. Since your sweat glands don’t grow back, the results are long lasting, if not permanent. miraDry treatment costs are around $3000 and those who have undergone the procedure describe it as painful.

Studies reveal an 83 percent reduction in excessive armpit sweating. So if you can fork up the cash and don’t mind parting with your sweat glands for eternity, it might be a good idea.

Iontophoresis “Injection without a needle”

Iontophoresis is a procedure used to treat excessive sweating on the hands and feet. It’s an advanced treatment for people who suffer from hyperhidrosis or people who have failed to achieve results with clinical strength antiperspirants.

How does Iontophoresis work? It’s like an electrical injection. Patients place their hands or feet in water medicated with an anticholinergic (hyperhidrosis medication). Then the Iontophoresis device delivers the medication via electrical currents through the skin. Iontophoresis has been effective in treating sweaty feet, sweaty hands and facial hyperhidrosis.

Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy (most invasive)

This is probably the most dangerous treatment that involves destroying nerve endings associated with overactive sweat glands.

Curettage for underarm (axillary) hyperhidrosis

This treatment involves scraping and vacuuming out the sweat glands in the armpit area. Ouch.

It isn’t always easy to determine what type of products will work best to stop sweat for you. But there are plenty of options available. And once you find a solution that works, you can worry less about things like clammy hands, facial sweat or sweat-drenched shirts. You can hold your head high and walk into that first date or job interview with confidence.

Did you know that deodorant and antiperspirant aren’t the same? It’s okay if you didn’t; most people think they’re interchangeable — but they aren’t.

5 Key Facts About Antiperspirant and Deodorant

  1. Deodorant controls odor but isn’t very effective at controlling sweat.
  2. Antiperspirant blocks sweat glands, reducing the amount of perspiration your body produces.
  3. Using a combination of deodorant and antiperspirant gives you the best solutions of both worlds.
  4. Neither deodorant or antiperspirant cause cancer.
  5. Deodorant and antiperspirant together contribute more to sweat stains than sweat.

Beat the Stink with Deodorant

Here’s the thing: sweat doesn’t stink.

Yeah, you read that right. Most people associate body odor with excessive sweating, but your sweat doesn’t actually stink.

Body odor occurs when the proteins and fat in your sweat mingle with the bacteria on your skin. The parts of your body that do produce an odor when sweating, have two things in common: more bacteria growth and apocrine glands.

See, not all sweat glands are created equally. The apocrine glands, located primarily around your underarms and groin, tend to be the most stinky because they sweat they produce is laced with fat and proteins. When this mixes with the bacteria on your skin, it creates a funky odor.

Also, because some parts of your body are more prone to bacteria growth, they are also more prone to unwanted odors. Areas that aren’t prime breeding grounds for bacteria can still sweat, but they won’t stink.

For example, you might sweat a lot on your face or have a problem with clammy hands, but your face and hands don’t have an odor when you’re sweating. On the flip side, areas of your body that are prone to high levels of bacteria, such as your armpits and groin area, do get a funky odor when you sweat.

Basically, body odor is produced by that specific combination of fat and protein in your sweat mixing with bacteria on your skin.

How Does Deodorant Work?

Deodorant works by killing the bacteria on your skin. This way when you sweat, there isn’t enough bacteria sitting on your skin to create an odor. Your armpits and pubic area have thousands of hairs. These hairs hold on to bacteria and sweat, which is why, when it comes to body odor, these are the most problematic areas of your body.

When and Where Should You Use Deodorant?

Deodorant is meant to be used on your armpits. However, some women also use it underneath their breasts. It’s also common for people to swipe deodorant along their upper inner thigh — the bikini area — to help mask odors and prevent chafing. But it’s important to remember that these aren’t places that deodorant is meant to be used. For these body parts, baby powder is a much better — and safer — option.

You should apply deodorant to your underarm area when you get out of the shower. But you need to wait until your skin is fully dry.

You can also apply deodorant mid-day if you feel like you’re starting to get a bit funky. After all, you don’t want to be the person in the office that’s stinking up the room. It’s embarrassing. Fortunately, you can purchase travel-size deodorants to keep at work, in your gym bag, or even in your purse to make mid-day applications easy and convenient. In addition to layering on the deodorant and baby powder, you can also use body spray, perfume, or cologne to help mask any unwanted odors throughout the day.

Which Deodorant Is Best?

If you’re on a mission to find the best deodorants on the market, you might be a bit disappointed to know that there’s not really a one-size-fits-all solution. Everyone’s body is different. So the deodorant that your bestie swears by may not be the right option for you. That’s okay though because there are plenty of products available. You could even opt for an all-natural or homemade deodorant over a more traditional brand.

Most of the options you find at the store are a combination of deodorant and antiperspirant. So if you pick up a product from a popular company, such as Secret, Speedstick, or Dove, and read the label, there’s a good chance you’ll notice that the product is actually both a deodorant and antiperspirant. This is a good option for you if you want to mask body odor and prevent sweating. But if you sweat excessively, the antiperspirant that’s in your deodorant may not be enough. You should consider using a stronger antiperspirant, such as SweatBlock, in addition to your deodorant.

Natural and homemade deodorants don’t have an antiperspirant in them. This means that unless you rarely sweat, you would need to use an antiperspirant too. Most natural options are made using plant-based ingredients and scented with essential oils. If you have sensitive skin, consider purchasing or making unscented natural deodorant.

If razor burn is a problem for you, consider using a spray-on deodorant that includes a moisturizer. Just make sure it’s alcohol-free so it won’t burn when you apply it. If you have sensitive skin, consider using a deodorant made using coconut oil. This should help avoid any skin irritation problems you might be experiencing. If you experience excessive sweating, pick up a deodorant with a clinical-strength antiperspirant.

Stop the Sweat with Antiperspirant

If you’re worried about sweat stains on your clothing, your sweaty feet stinking up your shoes, or you’re embarrassed by your clammy hands, you need antiperspirant, not deodorant. Antiperspirant helps you stop sweating, deodorant doesn’t.

Your body is covered with sweat glands, and there are two different types: eccrine glands and apocrine glands. This means your body can produce sweat in any area, even though some areas are more problematic than others.

Sweating helps regulate your body temperature. So even though it can be embarrassing, it’s perfectly normal. But people don’t just sweat while doing strenuous activities. You might sweat excessively when you’re nervous or stressed too.

How Does Antiperspirant Work?

Antiperspirants use aluminum salts to dissolve the moisture on the surface of your skin. As it dissolves, it forms a gel that temporarily sits on tops of your sweat glands to help prevent additional sweating. This reduces that amount of sweat your body produces.

When and Where Should You Use Antiperspirant?

Unlike deodorant, antiperspirant can be used anywhere on your body. That’s why people prone to excessive sweating should use a clinical strength antiperspirant in addition to their deodorant. Products, such as SweatBlock, can be used to reduce the amount of sweat produced on your underarm area, face, groin area, and hands — and the results last between four and seven days, making it a great option for anyone who’s prone to excessive sweating.

But unlike deodorant, you should actually apply antiperspirant at night — before you go to bed. See, it takes awhile for antiperspirant to start working. Also, your sweat glands are less active when you’re sleeping because your body temperature naturally cools when you rest. This means the antiperspirant you choose doesn’t need to work as hard to give you the results you desire.

So if you plan to use a clinical strength antiperspirant, you should take your shower at night. Then, when your skin is completely dry, apply your antiperspirant and wait for it to dry completely — about five minutes or so. Once it’s dry, all you need to do is go to bed and let the antiperspirant do its thing.

Which Antiperspirant Is Best?

Because antiperspirant is a product that you use on your body, what someone deems the best antiperspirant may not work for you. Basically, you need to try different ones on your own to determine whether or not it’s right for you. Of course, we’re partial to SweatBlock towelettes. (Insert smiling winky face here.)

If you don’t sweat excessively or you hardly sweat, an antiperspirant and deodorant combination might work really well for you. However, if you’re prone to excessive sweating, you should opt for a product with a clinical-strength antiperspirant such as SweatBlock antiperspirant towelettes. (Heck, even if you do use a deodorant with a clinical-strength antiperspirant, you should keep SweatBlock towelettes on hand to use in a pinch.)

Deodorant vs Antiperspirant: Which One Is Better?

If you’re trying to compare deodorant and antiperspirant to determine which one is better, you won’t really find a good answer. They are two different things that serve two entirely different purposes. Instead of comparing the two, you need to think about the problem you’re trying to solve, choose the option that will help you solve it, and compare different brands until you find the one that works best for your body.

Deodorant vs Antiperspirant Difference

The difference between deodorant and antiperspirant comes down to what they do. Deodorant masks your body odor and antiperspirant helps reduce the amount of sweat your body produces. It’s that simple.

If it’s body odor you’re battling, you should be comparing different deodorants to find one that works well for you. If you’re trying to combat excessive sweating, you need to compare antiperspirants. You can also use a combination of products to get the results you desire. For example, if you experience slight body odor and excessive sweating, you could use a deodorant with a clinical-strength antiperspirant every day and use SweatBlock towelettes in your most problematic areas every four to seven days. This way you eliminate your body odor and greatly reduce the excessive sweating.

Remember, everyone has their own unique body odor and everyone sweats. So while it can be embarrassing, it’s completely normal. You aren’t the only one fighting these problems. And the best part is, sweating and body odor are conditions that are treatable. With the right products, you don’t have to worry about having clammy hands on a first date, sweating through your shirt during a business meeting, or having funky-smelling armpits halfway through that job interview.