best deodorant for sweat

So, you’re looking for the best deodorant for sweat…

Lucky for you, we’ve scoured the universe in search of deodorants that are strong on sweat and even stronger on odor.

Top 10 Best Deodorants for Sweaty Armpits

Some armpits are sweatier than others. That’s why we’ve included the best deodorants for mild, moderate, and excessive sweating.

Best Deodorant for Light Sweating

  • 1. Dove Advanced Care Antiperspirant Deodorant
  • 2. Degree Advanced Protection Antiperspirant Deodorant
  • 3. Art of Sport Antiperspirant Deodorant
  • 4. Gillette Antiperspirant Deodorant

Best Deodorant for Moderate Sweating

  • 5. Certain Dri Everyday Strength
  • 6. Degree Clinical Antiperspirant Deodorant
  • 7. Dove Clinical Protection Deodorant Antiperspirant
  • 8. Gillette Clinical Strength Antiperspirant Deodorant Gel

Best Deodorant for Excessive Sweating and Hyperhidrosis

  • 9. Certain Dri Prescription Strength Roll On
  • 10. SweatBlock Clinical Strength Antiperspirant Wipes

Did you know the average human sweats around 278 gallons each year? That’s a lot of soaked shirts and sweaty armpits.

Experts say the human body has 2-4 MILLION sweat glands. Unfortunately, large numbers of these sweat-secreting glands live in your armpits.

Now you know who to send those thank you cards to…

Dear sweat glands, thanks for the sweaty armpits! They made my presentation truly... unforgettable.

Joking aside… sweaty underarms and pit stains are no laughing matter. They ruin your shirts, cripple your social life and sap your confidence.

You need a strong deodorant to tame those sweat glands and keep foul body odor at bay.

What is the best deodorant for sweaty armpits?

This is a tricky question. It’s almost like asking “what’s the best car for space travel?”

Confused? Let me explain…

A car won’t get you very far on your space odyssey. Just like a deodorant won’t get you far in your fight against armpit sweat.

You need a spaceship for space travel. You need antiperspirant for stopping sweat.

There are several differences between antiperspirant and deodorant, but the main difference is this…

Deodorant stops odor. Antiperspirant stops sweat.

If armpit sweat is your problem, you should be asking “what is the best antiperspirant for sweaty armpits?”

If ending stinky AND sweaty armpits is your goal, you need both antiperspirant and deodorant -or- a deodorant antiperspirant combo.

Now that we’re asking the right question, we can get some real answers…

What is the best deodorant (antiperspirant) for sweat?

When choosing the best deodorant for sweat, you need to consider a few things:

Sweat Levels

  • How much do you sweat? (light, moderate, excessive)
  • What climate do you live in? (cold, hot, humid)
  • What’s your lifestyle like? (sedentary, active, always on the move)

Your sweat levels will largely determine which deodorant options will work best for you.

If you’re a light sweater, a deodorant antiperspirant combo is best.

If your sweating is on the heavy side, you’ll get better results when using a pure antiperspirant.

If your sweat is excessive, you’ll want a clinical strength or prescription strength antiperspirant. These antiperspirants are much stronger and specifically formulated to treat excessive sweating and hyperhidrosis.

Bottom line… the more you sweat, the stronger you’ll want your antiperspirant.

Ingredients

Many people with sensitive skin prefer an all-natural or unscented deodorant or antiperspirant. These natural products are available online, or at retail outlets like Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s. You can find them made with natural ingredients like essential oils, baking soda, witch hazel, or coconut oil. Keep in mind, antiperspirants don’t typically fit in the natural category and contain ingredients like Aluminum Chloride. If you need a product to stop sweat, you may have to compromise on your natural prefrences. In fact, unless the product contains aluminum, it won’t be very effective at stopping those sweaty pits.

Staining

If you don’t mind occasionally cleaning white marks and residue off your clothes, you can choose from the full range of affordable drugstore brands of antiperspirant deodorants. They work fairly well and are available at all drug stores and supermarkets. But if white antiperspirant stains drive you crazy, you might want to consider antiperspirant wipes, spray versions, or even gels.

Top 10 Best Deodorants for Sweaty Armpits

For the sake of transparancy, this list was compiled based on 2 primary factors; popularity and consumer feedback. While other “cute” deodorant products are out there. This list contains only the serious sweat contenders. For your convenience, we’ve organized them by strength and sweat severity.

If you’re after natural deodorant options, you won’t find them on this list. Natural solutions will do little to nothing to stop armpit sweat.

Best deodorants for light to mild sweating

1. DOVE Advanced Care Antiperspirant Deodorant for Women

Dove deodorant is a gentle, over-the-counter antiperspirant deodorant for women with sensitive skin or who don’t necessarily need clinical strength formulations.
Strength: 💪
Active Ingredient: Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex GLY (15.2%)
Sweat & Odor Protection Duration: 48 Hours
Available at: Amazon.com

2. DEGREE Advanced Protection Antiperspirant Deodorant

Degree deodorant is another over-the-counter brand that offers a wide range of body-responsive products for both men and women, all designed to work hardest when you need them the most.
Strength: 💪 💪
Active Ingredient: Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex GLY (18.2%)
Sweat & Odor Protection Duration: 24 Hours
Available on: Amazon.com

3. ART OF SPORT Antiperspirant Deodorant for Athletes

Performance driven and formulated by and for athletes.
Strength: 💪 💪
Active Ingredient: Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex GLY (15.2%)
Sweat & Odor Protection Duration: 24 Hours
Available on: Amazon.com

4. GILLETTE Antiperspirant Deodorant for Men

Degree deodorant is another over-the-counter brand that offers a wide range of body-responsive products for both men and women, all designed to work hardest when you need them the most.
Strength: 💪 💪
Active Ingredient: Aluminum zirconium octachlorohydrex GLY (16%)
Sweat & Odor Protection Duration: 48 Hours
Available on: Amazon.com

Best Deodorants for Moderate Sweating

5. CERTAIN DRI Everyday Strength Antiperspirant Deodorant

Certain Dri deodorant antiperspirant provides all day protection against sweat and odor.
Strength: 💪 💪 💪
Active Ingredient: Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex GLY (20%)
Sweat & Odor Protection Duration: 24 Hours
Available on: Amazon.com

6. DEGREE CLINICAL Antiperspirant Deodorant

This product represents the Degree brand’s strongest concentration of active ingredient designed to prevent heavier sweating. Like all Degree products, this one is designed to respond to your body chemistry in order to provide the highest level of sweat protection.
Strength: 💪 💪 💪
Active Ingredient: Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex GLY (20%)
Sweat & Odor Protection Duration: 24 Hours
Available on: Amazon.com

7. DOVE Clinical Protection Deodorant Antiperspirant

Dove offers this stronger deodorant antiperspirant combo for moderate sweating. Strong, but soothing with ingredietns to condition and moisturize the skin.
Strength: 💪 💪 💪
Active Ingredient: Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex GLY (20%)
Sweat & Odor Protection Duration: 48 Hours
Available on: Amazon.com

8. GILLETTE Clinical Strength Antiperspirant Deodorant Gel

If you’re heading for a marathon, a strength-training session, or just a stress-filled workday, this sport-level, strong deodorant for men boasts that it can keep the sweat away.
Strength: 💪 💪 💪
Active Ingredient: Aluminum Zirconium Octachlorohydrex GLY (20%)
Sweat & Odor Protection Duration: 48 Hours
Available on: Amazon.com

Best Deodorants for Excessive Sweating

For those who need something stronger, consider the following products that are formulated to treat excessive sweating and axillary hyperhidrosis.

9. CERTAIN DRI Prescription Strength Antiperspirant Roll-on

If you’re a heavy sweater, Certain Dri can effectively stop sweaty underarms for up to 72 hours.
Strength: 💪 💪 💪 💪
Active Ingredient: Aluminum Chloride (12%)
Sweat Protection Duration: 72 Hours
Available on: Amazon.com

10. SWEATBLOCK Clinical Strength Antiperspirant Wipes

Deemed by customers as “the antiperspirant that works when nothing else will!” SweatBlock is an over-the-counter pure antiperspirant solution. Featured on many TV shows and publications including The Rachael Ray Show, Dr Oz, Buzzfeed, Bustle and Men’s Fitness. The first antiperspirant of its kind, boasting 4-7 days of sweat protection with a unique wipe application.
Strength: 💪 💪 💪 💪 💪
Active Ingredient: Aluminum Chloride (14%)
Sweat Protection Duration: 4-7 Days per application
Available on: Amazon.com

Once you determine which antiperspirant or deodorant you want to try, make sure you use it correctly. Yes, there’s a right way, a best way to use deodorants and antiperspirants.

How to get the most out of your antiperspirant

The best antiperspirant in the world may not be helpful if you don’t use it to its fullest potential. Below are a few tips to help you get the most out of your antiperspirant every time you use it.

Apply your antiperspirant to clean, dry, non-irritated skin and give it plenty of time to dry before you get dressed. This will help it be more effective and cut down on its potential to leave any residue on your clothes. For example, you don’t want to apply antiperspirant to armpits that are already sweaty or that are still damp after your shower. Consider using a hair dryer on a cool setting once you get out of the shower to make sure your armpits are nice and dry before applying antiperspirant.

If you’re using a clinical-strength deodorant or antiperspirant, apply at night to allow the active ingredients to start working on your sweat glands before you need it. You’re also typically cooler at night before bed, so this allows the antiperspirant to have maximum effectiveness. In fact, using your antiperspirant at night allows it to work all night while you sleep, which sets you up for a sweat-free day. And if you apply your antiperspirant at night, you dramatically reduce your chances of any residue discoloring your daytime clothes.

You can still apply your antiperspirant again in the morning; twice-daily applications have, in some studies, shown the greatest user benefits. But if you only want to apply it once a day, night time is best. Some users report that gently massaging the antiperspirant into their skin is also beneficial.

One point to remember: Go easy on the amount of antiperspirant you use – a little antiperspirant goes a long way. You don’t have to cake it on and doing so can wreak havoc on the clothes you’re wearing.

Can You Use Deodorant and Antiperspirant Together?

Yes, you can combine deodorant and antiperspirant, but you do need to keep some particulars in mind. The main difference between deodorant and antiperspirant is that deodorant is formulated merely to neutralize body odor once sweat is already on your skin, while antiperspirant is able to temporarily block the flow of sweat before it begins. The metallic salts in antiperspirants, including compounds like aluminum chlorohydrate, create a temporary blockage within the sweat duct, which reduces sweat flow.

Most dermatologists agree that the best deodorant for sweaty armpits is actually a combination of deodorant and antiperspirant. By using the combo, you’re fighting sweat at its source and also any chance of resulting odor.

Take Control of Your Armpit Sweat

It’s no fun to spend your day worrying about raising your arms for fear of revealing sweat stains and odor. The reality is that the wrong antiperspirant–or deodorant–can literally put you right in the middle of a sticky (not to mention smelly) situation. If you sweat lightly, you’re probably fine with a regular deodorant to keep smelling fresh. People who sweat moderately would do well using an antiperspirant and deodorant combination. For those who suffer from extreme sweating, a clinical-strength antiperspirant like SweatBlock is the best way to stay dry.

Picking the right antiperspirant or deodorant for you can be a challenge, especially since so many options are available. But if you follow the guidelines here, you’ll be well on your way to making a well-informed decision, along with staying dry and odor-free.

Out of the calm comes the impending doom. It happens when you interact with others. Perhaps it’s a meeting, a presentation, a first date, or even a simple chat with a significant someone. You begin to sweat because you’re nervous. Then you get even more nervous because you’re sweating. You’re caught in the vicious vortex of anxiety sweating.

anxiety sweat

11 Tips to Beat Anxiety and Reduce Stress

  • 1. Let Go and Relax
  • 2. Try Meditation, Visualization or Yoga
  • 3. Dress to Sweat Less and Stress Less
  • 4. Limit “Sweat Triggers” from Your Diet
  • 5. Drink Your Water!
  • 6. Consider a Home Remedy
  • 7. Splash Some Cool Water on Your Face and Wrists
  • 8. Carry a Handkerchief or Baby Wipes
  • 9. Use a Prescription-Strength Antiperspirant
  • 10. Anxiety Medications
  • 11. Other More Expensive and Invasive Treatments

Understanding your nerves and social anxiety is the first step to beating stress sweat.

What is Anxiety?

Anxiety is the emotion you feel when you’re afraid or worried. It’s a natural response to stress. When you feel threatened, physically or emotionally, you feel apprehension and fear about what might be coming.

Anxiety is normal and can be healthy. If anxiety is due to a physical threat, adrenaline is injected into the bloodstream and prepares you with the fight or flight reflex.

Emotional anxiety is that worrisome feeling and unease, sometimes vague, that occurs when no physical threat or danger is apparent, but we fear some social or mental threat. Our emotional anxiety can be caused by negative emotions such as sadness, fear, anger, and rejection, to name a few.

Emotional anxiety is normal. However, normally occurring anxiety and anxiety disorders are two very different things. When our emotional anxiety becomes chronic, hard to control, and interferes with daily life–it’s probably an anxiety disorder.

Why Does Anxiety Cause Excessive Sweating?

We have a love/hate relationship with sweat. The body’s sweating mechanism is a marvel of physiological engineering. When triggered by the hypothalamus in the brain, apocrine and eccrine sweat glands secrete sweat. The evaporation of sweat, composed mostly of water, salt and electrolytes, creates a cooling effect that helps maintain body temperature. Sweating at the gym or when working out is desirable and keeps us healthy.

When does sweat turn from desireable to deplorable? When it’s anxiety sweat — sweat that is excessive, embarrassing and only increases its flow when you begin to stress about it.

Stress and anxiety cause the body to secrete the fight or flight hormones that prepare us for action. These hormones cause our breathing rate to increase, our heart to beat faster, our blood pressure to rise, and–you guessed it–our sweat glands are activated to produce more sweat. A lot more. More than we need, and certainly way more sweat than we want.

Why Does Sweating Lead to Anxiety?

Nervous sweating often leads to even more sweating–sometimes uncontrollably–because we feel self-conscious about it during social interaction. It’s a vicious cycle that feeds on itself.

If you suffer from anxiety sweating, this cycle of stress sweat is probably familiar.

You sweat >>> you stress about sweat >>> your stress causes more sweat >>> your sweat causes more stress… you get the picture.

For many of us, stress and anxiety rear their ugly heads when our confidence is low. We wonder if we have what it takes to succeed in a particular set of social circumstances. In a way, our own bodies betray us by signaling to the outside world that we’re nervous. What do those who suffer from social anxiety fear?

Everyday situations that cause social anxiety sweating are:

  • Public speaking
  • Making a request or presenting information
  • Meeting new people
  • Wanting to impress or be accepted
  • Fear of rejection
  • Being judged or evaluated- as in a job interview
  • Looking odd or feeling out of place
  • Being thrust into unfamiliar situations
  • Wanting to be in control

Do I Have Anxiety?

Let’s be clear: Bouts of anxiety are a natural part of life. It’s a normal response to stressful events and situations we all encounter. Family or relationship problems, changing employment and financial worries are some of the common events that can cause anxiety and some degree of anxiety sweating.

But the kind of normal anxiety that we experience from time to time is much different than the kind of chronic, ever-present anxiety that disrupts our lives at every turn. When the symptoms of severe anxiety overshadow the events that caused them and turn everyday life upside down, they could point to an anxiety disorder.

Here are some of the most prevalent signs and symptoms of anxiety disorders:

Excessive Worrying

This kind of worrying is generally linked to anxiety disorders is way out of proportion to the event that triggers it.

Agitation

Anxiety is our way of telling the nervous system that we’re facing some kind of threat. When that happens, blood is diverted away from your digestive system, your heart rate increases as does the rate of your breathing. And, you sweat excessively. While all this may be appropriate and helpful if a real threat is present, it’s debilitating when the threat is only imagined.

Feeling Restless

Restlessness can be a symptom of anxiety disorder, especially when it occurs in children and teens. Not everyone who has been diagnosed with anxiety experience restless feelings, but it is one of the signs doctors look for in diagnosing anxiety.

Fatigue

If you become easily fatigued, it may be a sign of anxiety. It’s often a sign of depression, too.

Difficulty Concentrating

Many people who suffer from anxiety report having trouble concentrating. Studies including children, teens, and adults demonstrate that 60% to 90% of people diagnosed with anxiety have serious difficulty concentrating.

Feeling Irritable

Even those of us who experience normal anxiety levels feel more irritable when we’re feeling anxious. A study including over 6,000 adults found that more than 90% reported having feelings of heightened irritability when their anxiety disorder was in high gear.

Muscle Tension

If your muscles feel tense on most days, that can be another symptom of anxiety disorder. Some doctors have found that treating muscle tension with muscle relaxants can at the same time reduce feelings of anxiety.

Trouble Sleeping

One of the most frequently reported symptoms of anxiety is falling asleep and waking up often during the night. It’s a chicken and egg conundrum. Does anxiety cause insomnia or does insomnia cause anxiety? We just don’t know.

Panic Attacks

Panic disorder is a specific kind of anxiety disorder. A panic attack produces intense episodes of fear. Panic attacks can trigger rapid heartbeat, increased sweating, chest pain, and even nausea.

Fear of Social Situations

Social anxiety disorder is not uncommon and affects an estimated 12% of adults at some point in their lives. If you feel anxious about social events and avoid them, it can be a sign of social anxiety disorder. Fear of being judged, embarrassed, humiliated, or scrutinized by others are red flags that point to social anxiety. Extreme shyness and remaining silent in groups can signal social anxiety, too.

Excessive Sweating

Cold sweats, night sweats, and excessive sweating on the hands, palms, forehead, face, under the arms–and even sweaty feet– can all be symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder. Excessive sweating and uncontrolled sweating could also be caused by hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis is often the root cause of social anxiety.

Diagnosing generalized anxiety disorder includes a physical exam to determine if anxiety might be caused by an underlying medical condition, such as hyperhidrosis, or medications you’re taking. Your medical history and a psychological questionnaire will also be used to arrive at a diagnosis. One such anxiety disorder test includes questions like these:

  • Do a lot of things cause you to worry or feel anxious?
  • Do you think you worry excessively?
  • Do you worry most days?
  • Has it been six months or more that you’ve been worrying like this?
  • Do you have difficulty controlling your worry?
  • Have you noted physical symptoms like, trouble sleeping, feeling restless, chronic fatigue, tense muscles, trouble with concentration or feeling easily irritated?
  • Is your ability to function at work, in social situations, at school or in other areas of importance to you, negatively affected by your worrying?

If you’re wondering if you have an anxiety disorder or if you have anxiety attack symptoms, visit with your doctor. Anxiety disorders and panic attacks can be treated and managed.

What Causes Anxiety?

Stress is the number one cause of anxiety. For those who suffer from anxiety sweating, the phrase, “Don’t sweat it,” seems like mockery. Anxious people stress over almost everything, and that stress makes them sweat. A lot. Learning how to stop stress sweat and finding an effective stress treatment are high priorities.

Stress and sweat travel together, and they’re rarely separated. There are three basic causes of sweat: heat, activity, and–you guessed it–stress. We produce different types of sweat depending on the cause.

Sweat from heat and activity is secreted by the eccrine sweat glands. It is composed of 99% water and small amounts of protein, lipids, and other nutrients. It’s the kind of sweat that cools us down as it evaporates.

In contrast, stress sweat comes from apocrine sweat glands. Of the 2 to 4 million sweat glands that cover our bodies, most are eccrine glands. Apocrine glands are concentrated in areas where there is an abundance of hair follicles, like armpits, and around the genitals. Apocrine glands secrete sweat that is thicker than heat sweat and contains more lipids, nutrients, and proteins. Stress causes the apocrine glands to push stress sweat to the surface of the skin.

Waiting on the skin’s surface is bacteria. When bacteria come into contact with the high levels of protein and nutrients in stress sweat, the bacteria begin to feast. The result is not only unsightly moisture, but it also produces a strong odor. A really bad, offensive odor. To answer the question, “Does stress sweat smell worse than sweat from exercise?” the answer is a resounding YES.

Here’s another interesting tidbit. Recent studies have found that people can tell if sweat odor is caused by emotional stress. Your smelly stress body odor lets everybody know that you’re anxious.

Stress and stress sweat can be caused by perceived physical threats, emotional anxiety, pain, and mental duress. Most of us experience stress sweat before a job interview, making a presentation in a meeting, receiving criticism or evaluation or even running late for an appointment.

How to Stop Stress Sweat

Ideally, the best way to stop anxiety sweating is to simply stop the stress. But for most of us, that’s just not an available option. So, here are a few ways to stop stress sweat and the unpleasant odor it brings:

Deodorants

Deodorants can stop stress sweat odor, although they can’t stop the sweat itself. Fragrances mask the undesirable odor and may help reduce bacteria, but they can’t do anything about those telltale sweat marks around your armpits.

Antiperspirants

Everyday antiperspirants can temporarily block sweat glands when the aluminum chloride ingredient comes in contact with sweat. These products usually contain a fragrance as well.

Prescription-Strength Antiperspirants

Prescription-strength antiperspirant products contain higher concentrations of aluminum chloride and can be purchased without a prescription. A single application can last up to 7 days. Prescription-strength antiperspirants can be an effective stress sweat treatment that works for many who suffer from stress sweating caused by anxiety or hyperhidrosis.

Other Treatments

If you find that antiperspirants or prescription antiperspirants don’t adequately manage or stop your stress sweat, there are other stress sweat treatments. However, these are more invasive and expensive. Treatment options include Botox injections, microwave treatments, and even surgical sweat gland removal.

How to Deal with Anxiety and Stress Sweat

Here are 11 ways to deal with sweat caused by stress and chronic anxiety:

1. Let Go and Relax

Much of the anxiety we all experience from time to time is due to our need to feel in control. Letting go of the urge to control every situation can go a long way to reducing the stress we feel. It sounds overly simplistic but relaxing a little can make a big difference.

2. Meditation, Visualization or Yoga

Meditation can help you contain your anxious feelings and relax your breathing. Relaxed breathing can quell an active stress response and help reduce stress. Visualizing desired outcomes and behavior can help form a healthy response to a stressful situation. Yoga is a mind-body activity that brings together physical activity, breathing control, meditation, and relaxation.

3. Dress to Sweat Less and Stress Less

Wearing loose-fitting clothes that breathes easily can help reduce sweating due to anxiety. Avoid tight-fitting clothing and artificial fabrics that aren’t absorbent and may constrict airflow. Don’t wear the same shoes every day and avoid socks made of cotton as they don’t wick away moisture. Wearing the right socks and changing them often will help keep sweaty feet at bay.

4. Limit “Sweat Triggers” from Your Diet

Your diet and blood sugar level can either help or hinder your efforts to control sweating due to anxiety. Here are some foods and beverages to avoid:

  • Stimulants, like caffeine, can put your nerves on edge. Minimize or eliminate coffee, tea, and caffeinated soft drinks.
  • Fatty, processed foods are low in fiber and harder to digest. Longer digestion times raise your body’s temperature and can trigger more perspiration.
  • Spicy foods.

5. Drink Your Water

Don’t skimp on your water consumption. Water contributes to just about every critical body function. When you don’t get enough water to keep your body running smoothly, it can lead to stress and anxiety. In fact, dehydration and stress go hand-in-hand. Stay hydrated to keep anxiety and sweat at bay.

6. Consider a Home Remedy

Home remedies for controlling sweat include herbal products like sage, chamomile, valerian root, and St. John’s Wort. When applied to the skin, apple cider vinegar is an astringent that can contract skin pores. Tomato juice is thought to have the same astringent effect as apple cider vinegar. Other natural treatments include tea tree oil (another astringent), fresh lemon rubbed on your underarms, and applying cornstarch, baking soda, or baby powder to sweaty areas. These remedies may be less effective if your sweat is caused by an anxiety disorder. But give them a try; they may work for you.

7. Splash Some Cool Water on Your Face and Wrists

Breaking away to a restroom for a few moments to splash some cool water on your face and wrists can help reduce profuse sweating caused by anxiety. Cooling your face and wrists signals the body that its internal temperature is okay. Also, taking, a minute or two away from the action will provide time to take a few deep breaths, slow down your breathing, and can help you relax.

8. Carry a Handkerchief or Baby Wipes

This is a simple but effective way of temporarily dealing with excessive sweat. When you experience forehead sweat or sweaty palms, a handkerchief can mop up profuse sweat before it becomes noticeable. If you can duck into a nearby restroom, a baby wipe can be used to clean up under your arms or wipe away nervous sweating.

9. Use a Prescription-Strength Antiperspirant

Applying a prescription-strength antiperspirant helps prevent sweat before it can cause you anxiety. A prescription-strength antiperspirant, like SweatBlock, can eliminate armpit sweat for up to 7 days. The powerful aluminum chloride ingredient blocks sweat glands and prevents perspiration from reaching the skin’s surface. Wetness and bad odor are prevented before they even happen. And now, there are specially formulated antiperspirant creams that can be applied to the hands and feet as well.

10. Anxiety Medications

If your profuse sweating is caused by stress, anxiety medication may help. Benzodiazepines are often prescribed for panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and social anxiety disorder. Brand names include Xanax, Librium, Klonopin, Valium, and Ativan.

11. Other More Invasive and Expensive Treatments

If none of these remedies are helping you, it may be time to consider other more complex treatments. These medical treatments can be expensive and require a doctor’s care.

Botox Injections

Botox is a neurotoxin made from botulism microbes. Botox injected directly into the areas where sweating is a problem blocks the nerves from communicating with the sweat glands. While effective, Botox injections must be repeated every 6 months or so to prevent chronic anxiety sweat.

Microwave Therapy

Microwave therapy makes use of a device that sucks sweat glands close to the surface of the skin and then destroys them with microwave energy. A qualified doctor must perform this procedure.

Anticholinergic Drugs

Anticholinergic drugs work to block the hormone the nervous system uses to send signals to your sweat glands. When the signals are blocked, you don’t experience sweating of any kind. These drugs are expensive and come with a number of unwanted side effects.

Sweat Gland Surgery

As a final and last resort, doctors can surgically remove your sweat glands from the sites most prone to excessive and uncontrolled sweating. There are some potentially serious drawbacks to this procedure, and that’s why it’s reserved for only the most serious cases.

Dealing with Anxiety Sweating

Everybody experiences anxiety from time to time. But when anxiety takes control of your life and leads to excessive sweating (which in turn causes more anxiety), there are steps you can take to minimize your stress and calm your sweat glands.

The information in this article should better inform and educate about anxiety sweating and what can be done to curtail or eliminate it. Seek to understand the cause of your anxiety and try these tips for reducing sweating and staying calm. One of these solutions is bound to work for you. Think how much better life could be when anxiety sweating is no longer a problem. With the help of these remedies, you’ll be able to calm your mind–and your sweat glands.

Are you afraid to raise your arms? Do you often wear a coat or jacket to hide your sweaty armpits– even when it’s hot? Is your excessive armpit sweat always on your mind? If so, you’re among the millions of people who want to know why– and how– to stop sweaty underarms.

Why Do Armpits Sweat So Much?

Apocrine sweat glands are the real culprits when it comes to armpit sweat. Apocrine glands are found in high concentrations in the armpits, the groin, and areas around the nipples and breasts. Apocrine glands are a dual threat: Not only are they the cause for embarrassing and excessive underarm sweating, but the sweat from these glands also smells bad when it comes into contact with bacteria lying in wait on your skin. Soaked armpits and BO (body odor) are traveling companions. Fortunately, both can be controlled or eliminated.

sweaty armpits

Profuse armpit sweating can be caused by several factors:

Nervous Sweating

Whether it’s a job interview, first date, or an important business presentation, anxiety can cause nervous sweating, especially under the arms. If you are embarrassed by your sweating, that can make you even more nervous– which leads to more sweating. It’s a vicious cycle. When the stress or anxiety ends, so does the excessive armpit sweat.

Hot, Humid Environments

What happens to us on hot, sweltering days? Tidal waves of sweat wash over our us, making armpit sweat even worse. Like automatic sprinklers, your sweat glands turn on full blast until you cool down. Even though it’s healthy and normal, visible sweat is often embarrassing.

Physical Exercise

When you work out or engage in any strenuous exercise, eccrine sweat glands work overtime to stabilize body temperature. Your hypothalamus, which acts as your body’s thermometer, signals your sweat glands to secrete increased amounts of salty, smelly perspiration. Your heart rate increases, your blood pressure spikes, and you start breathing heavily. This elevated activity tells your sweat glands to pump harder.

Diet

Your diet matters– you really are what you eat, as the saying goes. Your eating habits can have a significant impact on your sweating.

Pregnancy

When you’re pregnant, hormone levels go bonkers, your metabolism can go wacky, and your blood pressure climbs. This causes your body to produce more sweat. But not to worry– in nine months, these bodily functions should normalize.

Menopause

Ladies, menopause plays havoc with your hormones, especially estrogen. The most common symptoms of hormonal changes are hot flashes and increased sweating. As far as hormones are concerned, menopause is a lot like pregnancy and will normalize in time.

Diabetes

Two things frequently happen to people with diabetes. First, diabetics tend to be overweight. Second, diabetic neuropathy caused by higher than normal levels of glucose can occur. Normal nerve function can be adversely affected if blood sugar levels stay high for too long. These two physiological factors dramatically increase the likelihood of increased sweating.

Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis is a medical situation known for excessive and uncontrolled sweating, usually with no discernible cause. Axillary hyperhidrosis, the medical term for excessive armpit sweat, is profuse and uncontrolled sweating of the underarms. While it’s a physiological condition, people who have it affirm that it also negatively affects their quality of life– physically, socially, emotionally and psychologically.

9 Ways to Stop Sweaty Armpits:

Knowing what causes armpit sweat is all well and good. But knowing how to stop sweating is even better. Most of these remedies can be accomplished at home without seeing a doctor or undergoing an invasive treatment. A few remedies will require a doctor’s care. Read on and see which remedies may be right for you.

1. Stay Hydrated to Reduce Underarm Sweating

Drinking lots of cool water throughout the day will help maintain your body’s internal temperature and control the sweating mechanism. Ample hydration can short circuit the body’s nervous system response to factors that trigger sweating by keeping body temperature lower, which in turn, reduces sweat production.

How much water should you drink? As much as it takes to prevent thirst, and enough so that your urine is more on the clear side than on the yellow. For some of us, this means drinking more than we’re used to. The rule of thumb, according to conventional wisdom, is to drink eight 8-ounce glasses of water every day. If you know you’ll be in a situation or environment that will create more sweating, drink even more.

2. Wear Breathable Clothing

Another natural and often effective way to combat excessive sweating is found in the clothes you wear. Your choice of clothing can either increase perspiration in the underarm areas, or help you feel more comfortable and confident.

Clothing made from natural materials will help you stay cooler and avoid sweaty armpits, reducing those nasty sweat stains. Fabrics such as cotton, wool, silk, and linen weave together more loosely, enabling them to breathe. These natural fibers also absorb moisture. By keeping moisture off the skin, you can prevent sweat from mixing with the bacteria that causes a strong smell and brings unwanted attention.

On the other hand, clothing made from man-made fibers like nylon, rayon, and polyester doesn’t breathe well. These artificial materials are woven together much more tightly and actually prevent moisture from evaporating. Do we need to go into detail about what trapped heat and moisture in and around your armpits will do to your social life? Global climate change is bad enough without creating a mini-greenhouse effect in your underarms.

To be fair, there are some man-made microfiber fabrics that are designed to wick away moisture from the skin so it can evaporate more quickly. If you’re going to wear clothing made from artificial fibers, make sure it’s not going to make life more difficult.

3. Use Antiperspirant

One of the questions we hear most often is “what’s the best deodorant for sweaty armpits?” You probably already use a deodorant every day to prevent embarrassing body odor. Deodorants are a one-trick-pony, however, and only cover up the odor. While stopping odor is good, stopping sweat is better.

For that, you need more than a deodorant: You need an antiperspirant. Deodorant and antiperspirant are not the same, learn more here.

An antiperspirant containing some form of aluminum salt compound (usually aluminum chloride) can reduce underarm sweat. Antiperspirants are available in many forms, including roll-ons, sprays, and solid rub-on sticks. There are formulations specifically designed for men and for women. They are readily available in every grocery store and drug store.

The aluminum chloride (or similar) ingredient works to block sweat glands in the armpits. When aluminum chloride comes into contact with water, it combines with moisture in perspiration to create a gel-like plug that temporarily blocks the sweat glands. Since sweat cannot reach the skin’s surface, you stay dry.

Everyday antiperspirants can be an effective armpit sweat treatment for those who don’t sweat excessively. The plugs dissipate over time, so everyday antiperspirants are just that– they must be applied every day. And, be careful: You’ll want to wait a day or so after shaving your armpits, as antiperspirants can cause mild skin irritation.

4. Try a Clinical or Prescription Strength Antiperspirant

For many of us, everyday antiperspirants are just not enough. If that’s true for you and your armpits feel like a wet sauna all the time, you may want to try a prescription strength antiperspirant. These antiperspirants contain higher concentrations of aluminum chloride.

These are the strongest antiperspirants you can get without having to visit your doctor. Because clinical strength antiperspirants are more powerful, they’re an ideal solution for people who suffer from excessive armpit sweating or axillary hyperhidrosis.

5. Learn to Manage Stress and Anxiety

Stress seems to be inescapable. Public speaking, meeting new people, a job interview, family concerns, or just trying to get through traffic can cause stress, anxiety, and nervous sweating. When you become anxious, the flight responses kick in– your breathing rate increases, your heart begins to race, your mouth suddenly feels like the Mojave Desert, and– you guessed it– your sweat glands switch into overdrive.

How can we sweat less when faced with stressful situations? Try to understand what triggers your anxiety, so you can stay relaxed. Letting go of the constant need to be in control can help quiet your body’s response to anxiety.

Other important elements of stress management include proper exercise, getting enough sleep, and replacing negative thoughts with optimistic ones. You may find meditation or yoga helpful in managing anxiety. Find what works for you and your armpits will stay drier.

6. Is Your Diet to Blame for Sweaty Armpits?

Are you one of those people who finds that certain foods and beverages cause more underarm sweat? Some of the things we take into our bodies not only cause us to sweat more profusely, but they cause us to smell bad too. Among the repeat offenders are caffeinated beverages, alcoholic drinks, onions, garlic, and peppers.

It might not be too much of an exaggeration to say that the world runs on caffeine. It’s in hot morning beverages, soft drinks, energy drinks, and countless other beverages and snacks. If your morning starts with a few cups of coffee, and your day is punctuated with a popular caffeinated soft drink or two, you have an important choice to make.

Coffee and tea not only raise your internal temperature, but the caffeine they contain sends your sweat glands into high gear. Additional sources of caffeine throughout the day certainly don’t help. Spicy foods can also cause your body to pump out more sweat. Peppers contain a compound called capsaicin, which can signal your sweat glands to work harder. Changing your diet can help reduce sweating.

7. Check Your Medications

If you’re sweating more than usual– not just in your armpits, but on your feet, palms, groin, neck, or thighs– you might want to reevaluate the medications you’re taking. Here’s a list of some most common medications known to cause excessive sweating.

  • Antidepressants
  • Migraine Medications
  • Pain Relievers
  • Diabetes Medication
  • Asthma Inhalers
  • Heartburn and Reflux Medicine
  • Sildenafil (Viagra)
  • Breast Cancer Medications

8. See Your Doctor

Unrelenting and excessive sweating may be caused by an underlying illness or condition. A visit to your doctor is the best way to determine if there’s something more than sweating occurring. Excessive sweating for men and women can be caused by heart disease, thyroid problems, hypoglycemia, leukemia, tuberculosis, and other disorders.

Hyperhidrosis is another condition responsible for excessive sweating. Primary focal hyperhidrosis affects a certain area (or areas) of the body. Excessive armpit sweating is called axillary hyperhidrosis, which is a form of primary focal hyperhidrosis.

The second form hyperhidrosis is called generalized hyperhidrosis, and it affects the entire body. This type of hyperhidrosis is often caused by an underlying illness or condition. Your doctor will be able to accurately diagnose any illnesses or condition that may be responsible for your excessive sweating.

9. Consider Other Medical Solutions

If none of the remedies we’ve discussed so far helps reduce your excessive armpit sweating, you may want to explore more expensive and invasive ways of reducing underarm sweat.

Botox Treatments
Botox (Botulinum Toxin) is best known as a treatment for reducing wrinkles. Botox can also reduce the effects of excessive sweating, especially in the armpits, by temporarily disrupting the chemical substance that signals armpit sweat glands. Botox treatments for excessive underarm sweat are temporary and must be repeated every 6 to 12 months.

Nerve-Blocking Medications for Hyperhidrosis
Some medications taken orally can block the chemicals that allow certain nerves to communicate with each other. These are called anticholinergics. The effects are similar to those achieved through Botox injections. The medication works by blocking the chemical acetylcholine in its travel to the receptors on the sweat glands. These drugs are not for everyone and they do come with unwanted side effects.

Topically applied anticholinergics, like Qbrexza (recently FDA approved), are also available for axillary hyperhidrosis.

Microwave Treatments for Excessive Sweating Symptoms
If the thought of having your armpit sweat glands microwaved (or nuked in today’s vernacular), doesn’t bother you, this approach might work. Treatments like miraDry use microwave energy to destroy the sweat glands responsible for underarm sweat. After local anesthesia is administered by your doctor, a vacuum-like hand-held device is used to pull sweat glands close to the surface of the skin. While the device cools the upper layers of your skin, the microwaves destroy the sweat glands in your underarms.

Sweat Gland Removal Surgery
Extremely severe underarm sweating may be treated by permanently removing sweat glands. The procedure requires the services of a plastic surgeon. Either a traditional surgical approach or a less invasive treatment called “suction curettage” can be used. Suction curettage is a modified form of liposuction. It’s an outpatient treatment so there’s no need to spend a night in the hospital.

Do you sweat when you’re nervous, stressed or anxious?

Does internal panic ensue at the slightest sign of sweat on your brow or the palms of your hands?

Do you melt with perspiration just thinking about your next social interaction?

It may not make you feel any better, but a lot of people experience this same kind of extreme, anxious sweating.

Some sweat is good… in fact, it’s critical to your health. But marathon-like sweating during a job interview or after a simple handshake is NOT good… EVER!

You should only sweat like you’ve just run a marathon… after running a marathon. Right?!

The truth is nervous sweat is a major distraction to living the life you want. It can negatively affect your career, social life, and relationships.

We think it’s unfair. Why should some people sweat more than others? Why does a pair of sweaty armpits get to dictate how you feel about yourself and how others feel about you?

If nervous sweat is a constant thorn in your side, here’s a few tips that might help calm your nerves and curb the sweat.

Quick Tips: 7 Ways to Stop Nervous Sweating

1. Don’t Panic

Don’t panic at the first drop of sweat. The fear of sweat is often the reason we end up sweating like a cold can of soda on sweltering day. The key is to prevent your body from switching into “fight or flight” mode. This survival mechanism will ultimately lead to increased breathing, blood flow, and sweating.

It may take some jedi mind trickery, but you need to FORGET the SWEAT. Convince yourself that sweat is no big deal and that your current situation (first date, job interview, etc…) doesn’t require you to run or fight for your life. Stay calm and don’t panic.

2. Relaxation + Meditation

When you feel a bit worked up, try a relaxation techniques to help you stay calm such as focusing on your breathing. Take slow, deep breaths, hold the breath in for a few seconds, and then, release it. Repeat the process until you feel calm again. Deep breathing slows down your heart rate, which in turn, helps prevent anxious sweating. Also, consider adding meditation sessions to your normal routine to help keep any unwanted stress at bay.

3. Exercise + Weight Loss

Regular exercise can help manage sweat-inducing stress. Less stress can result in less sweating. Another benefit of exercise is potential weight loss and increased confidence. The more confidence you have, the better you can handle potentially stressful situations.

4. Know your Sweat Triggers

Certain things can trigger excess sweat. Knowing these triggers can help you avoid sweaty situations and prepare for the unavoidable ones. Common sweat triggers include job interviews, dates and speaking in public. Some not-so-obvious triggers include caffeine, alcohol, spicy foods, and processed junk food. Medications, your clothes … even your very thoughts can trigger abnormal sweating. Know your sweat triggers and avoid them if possible.

5. Stay Hydrated

Drink plenty of H2O to keep your body temperature cool. This will reduce the amount of heat your body has to release in the form of sweat on your skin.

6. Be Prepared, Arm Yourself with a Strong Antiperspirant

Life happens. You can’t avoid every potentially stressful situation and you can’t live the rest of your days out in a cave. One way to combat nervous sweating is by using a clinical strength antiperspirant like SweatBlock. Unlike deodorants that simply mask odor, antiperspirants have the ability to block sweat. Arm yourself with a strong antiperspirant to reduce sweat and boost confidence.

7. Dress Strategically

The strategy here is to dress in a way that doesn’t produce more sweat and doesn’t promote nervous sweat. Wear light, breathable fabrics that keep you cool. Wear patterns, darks, blacks or light jackets to hide sweat. Don’t promote your sweaty armpits by wearing solid colors, grays, and light blues. For sweaty hands and face, keep a handkerchief handy. You can quickly wipe away sweat before it compounds into extreme sweat.

Why We Sweat When We’re Nervous

Any type of excessive sweating can be embarrassing, but nervous sweating is probably the worst. Just think about it for a minute.

Have you ever…

• Dealt with clammy hands on a first date?

• Had beads of sweat appear all over your forehead before giving an important presentation at work?

• Felt really anxious about something, and then, noticed that your feet are suddenly sliding around in puddles of sweat?

It’s not fun. But you don’t have to stop living your life to the fullest because of it either. Instead, learn more about why you’re prone to nervous sweating and how to deal with it once and for all.

Can Being Nervous Cause Sweating?

When you’re nervous it activates your stress hormones. And when activated, those hormones cause your body temperature and heart rate to increase slightly. This sends a message to your sweat glands telling them it’s time to produce sweat to cool your body off a bit.

Unfortunately, this isn’t a process that you can control. The best thing you can do to avoid nervous sweating completely is to practice different stress and anxiety-relieving techniques, such as deep breathing, to keep yourself as calm as possible. If you do this every time you start to feel nervous, stressed, or anxious, there’s a good chance you can prevent nervous sweating altogether. But if it doesn’t work, there are plenty of other things you can try too.

What Causes Nervous Sweating?

When it comes to being nervous, anxious, or stressed, everyone has their own triggers. You might become really nervous before an important meeting or before you have to give a big speech, while others may be really nervous when they meet someone for the first time or any time they go on a date. Of course, if you’re in a situation that makes you nervous, the last thing you want to do is start sweating profusely.

Unfortunately, all of these feelings send red flags to your body telling it that you’re on the brink of overheating. So your body starts producing extra sweat in an effort to stay cool. It’s a completely natural process that’s totally annoying and embarrassing.

When you know you’ll be faced with a circumstance that’s a trigger for you, do everything you can to remain calm. The calmer you stay, the less likely you are to start sweating. We know this can be hard to do. To help, wipe your problem areas down with a SweatBlock towelette in advance if possible. This will reduce the amount of sweat your body produces, giving you one less thing to be stressed about.

Which Nervous System Controls Sweating?

The sympathetic nervous system controls sweating. It’s part of the autonomic nervous system, which controls your body functions that you don’t consciously direct such as your heartbeat and breathing.

The sympathetic nervous system is the portion of the autonomic nervous system that triggers your body’s fight-or-flight response. So any time you’re nervous, scared, anxious, or stressed, it tells your sweat glands to start working so that you don’t overheat internally. Basically, this system works to protect you from the inside out.

How to Treat Nervous Sweating

There are several ways to treat nervous sweating, but there isn’t one treatment or remedy that works for everyone. So it’s important to try different types of treatments until you find one that works for your body. For most people, it’s a combination of home remedies or antiperspirants and prevention techniques.

How to Calm Nervous Sweating

The key to calming nervous sweating is calming yourself. You can’t control the amount of sweat your body produces, but you can control the way you feel — to an extent. There are two ways you should approach this problem.

First, you should try to work on the reason you’re nervous in certain situations. For example, if you get so nervous during dates that you get really sweaty hands, you might want to try working on your confidence. Consider making it a point to talk to strangers casually as much as possible. Eventually, you’ll start feeling comfortable and confident holding conversations with people you don’t know well. The added confidence you gain can help stay calm on your next date. The same technique can be used if you’re nervous about speaking in front of an audience. Practice your speeches at home, in front of friends and family members, and work your way up to speaking in front of larger crowds.

In addition to working on the main causes of your nervousness, you should practice calming techniques. These can help calm you down any time you find yourself in a situation that makes you feel nervous.

Take slow, deep breaths until you feel yourself calm down.

Remove yourself from the situation for a few minutes to give yourself time to calm down.

Practice mindfulness meditation to focus on the present. This allows you to focus on the moment realistically, instead of focusing on your fears or expectations surrounding the moment. To do this, focus on specific sights or sounds nearby. This brings you back into the present moment and gets you out of your head.

How to Stop Nervous Sweating Naturally

To stop nervous sweating naturally, the best thing to do is work on your mindset. You get nervous because you have specific thoughts, expectations, or fears surrounding certain tasks or events. For example, if you constantly think that other people are judging you or have a bad perception of you, it may make you nervous to speak in front of groups or meet new people. It’s thoughts like these that are rooted in your anxiety. If you make a conscious effort to flip the negative thoughts into positive ones, you’ll start to feel more confident and are less likely to become nervous.

Additionally, you can try different home remedies designed to keep you calm such as:

Eat more fish. Omega-3 fatty acids work to protect against depression and anxiety.

Eat a protein-filled breakfast every day. Low levels of choline are associated with increased anxiety, and eating protein at breakfast helps regulate your levels throughout the day.

Grab a snack. Anxiety and nervousness often set in when your blood sugar levels are a bit low, so grab a quick snack.

Exercise regularly. When you exercise on a regular basis it helps eliminate lingering depression and anxiety. It makes you feel healthier, which automatically boosts your self-esteem.

Use a clinical-strength antiperspirant, such as SweatBlock, to keep the sweat at bay.

Preventing Nervous Sweating on the Face

When your nervous sweat appears on your head, face, or neck, it’s hard to hide — which of course, makes it even more embarrassing. Fortunately, there are a few things you can do to help prevent nervous sweating on your face.

Our top recommendation for head, face, and neck sweating is using SweatBlock — and no we aren’t just tooting our own horn. It actually does work. Before you go to bed at night, wipe down your face and neck with a SweatBlock towelette. Then, go to sleep and let SweatBlock work its magic. When you’re sleeping, your sweat glands aren’t as active. So the clinical-strength antiperspirant on the towelette can easily get into your pores. While one nighttime treatment is enough to reduce the amount of sweat you produce for between four and seven days, you can also carry a SweatBlock towelette with you — just in case.

Speaking of towelettes, you can also carry alcohol wipes with you to use in the event of an emergency. If a situation arises that makes you nervous, quickly wiping down your face with an alcohol wipe will close your pores so excessive amounts of sweat can’t escape. If you wear makeup, consider wiping your face down with an alcohol wipe before applying your makeup to close your pores. Keep in mind though, alcohol is very drying. You might want to also use a lightweight moisturizer to keep your skin hydrated properly.

You should also drink plenty of water throughout the day to stay hydrated. When your body is properly hydrated, your body temperature doesn’t rise as easily. And because you produce sweat when your body temperature starts to rise, it’s important to keep your internal temperature as cool as possible to prevent sweating. Also, avoid eating food that’s spicy, hot, or filled with sodium. They automatically make your body temperature rise a bit.

If you can’t find a natural remedy for nervous sweating on your head, neck, or face, you might consider getting botox treatments. When used to treat excessive sweating, botox treatments are done a bit differently than they are when they are used to get rid of wrinkles and age lines. The botox gets injected at specific points, numbing the nerves in the area completely. This way, when your brain tries to signal the nerves to produce sweat, it doesn’t work.

Dealing with Sweaty Hands

It’s common for people struggling with nervous sweating to get clammy hands regularly. This can make a simple handshake practically unbearable. Unfortunately, if the thought of shaking someone’s hand makes you panic, you automatically produce more sweat. And because there are more sweat glands in the palms of your hands than other areas of your body, your hands can get sweaty real quick.

Basically, it’s a Catch-22. The more you worry about your clammy hands, the more they sweat. So what do you do? Well, you don’t have let the thought of having sweaty hands deter you. Instead, follow these tips to reduce the amount of sweat your hands produce.

1. Carry Alcohol Wipes

Wipe your hands with alcohol wipes to dry out your hands before important social interactions. It’s a very temporary fix, but it may just help you avoid some akward handshakes and handholding. Alcohol based hand sanitizers can also work.

2. Use a Hand Antiperspirant

Want a more effective treatment for sweaty hands? Try a strong topical antiperspirant for hands. We recommend Carpe hand antiperspirant.

3. Use Baby Powder to Absorb Hand Sweat

If you feel like your hands are starting to get clammy, rub a bit of baby powder between them to absorb any excess moisture. Consider carrying a travel-size bottle with you or keeping one in your desk at work to use as needed.

4. Soak your hands in vinegar

Soak your hands in a mixture of warm water and white vinegar two to three times per week for about 20 minutes. The warm water opens your pores, allowing the white vinegar to work its way into them. When you remove your hands from the mixture, run them under cold water for about 20 seconds to close your pores back up. The white vinegar helps reduce the amount of sweat your palms produce and closing up the pores when you’re done, prevent sweat from seeping out of them. This is also a good option for anyone with excessively sweaty feet.

How to Combat Nervous Sweating in Public

If you’re worried about nervous sweating in public situations, it’s important to do whatever you can to reduce the amount of sweat your body produces before you leave your home. The more prepared you are, the easier it is to avoid profuse sweating in public, and if it does happen, you won’t need to worry because you’ve already prepared yourself to hide it.

Wear an undershirt beneath your clothing to trap excess sweat before it can stain your outer layer of clothing. This helps prevent embarrassing pit stains or sweat stains on other parts of your clothes.

Wear sweat guards underneath your clothes. Sweat guards are made to sit in the armpit area of your shirt. They absorb excess sweat so that it doesn’t stain your clothing and isn’t noticeable to people around you.

Use clinical-strength antiperspirant. You can purchase a deodorant that includes a clinical-strength antiperspirant to use on your underarm area. Or you can purchase antiperspirant wipes, such as SweatBlock, to use on other areas of your body.

Do your best to stay out of the heat and sun. The cooler you are, the less sweat your body produces. So you don’t want to do anything that causes you to sweat more.

Discuss Nervous Sweating With Your Doctor

It’s common for people battling nervous sweating to avoid talking to others about it because they are embarrassed or feel alone. But the condition is actually really common, and your doctor may be able to help you with the problem.

In most cases, doctors and dermatologists suggest that their patients try different remedies before they prescribe medication. But if you’ve already exhausted every home remedy you know and clinical-strength antiperspirant isn’t working, it might be time for a prescription.

Because your excessive sweating is caused by your nervousness, your doctor may suggest an anti-depressant or anti-anxiety medication to help regulate your moods.

There are also oral prescription medications that reduce the amount of sweat you produce, but your doctor may feel that a topical prescription medication is the better option for you.

Topical prescription meds come in cream form and can be applied as needed. So before you go into a situation that you know will make you nervous, simply apply the cream to the areas of your body that sweat the most. The cream works in the same way as an alcohol wipe or SweatBlock towelettes. It closes the pores and dries up the area to keep it sweat free. The only difference is that instead of being clinical strength, the medication is prescription strength, which is why it’s typically used only when other options aren’t working.

Ultimately, the key to combating nervous sweating is to do whatever you can to remain as calm as possible. If that’s not possible, you should try a combination of natural treatments to combat your excessive sweating. And if all else fails, consult your doctor. He or she may be able to prescribe medication that helps prevent you from sweating so much.

Excessive underarm sweating is “the pits” – pun intended.

If you’ve ever suffered through an embarrassing sweaty hug, an awkward high-five, or a sweat-soaked job interview — this article is for you.

First, a question: What would freedom from excessive sweat mean to you?

More confidence? Less embarrassment? More living? Less hiding?

Or maybe it’s as simple as just wearing what you want without the worry of perspiration.

Let’s be honest: stopping unwanted sweat and regaining lost confidence can be “game-changing”.

Six tips to help you stop sweating so much:

  • 1. Use a strong antiperspirant.
  • 2. Apply antiperspirant correctly to maximize effectiveness.
  • 3. Dress strategically to reduce and conceal sweat.
  • 4. Manage diet to minimize sweat – Avoid sweat triggers.
  • 5. Exercise frequently to combat stress sweat.
  • 6. Relax – Don’t “sweat” your sweat.

Other helpful things we’ll cover…

  • 7. Home remedies for excessive sweating.
  • 8. Medications to control sweat.
  • 9. Advanced treatments for hyperhidrosis.

Before we go any further, you should take a look at this article about excessive sweating causes. Knowing the “why” to your sweat problem is an important step in choosing an effective treatment.

1. Use a Strong Antiperspirant

Antiperspirant Comparison Lineup.
Are you serious about stopping excessive armpit sweat? Take that chalky, shirt-staining antiperspirant / deodorant combo and chuck it out the window. You need a strong solution specifically designed to stop sweat — a clinical strength antiperspirant.

It’s not uncommon for people to reach for a deodorant to prevent sweating. Unfortunately, deodorants can only mask the smell of bacteria-laced sweat, not prevent it.

Remember: Deodorant stops smell. Antiperspirant stops sweat.

You might have also discovered that drug-store antiperspirants just aren’t effective. They do more shirt-staining than actual sweat blocking.

The best antiperspirants will likely contain higher levels of aluminum chloride. (Aluminum chloride does the actual blocking of sweat).

If you suffer from excessive sweating or hyperhidrosis, look for an antiperspirant with at least 14% aluminum chloride.

Many effective over-the-counter solutions are available. If you need something even stronger, your doctor can recommend a prescription antiperspirant.

Pssst: Did you know there’s an antiperspirant that stops excessive sweat for up to 7 days? Try it today!

2. Apply Antiperspirant Correctly

Apply Antiperspirant.
Did you know you’ve most likely been using antiperspirant all wrong?

And you’re not alone…

Most of us wake up in the morning, take a shower, apply some antiperspirant and get on with the day. If you’re doing this, you’re doing it wrong.

Want to get the most out of your antiperspirant? Follow these simple steps:

  • Apply at night (or before bed): Your antiperspirant needs time and a dry surface to effectively block sweat. At night, temperatures are lower and it’s the time of day when people are less active. A full night of sleep plus lower sweat levels gives the antiperspirant ample time to work its magic.
  • Apply on a clean, dry skin surface: Make sure your underarms (or other body parts) are dirt and residue free. Even the slightest residue from deodorant could sabotage your antiperspirants sweat-stopping abilities. For best results, shower and ensure your underarms are completely dry before applying antiperspirant.
  • Optimal skin contact: Antiperspirant works best when it has optimal contact with the skin surface. Not surprisingly, hairy armpits can prevent this from happening. For best results, consider trimming or shaving that flattering underarm hairdo. Warning: Do not apply antiperspirant immediately after shaving. Wait at least 24 hours to avoid unnecessary skin irritation.
  • Don’t give up if antiperspirant doesn’t stop sweat instantly: Don’t lose hope if the sweat keeps flowing after just one application of antiperspirant. For some, it can take three to four days of consistent use to achieve desired results. Once the antiperspirant starts working, you can apply as needed.
  • Be smart: If your antiperspirant is causing severe skin irritation or burning – STOP using it. Not everything works for everyone. Test antiperspirant on a small area of skin before applying to all your problem areas.

3. Dress Strategically:

Stop Sweat, Dress Strategically.
As the weather changes, so does your wardrobe. You dress light when it’s hot, and bundle up when it’s cold.

For a lot of us, excessive sweating just happens. It doesn’t matter how hot it is, how cold it is, if you’re running a marathon or sitting on the couch – the sweat comes… and comes…

It doesn’t hurt to have a few wardrobe tricks up your sleeve to conceal and reduce sweating when it matters most.

Dress in light, breathable fabrics with ample ventilation.

This keeps the temperature down and the air flowing to help reduce sweat levels. A word of caution, sporting a tank top to your next job interview may not be appropriate or effective.

Avoid these sweat amplifying colors when possible.

If you have an important engagement or social event – ditch the light blues, grays, and bright colors. They’ll betray you and steal your confidence faster than you can say “whoa nellie!”

Keep these sweat-concealing colors and styles handy.

Dark blues, blacks, dark colors and distracting patterns are excellent sweat-camouflage. Jackets, hoodies and sweatshirts are always useful in keeping sweat marks hidden.

But seriously, let’s just forget this whole “dressing strategically” bit. Grab a strong antiperspirant and you’ll be able to wear what you want, where you want, without the worry of sweat. We’ve heard this one is pretty good ;).

4. Manage Diet to Manage Sweat

Avoid foods that make you sweat more.
Your diet can influence your health, your physique, and your sweat levels. Eating certain foods can make you sweat more than normal. Avoiding other foods can help you sweat less.

Make these tweaks to your diet and it just may solve your sweat problem(s).

  • Stay Hydrated: Aside from keeping you alive, water provides other useful benefits. In this instance, it helps cool your body. Lower core temperature means your body doesn’t have to sweat as much to release extra heat. On the other hand, dehydration can lead to more sweating. Moral of the story, drink plenty of water and you’ll sweat a lot less. You may have heard the eight cups a day rule, but experts suggest nine cups for women and 13 for men.
  • Avoid Spicy Foods: Your body reacts to spicy food the same way it would to a hot, sunny day. It makes you sweat, even if the outside temperature is cold.
  • Cut down on deep fried, fatty, processed foods: Avoid fast foods, chocolate, white bread, junk food, and other carb-loaded comfort foods. Some people swear that a low carb/no carb lifestyle can be a cure for excessive sweating.
  • Avoid Caffeine-Loaded Coffee & Energy Drinks: Unfortunately, your morning coffee isn’t just good for extra energy – it’s also great for extra sweat.
  • Take Vitamin B: Vitamin B helps your organs and other vital systems function properly. So when you have enough vitamin B in your body, it doesn’t work as hard, which of course means you produce less sweat. Even better, adding a vitamin B tablet to your daily routine can also give you more energy throughout the day.
  • Eat Your Fruits and Veggies: Eating fruits and vegetables is a great way to reduce the amount of sweat your body generates. Fruits and veggies can help aid in the digestion process and give you essential vitamins. If your digestion if off, your body automatically produces excess sweat.
  • Fruits and veggies that promote healthy digestion: Cucumbers, Celery, Watermelon, Spinach, Lettuce,
    Grapefruit, Bell Peppers, Olive Oil

5. Exercise regularly to combat stress sweat

Reduce stress sweat with exercise.
Typically, we don’t think of exercise as a way of reducing sweat. But in this case, it can do exactly that.

Here’s how:

First, exercise can lower the stress hormone cortisol. Second, exercise can trigger the release of endorphins. Endorphins reduce your perception of pain, help you relax, and provide a feeling of satisfaction, kind of like morphine.

Lower stress hormone levels combined with the release of endorphins puts your body at ease. This can minimize the chance of an excessive sweat response to everyday stressors.

Less stressing = less sweating.

6. Relax – Don’t “sweat” your sweat.

Stress Sweat.
Stressing about your sweat will only make it worse. We call this the stress/sweat cycle. You sweat — your sweat leads to stress — then your stress leads to even more sweat… etc.. etc… etc…

Learn how to manage your stress and you’ll be one step closer to managing unwanted sweat.

Here’s the key: you need to trick your body into thinking common stressors are no big deal. Common stressors include job interviews, first dates, sales calls, tests, etc… (whatever stresses you out)

Nervous sweat or stress sweat happens when your body mistakenly thinks it’s in danger. A date or job interview are hardly dangerous.

Follow these steps to keep your body from going into full-blown panic mode when you encounter potential stressors:

Prepare: Before you encounter a stressful situation, study your thoughts. Ask yourself, what do you really have to be nervous about? Write it down. Once you’ve established the source of your stress, it becomes easier to dispel it.

Practice the meditation techniques below to prepare your mind for potentially stressful situations.

Breath: Tell yourself to breathe. It’s not uncommon for people to unknowingly hold their breath when under stress. Taking a slow, deep breath tells your body that it’s not in any sort of danger. Inhale deeply and slowly through your nose, hold your breath for three seconds, then exhale slowly through your mouth. Repeat this 10 times.

Focus on the Moment: Don’t get caught up in all the worst-case scenarios that stress puts you through. If you let yourself get carried away, you’ll end up sweating over those “what ifs” and lose focus on the moment at hand.

Don’t Obsess Over the Sweat: If you start to sweat, don’t worry about it. You don’t need to add another layer of worry to the stress ball which induced the sweating in the first place. Don’t let uninvited sweat marks distract you from important things in life.

7. Home Remedies to Stop Sweating

sage tea excessive sweating home remedy

If you’re prone to excessive sweating, there are home remedies that can help.

For the sake of transparency: These remedies are not lab tested, medically based, or proven to be effective on a large scale. It doesn’t mean they don’t work.

But, It’s important to remember that not all home remedies will work for everyone. Body chemistry varies from person to person. Some sweat more than others and for very different reasons. That’s why not every home remedy will control sweat for everyone.

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar is a natural astringent. When applied topically, it tightens skin pores and helps control sweat production. It can also help rid your body of odor-causing bacteria by balancing pH levels of the body. In a way, it’s a natural antiperspirant and deodorizer.

To apply vinegar to your skin:
1) Soak a cotton ball in apple cider vinegar until it’s fully saturated.
2) Apply apple cider vinegar to your problem areas at night just before you go to bed.

In the morning, wash the vinegar off of your skin before you start getting ready for the day.

If you prefer, you can also drink the apple cider vinegar, but be warned; it doesn’t taste like apple cider. Simply mix a couple of tablespoons of apple cider vinegar and honey into a glass of water and drink it daily. It helps to dry out your skin, which prevents sweat from coming through your pores.

Sage Tea

Sage is one of the better herbal remedies for excessive sweating. It contains a natural astringent called tannic acid. Tannic acid has the ability to constrict and shrink your skin and pores. This shrinking helps reduce sweat just like an antiperspirant. Sage also helps kill odor-causing bacteria found in the armpits and feet.

Sage for Sweaty Armpits…
Add two sage tea bags to two cups of boiling water. Let steep and cool to room temperature. Dab generously on underarms with clean towel. Repeat two or more times daily for best results.

Sage for Sweaty Hands and Feet…
Add four to five sage tea bags to a quart of boiling water. Let the tea steep until it’s cool enough to touch. Once cooled, soak your hands/feet in the sage solution for 30 minutes. Repeat his process daily (multiple times daily for best results).

Feeling Brave? Drink a cup of sage tea before bedtime. Some experts claim that drinking sage tea can also reduce excessive sweat.

Black Tea

Black tea makes a great natural antiperspirant due to its high levels of tannic acid. Its astringent properties tighten the skin and constrict the pores to reduce sweat.

Black tea for underarm sweating…
Add two tea bags of black tea to three to four cups of boiling water. Steep for 10-15 minutes and let cool. Dab thoroughly on underarms.

Black tea for hand and foot sweating…
Add two bags of black tea to four cups boiling water. Allow to steep in large basin or bowl for 10 minutes. When water is cool enough to touch, soak your palms or feet for 20 minutes. Like anything else, repetition is key. The effectiveness of the treatment can increase as you repeat this process daily.

Baking Soda

To be clear, baking soda will not stop excessive sweating. It does have sweat-absorbing properties that can keep you dry for short periods, but it’s more of an odor blocker than a sweat blocker.

Baking soda makes an excellent natural deodorant. It has the ability to lower pH levels in your body and absorb foul odors caused by bacteria. Many natural deodorants use baking soda as their primary deodorizing ingredient.

To apply, mix equal parts baking soda and cornstarch. Additonally, you can add lavender essential oil for its skin-soothing properties and sweet fragrance. Apply the mixture with a damp cloth to clean underarms. After 20-30 minutes, rinse with water. Again, repetition helps with effectiveness.

Chamomile Tea

A great way to reduce excessive sweating is by managing stress and anxiety.

Chamomile is one of the best herbs for eliminating stress and promoting relaxation. Both things that contribute to excessive sweating. Chamomile can also aid in digestion and get rid of body odor.

What to do? Drink two to three cups of chamomile tea each day to stay calm and fresh smelling. Remember, less stress and anxiety can lead to less sweat.

You might also place a few drops of chamomile oil into your bath water for a nice chamomile soak.

Wheatgrass

Wheatgrass can influence common sweat triggers including: pH levels, metabolism, digestive system, toxin levels, and chronic illness. These are all contributors to sweat production. Adding wheatgrass to your daily regime can help keep these sweat triggers in the “off” position.

Drink wheatgrass juice daily to get maximum benefit (available in powder form also).

Witch Hazel

Witch Hazel is also one of nature’s natural astringents (ability to shrink skin and constrict pores). Some of the most effective antiperspirants contain witch hazel. It can be particularly helpful in preventing face sweating.

Application for sweaty face, armpits and feet: Soak a cotton pad in a witch hazel solution and apply to affected areas. You can leave the witch hazel on or wash it off after 30 minutes. Repeat this process daily for maximum effectiveness.

Potato

Some home remedy experts claim that potatoes can absorb excess sweat on the body. This one does seem a bit “out there” but many consider it an effective natural antiperspirant.

How it works: Take a small piece of potato, rub it on your sweat-prone areas. Let the potato residue dry completely on skin before getting dressed. Experts also suggest wearing light, loose-fitting clothing.

Can Baby Powder Stop Sweat?

Contrary to some advice, baby powder doesn’t stop sweat. It absorbs it. If you’re willing to put up with the mess, you can apply baby powder to sweat-prone areas. Look for a talc-free baby poweder that uses cornstarch or baking soda, especially for your more private body parts.

Can Alcohol Stop Sweat?

Alcohol doesn’t stop sweat completely. It works the same way vinegar does. It helps close the pores of your skin, which helps prevent excess sweating. You can use rubbing alcohol topically. Just apply it the same way you would the apple cider vinegar.

Alcohol wipes can be a quick, though temporary, fix for sweaty hands. Simply rub your palms with alcohol wipes before any social encounter. This can help your hands stay dry enough to avoid awkward sweaty handshakes.

Keep in mind, you can’t consume rubbing alcohol. Also, using it overnight isn’t the best way to use alcohol to treat excess sweating. It’s a better idea to keep alcohol wipes on hand to use them as needed.

8. Medications to Prevent Excess Sweating

Medications for excessive sweating
Home remedies and medications can also come in handy during your battle against perspiration. It’s important to remember, all you need to do is find the right combination of sweat-reducing methods for your body. Once you do, excessive sweating will rarely cross your mind.

What Medications Can Stop Sweat?

If you prefer to use medication to stop sweating, it’s an available option. You should talk to your doctor to determine which type of medication is right for you. In most cases, you have an option of either an oral or topical treatment.

Consider Prescription Anticholinergics

When all other options are exhausted, your doctor may prescribe you an anticholinergic medication. These work by blocking the binding of your brain’s neurotransmitters to the receptor in its nerve cells. Basically, the medication blocks the signals in your brain that tell your body to produce a lot of sweat.

Some commonly prescribed medications include:

  • Glycopyrrolate
  • Propantheline
  • Benztropine
  • Oxybutynin

Topical Prescription-strength Treatments

Instead of prescribing a pill, your doctor may prefer you try a topical treatment first. Typically, topical treatments are simply prescription-strength antiperspirants that work by closing the sweat ducts on the area of skin where the medication is applied. Prescription-strength antiperspirant typically has higher concentrations of aluminum chloride.

Most of the time, this type of prescription is only recommended to help with massive sweating problems. After all, your body needs to be able to sweat a little bit. So talk to your doctor about what’s best for you.

9. Hyperhidrosis Surgery and Other Advanced Treatments

Hyperhidrosis Treatments

Botox® to Stop Sweating

If a clinical strength antiperspirant isn’t working for you, Botox® may be a viable treatment to stop stubborn sweat. OnabotulinumtoxinA Injections (Botox®) work by blocking a specific neurotransmitter in your body that stimulates your sweat glands. It essentially blocks the chemicals responsible for turning your sweat glands “on”.

Botox® involves the insertion of small needles into sweat prone areas of your body (armpits, hands, feet, head and face). If needles make you squeamish, you may want to look elsewhere for your sweating cure.

Botox® is not a permanent fix, but it can be effective. In fact, a few injections into the armpits can prevent excessive sweating for up to 6 months. Because of this, many brides choose this option to avoid getting sweat stains on their wedding dress. Sometimes teenagers heading to prom might also get this treatment, with their parents’ approval and credit cards, of course.

miraDry

miraDry is a non-invasive process where your sweat glands are “zapped” with electromagnetic energy. No sweat glands mean no sweat. Since your sweat glands don’t grow back, the results are long lasting, if not permanent. miraDry treatment costs are around $3000 and those who have undergone the procedure describe it as painful.

Studies reveal an 83 percent reduction in excessive armpit sweating. So if you can fork up the cash and don’t mind parting with your sweat glands for eternity, it might be a good idea.

Iontophoresis “Injection without a needle”

Iontophoresis is a procedure used to treat excessive sweating on the hands and feet. It’s an advanced treatment for people who suffer from hyperhidrosis or people who have failed to achieve results with clinical strength antiperspirants.

How does Iontophoresis work? It’s like an electrical injection. Patients place their hands or feet in water medicated with an anticholinergic (hyperhidrosis medication). Then the Iontophoresis device delivers the medication via electrical currents through the skin. Iontophoresis has been effective in treating sweaty feet, sweaty hands and facial hyperhidrosis.

Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy (most invasive)

This is probably the most dangerous treatment that involves destroying nerve endings associated with overactive sweat glands.

Curettage for underarm (axillary) hyperhidrosis

This treatment involves scraping and vacuuming out the sweat glands in the armpit area. Ouch.

It isn’t always easy to determine what type of products will work best to stop sweat for you. But there are plenty of options available. And once you find a solution that works, you can worry less about things like clammy hands, facial sweat or sweat-drenched shirts. You can hold your head high and walk into that first date or job interview with confidence.